ethos discipline and all that what the research says l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Ethos, discipline and all that - what the research says. PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Ethos, discipline and all that - what the research says.

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 7

Ethos, discipline and all that - what the research says. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 130 Views
  • Uploaded on

Ethos, discipline and all that - what the research says. Pamela Munn The University of Edinburgh. What does the research say?. Schools make a difference. Describes practices which make a difference - classroom - school - local authority.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Ethos, discipline and all that - what the research says.' - annette


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
ethos discipline and all that what the research says

Ethos, discipline and all that- what the research says.

Pamela Munn

The University of Edinburgh

what does the research say
What does the research say?
  • Schools make a difference.
  • Describes practices which make a difference

- classroom

- school

- local authority.

  • Provides a perspective on national policy.
  • Helps clarify concepts.

____________________________________

Professor Pamela Munn, University of Edinburgh

slide3

Causes of Indiscipline

  • Medical
  • Psychological
  • Schools

Professor Pamela Munn, University of Edinburgh

slide4

Encouraged Exclusion Discouraged Exclusion

Beliefs about school, teaching and pupils

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

narrow definition of teacher’s job, focused wide remit, including personal and social

on subject knowledge, exam results development of pupils, as well as exam

results

academic goals prominent social and academic goals

acceptable pupils were those who arrived acceptance of a wide range of pupils,

willing to learn, and came from supportive including those with learning and other

homes difficulties

Encouraged Exclusion Discouraged Exclusion

The Curriculum

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

academic curriculum, pressure on pupils, curriculum flexible and differentiated

lack of differentiation

personal and social development personal and social development

curriculum lacks status curriculum highly valued

potential of informal curriculum for informal curriculum, lively and covering

motivating less academic pupils not a wide range of activities, such as sport,

realized drama, art, working in the local

community

Professor Pamela Munn, University of Edinburgh

slide5

Relations with the outside world

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

parents expected unquestioningly to time and effort spent involving parents

support the school in decision-making about their children

educational psychologists and others seen educational psychologists and others

as there to cure problems seen as partners in working out

solutions to problems

Decision-making about exclusion

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Hierarchical decision-making separating Decisions informed by a network of

pastoral support staff from those with staff with a range of perspectives on

responsibility for maintaining discipline the pupil

Tariff systems leading to automatic Flexible system, behaviour evaluated

exclusion in context

Pastoral support staff expected to meet Pastoral support staff – an information

needs of all pupils source on decisions

Learning/behaviour support expected to Learning/behaviour support a source of

remove troublesome pupils and solve support and ideas for mainstream staff

problems

Fig.2: School ethos and exclusion

____________________________________

Professor Pamela Munn, University of Edinburgh

what is ethos
WHAT IS ETHOS?

‘THE GUIDING BELIEFS, STANDARDS OR IDEALS THAT CHARACTERISE OR NOT OF PERVADE A GROUP, A COMMUNITY, A PEOPLE … THE SPIRIT THAT MOTIVATES THE IDEAS, CUSTOMS OR PRACTICES OF A PEOPLE’

(Websters 1986)

3 KEY IDEAS

  • PERVASIVENESS

touches on all aspects of a school’s life

can be hard to pin down

  • PRACTICE

ethos underpins what we do and how we do it – not an abstract idea helps explain differences among schools

  • COLLECTIVE UNDERSTANDING

the taken for granted about how we operate

____________________________________

Professor Pamela Munn, University of Edinburgh

slide7
No technical training in educational methods can ever be (sufficient), however unexceptionable the methods may be in themselves. Education is not and cannot ever be a technical activity. The attempt to turn would be teachers into technicians by teaching them classroom tricks is as stupid as it is ineffective . . . Here, I believe, is the greatest threat to education in our own society. We are becoming more and more technically minded: gradually we are falling victim to the illusion that all problems can be solved by proper organisation: that when we fail it is because we are doing the job in the wrong way, and that all that is needed is the ‘know-how’. To think thus in education is to pervert education. It is not an engineering job. It is personal and human.

(Macmurray, 1958)

____________________________________

Professor Pamela Munn, University of Edinburgh