The First Art Movements of Photography Pictorialism ‘The New Photography’ FSA Group f64 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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The First Art Movements of Photography Pictorialism ‘The New Photography’ FSA Group f64

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  1. The First Art Movements of PhotographyPictorialism‘The New Photography’FSAGroup f64

  2. PICTORIALISM Pictorialism was an international movement of art photography during the later 19th and early 20th centuries. For the Pictorialist, a photograph should be like painting, printmaking or drawing. Pictorialists used elaborate printing techniques to make their photographs look like “art”

  3. Pictorialism was part of the European trend of modern art Impressionism – Monet, Degas, Whistler Post-Impressionism – Van Gogh, Gauguin Art Nouveau –Beardsley, Klimt Pictorialist photographers were influenced by Impressionist painters like Whistler. Everyone was influenced by Japanase woddcut art … Whistler, Nocturne in Black and Gold 1873

  4. Hiroshige, The 53 Stations of the Tokkaido Road, 1855 Whistler, Nocturne in Black and Gold 1873

  5. Japanese art arrived in the West after Japan opened up its borders in the 1860s. Japanese woodcuts influenced Impressionist painters such as Monet, Van Gogh and Whistler. Japanese art was noted for its graphic compositions, flattened perspective and simple pure colours. Hiroshige, The 53 Stations of the Tokkaido Road, 1855

  6. Hiroshige, The 53 Stations of the Tokkaido Road, 1855 Alvin Langdon Coburn, from London 1910

  7. Alvin Langdon Coburn was a Pictorialist photographer influenced by Impressionism and Japanese woodcut art. He used a telephoto lens to flatten perspective and make his compositions more graphic. His photographs were printed using the photogravure printmaking process which gave them a soft quality like drawings. Alvin Langdon Coburn, from London 1910

  8. Alvin Langdon Coburn, from London 1910 Alvin Langdon Coburn, from London 1910

  9. Alvin Langdon Coburn, from London 1910 Alvin Langdon Coburn, from London 1910

  10. Edward Steichen, The Flatiron 1904 “The Flatiron is a chromatic study of twilight. It is clearly indebted in its composition to the Japanese woodcuts that were in vogue at the turn of the century and, in its coloristic effect, to the Nocturnes of Whistler. This picture is a prime example of the conscious effort of photographers in the circle of Alfred Stieglitz to assert the artistic potential of their medium” www.metmuseum.org

  11. Edward Steichen, The Flatiron 1904 Edward Steichen, The Big White Cloud, Lake George, 1903

  12. Edward Steichen, The Big White Cloud, Lake George, 1903 Edward Steichen, Torso, Paris. 1902 photogravure

  13. Julia Margaret Cameron, The Echo 1868 Cameron was the inspiration for many Pictorialist artists. This image image was made 34 years before the Kasebier. Gertrude Kasebier, Miss N. Portrait of the actress Evelyn Nesbit, 1902

  14. Harold Casneux, Steam and Sunshine, 1935 AUSTRALIA Harold Casneaux was Australia’s leading Pictorialist, and one of our greatest photographers. In Pictorialism, even an industrial subject is made into a soft, dreamy art image.

  15. Harold Casneux, Steam and Sunshine, 1935 John Kaufmann, The Street Corner 1914

  16. John Kaufmann, The Street Corner 1914 Jack Cato, Through a Collins Street Window

  17. Alfred Stieglitz, The Steerage, 1907 HINGE The photograph has fascinated photographers for 100 years because it is so well designed and is so open to interpretation.

  18. Alfred Stieglitz, The Steerage, 1907 The madonna figure amongst the poor passengers in the bottom section gives the picture a symbolic quality. She resembles depictions of Mary, the mother of Christ.

  19. Alfred Stieglitz, The Steerage, 1907 . The bright gangplank seems to separate the poorer steerage passengers below from the better-off ones above. This suggests the class divisions of society.

