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Order Calm Harmony Balance Rationality Materialism Didactic Socially conscious. Spontaneity Emotion Subjective Individual Irrational Imaginative Personal Emotion Visionary Transcendental. Neo-Classicism vs. Romanticism Commonplace (Cliché?) Comparisons. Society Reason

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Neo-Classicism vs. Romanticism Commonplace (Cliché?) Comparisons


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neo classicism vs romanticism commonplace clich comparisons
Order

Calm

Harmony

Balance

Rationality

Materialism

Didactic

Socially conscious

Spontaneity

Emotion

Subjective

Individual

Irrational

Imaginative

Personal

Emotion

Visionary

Transcendental

Neo-Classicism vs. RomanticismCommonplace (Cliché?) Comparisons
neoclassical vs romanticism commonplace comparisons
Society

Reason

Intellect

Extroversion, balanced, didactic

The normative, the social, the citizen.

Reason and social issues.

Poet’s skill and adherence to formal rules and traditional procedures.

Study of Classical Poetic and Dramatic forms.

Interest in the verifiable, the commonsensical, the familiar.

Nature

Emotion

Senses and sensuality

Introversion, moody, self interrogative

Genius, Hero, the Exceptional

Passions and inner struggles

Artistic Creativity and feeling.

Folklore, national and ethnic origins.

Interest in the Medieval, the Exotic, the Mysterious, the Occult, the monstrous, the remote.

NeoClassical vs RomanticismCommonplace Comparisons
romanticism
Romanticism
  • English Romanticism and German Romanticism.
  • Sturm und Drang (Storm and Stress): Klopstock; Goethe; Schiller—prelude to Romanticism.
  • Critique of Modernity: Alienation of modern men from Themselves (division of labor); from Community (competitiveness); from Nature (scientific objectification).
  • August and Freidrich Schlegel; Friedrich von Hardenberg (Novalis); Friedrich Holderlin; and the philosophers Schleiermacher and Schelling.
the poet as bard
The Poet as Bard
  • Significance of Johann Gottfried Herder(1744-1803)
  • James McPhereson (1736-1796) and the cult of Ossian: Fragments of Ancient Poetry collected in the Highlands of Scotland (1760)
  • Fingal (1761); Temora (1763)
  • The Poet as Prophet modeled after the old Testament seers.
wordsworth the prelude 1805 book iii lines 82 167
Wordsworth: The Prelude (1805) Book III, Lines 82-167

Why should I grieve? I was a chosen Son.

For hither I had come with holy powers

And faculties, whether to work or feel:

To apprehend all passions and all moods

Which time, and place, and season do impress

Upon the visible universe, and work

Like changes there by force of my own mind.

the prelude lines 139 144
The Prelude, Lines: 139-144

So was it with me in my solitude;

So often among multitudes of men.

Unknown, unthought of, yet I was most rich,

I had a world about me; 'twas my own,

I made it; for it only liv'd to me,

And to the God who look'd into my mind.

151 167
151-167

If prophecy be madness; if things view'd

By Poets in old time, and higher up

By the first men, earth's first inhabitants,

May in these tutor'd days no more be seen

With undisorder'd sight: but leaving this

It was no madness: for I had an eye

Which in my strongest workings, evermore

Was looking for the shades of difference

As they lie hid in all exterior forms,

Near or remote, minute or vast, an eye

Which from a stone, a tree, a wither'd leaf,

To the broad ocean and the azure heavens,

Spangled with kindred multitudes of stars,

Could find no surface where its power might sleep,

Which spake perpetual logic to my soul,

And by an unrelenting agency /Did bind my feelings, even as in a chain.

biblical history
Biblical History
  • Return to Christian mysteries: The Great Code.
  • Christian history versus Classical History
  • Cyclical and Recurrent versus Finite,Sequential, Symmetrical.
  • Innocence, the Fall ,Redemption.
  • The Apocalypse; Revelation
  • Poetry and the forging of a new mythology