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Get ready for the quiz

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  1. Get ready for the quiz Based on last day’s “Wartime production and role of women”

  2. 1. Churchill referred to the British war as “total war” whereas King referred to Canada as being this?2. Who was Canada’s Minister of Munitions and Supplies? 3.What does CMAC stand for? 4. What declaration combined the US and Canadian economic efforts for the war? 5. Name two things that were introduced by King in the 1940’s that were discussed in the last lesson Quiz # 2

  3. 1. Churchill referred to the British war as “total war” whereas King referred to Canada as being this?Arsenal of Democracy 2. Who was Canada’s Minister of Munitions and Supplies? C.D. Howe 3.What does CWAC stand for? Canadian Women’s Army Corps 4. What declaration combined the US and Canadian economic efforts for the war? The Hyde Park Declaration 5. Name two things that were introduced by King in the 1940’s that were discussed in the last lesson Wartime Prices and Trade Board, Food rationing, Unemployment Insurance, Family Allowance Quiz # 2

  4. The Home Front “Enemy Aliens,” The St. Louis Incident and Japanese Internment

  5. In this lesson you will be able to: • Assess Canada’s role in World War II and the war’s impact on Canada • Explain the war’s impact on the home front (“enemy aliens”) • Assess Canada’s participation in world affairs with reference to human rights • Recognize the importance of both individual and collective action in addressing human rights issues (response to the refugee policy) Objectives

  6. Similar to WWI, Cnd gov’t required groups of Canadians whose ancestry was of one of the enemy countries to register as enemy aliens – for fear they may be spies or commit acts of sabotage • Over 100,000 Canadians were forced to register – about 650 were interned at camps • The War Measures Act gave the government the power to arrest and detain people suspected of being enemies of the state Enemy Aliens

  7. Anti-Semitism (hatred for Jewish people) existed in Canada even before WWII. • Canada’s immigration policy was restrictive – British and American immigrants were “preferred,” while immigrants of other backgrounds were actively discouraged • In 1938 the Canadian League of Nations Society met with P.M. Mackenzie King. He asked King to accept Jewish refugees based on humanitarian grounds. One gov’t official responded, “We don’t want to take too many Jews, but in the present circumstances particularly, we don’t want to say so.” • When asked how many Jews the Canadian gov’t intended to allow to enter Canada, a gov’t official responded “None is too many” Treatment of Jewish People in Canada

  8. After Kristallnacht(the “night of broken glass”, 9 November 1938) many Jewish people tried to leave Germany • The ocean liner, St. Louis was to take Jewish refugees from Germany to Cuba before entering the U.S. • The ship anchored in the harbour but never allowed to land. • Nazi propaganda convinced Cuba to see the refugees as a threat (fabricated criminal backgrounds for the passengers) • The St. Louis tried to land in Florida with no success The St. Louis Incident

  9. June 1939 – St. Louis arrived off Canada’s East coast, carrying 907 Jewish people (including 400 women and children) • The Cnd gov’t would not accept the refugees and the St. Louis was forced to return to Europe • Many of the passengers died in Nazi concentration camps The St. Louis Incident

  10. Watch the video “None is too many” runtime 11:30 • Summarize the video in your own words • Pose a question for the class (afterwards we will discuss in partners) Watch, Summarize, Question

  11. Prior to WWII • White Canadians felt the Japanese were competition for jobs – would work for lower wages • On September 7, 1907 – an angry mob rioted through Chinatown, damaging property and attacking citizens, before turning to Japantown. The Japanese community fought back • 1928 – to control population growth, P.M. Mackenzie King limited the number of Japanese immigrants into Canada to 150 a year • Before WWII, Japanese and Chinese Canadians were denied the right to vote and were not permitted to join the armed forces Japanese Internment

  12. During WWII • Internment began in 1942 when Canada declared war on Japan (December 7, 1942). • It was the same day Japan attacked Pearl Harbour and Hong Kong • People feared Japanese Canadians would supply Japan with secret information or help them invade Canada. • Early 1942, the Canadian Gov’t required all Japanese Canadians to move from the Pacific Coast (about 23,000 people- ¾ were Canadian citizens) • Was the largest mass movement of people in Canadian history Japanese Internment

  13. Newspapers in BC demanded to be rid of the “yellow menace” • The gov’t feared they posed a security risk & that their presence in large cities put them at risk from violence • Initially, families were broken up, men went to work camps while women and children were “relocated” to interior communities, the prairies or Ontario POW camps. • Conditions were so drastic that Japanese in Japan sent assistance through the Red Cross. Japanese Internment

  14. Any property or belongings the Japanese had were confiscated, then sold to pay for their internment(by the Custodian of Aliens Act) • At the end of the war, they were forced to move out of BC or be “repatriated” to Japan. • Many were 2nd generation, & had never seen Japan • They weren’t permitted to return to the coast of BC until 1949. • Japanese were not given the vote until 1949(even if they were born in Canada) • 1988, Can. gov’t apologized & paid $21,000 to each survivor. Japanese Internment