  20. Alfred Stieglitz, The Steerage, 1907 . The bright gangplank seems to separate the poorer steerage passengers below from the better-off ones above. This suggests the class divisions of society.

  21. Alfred Stieglitz, The Steerage, 1907 The composition is so solid, the picture evens works upside-down.

  22. Alfred Stieglitz, The Steerage, 1907 Its tight geometric structure and flattened depth predicts the coming of modernism and abstraction in photography.

  23. THE NEW PHOTOGRAPHY • In the 1920s and '30s unconventional new forms and techniques suddenly appeared in photography. • unusual camera angles • moving cameras and subjects • the use of small cameras, especially the Leica • new techniques such as photomontage and photogram • This approach was promoted in the German Bauhaus school and in the Constructivist movement in Russia.

  24. What is the subject of this photograph? Moholy-Nagy has photographed a park from a high angle, emphasizing its abstract qualities. Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, From the radio tower 1928

  25. Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, untitled painting, 1922 His abstract photographs were part of his overall interest in abstraction and experimentation. Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, From the radio tower 1928

  26. Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, From the radio tower 1928 Boris Ignatovich, Construction Site, 1929

  27. Higher speed films were making faster shutter speeds possible. A high speed film in the 1920s was 100 ISO. Martin Munkacsi, Liberia, 1931

  28. WilliRuge, The Photographer, 1931 Martin Munkacsi, Liberia, 1931

  29. WilliRuge, The Photographer, 1931 Leica advertisement, c1930

  30. Albert Renger-Patszch Albert Renger-Patszch

  31. Albert Renger-Patszch Lucia Moholy, portrait ofFranz Roh1926

  32. Moholy-Nagy pioneered the Photogram, a camera-less technique where objects are laid directly on the photographic paper in the darkroom. Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, photogram 1928

  33. Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Jealousy, photomontage 1928 Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, photogram 1928

  34. This image by Moholy-Nagy is a photomontage, a collage made from cutup photos. Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Jealousy, photomontage 1928

  35. GROUP F64 Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Imogen Cunningham and others A circle of Californian photographers in the 1930s who believed in using the camera to record the world accurately and objectively. This was in opposition to the poetic and painterly visions of the Pictorialists. F64 was the smallest aperture available in large-format view cameras, giving maximum sharpness in the image.

  36. Edward Weston "The camera should be used for a recording of life, for rendering the very substance and quintessence of the thing itself, whether it be polished steel or palpitating flesh.” Edward Weston in 1937

  37. Edward Weston, Pepper no. 30, 1932 One of Edward Weston’s most famous photographs is Pepper no. 30, made in 1932. He has made it look voluptuous, like a nude.

  38. Edward Weston, Pepper no. 30, 1932 Edward Weston, Nude, 1936

  39. Edward Weston, Shell, 1927 Edward Weston, Nude, 1936

  40. Edward Weston, Dunes, Oceano, 1936 Edward Weston, Shell, 1927

  41. Edward Weston, Excusado, 1925 Edward Weston, Shell, 1927

  42. The f64 photographers made contact-prints to preserve all the detail and tone of their 10”x8” negatives. Their approach became known as the Fine Print:The Fine Print represents to me an expressive object of beauty and excellence. A fine print is generally assumed to have a full range of values, clear definition of form and texture, and a satisfactory print ‘colour’ … a note of pure white or solid black can serve as a “key” to other values, and an image that needs these key values will feel weak without them. - Ansel Adams

  43. Ansel Adams, Mount Williamson 1944

  44. Ansel Adams, The Tetons and Snake River, 1945

  45. Contemporary Photographers

  46. Rocky Schenk, Nine Trees, 1998

  47. Rocky Schenk, Promenade, 2003

  48. Rocky Schenk, Holland Park, 1997

  49. Jane Burton is a Melbourne photographer whose photographs create moods and emotions. The series called Available Light was made in 2003 and mixes nudes, figure studies and landscapes Jane Burton, Available Light 12

  50. Jane Burton, Available Light 12 Jane Burton, Available Light 3