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Meeting the Needs of Students with Emotional Disturbance in the School Setting. Place photo here. Maryland’s Children in Special Education with Emotional Disturbance: An Overview of Data and Current Outcomes. Dr. Carol Ann Baglin Assistant State Superintendent

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meeting the needs of students with emotional disturbance in the school setting
Meeting the Needs of Students with Emotional Disturbance in the School Setting

Place photo here

Maryland’s Children in Special Education with Emotional Disturbance: An Overview of Data and Current Outcomes

Dr. Carol Ann Baglin

Assistant State Superintendent

Division of Special Education/Early Intervention Services

April 28, 2008

slide2

"All students come to school with unmet needs. Most students have the ability to delay these needs. Our children focus on nothing else until these needs are met. Meet the needs early or consume your time fighting them. The choice is yours,

  • not theirs.” — Tobin, 1991
emotional disturbance defined
Emotional Disturbance: Defined

Emotional Disturbance as defined by IDEA:

"...a condition exhibiting one or more of the following characteristics over a long period of time and to a marked degree, that adversely affects a student’s educational performance:

(i) An inability to learn that cannot be explained by intellectual,

sensory or health factors;

(ii) An inability to build or maintain satisfactory interpersonal

relationships with peers and teachers;

(iii) Inappropriate types of behavior or feelings under normal

circumstances;(iv) A general, pervasive mood of unhappiness or depression; or

emotional disturbance defined4
Emotional Disturbance: Defined

(v) A tendency to develop physical symptoms or fear associated with

personal or school problems.“

Emotional disturbance includes schizophrenia. Emotional disturbance does not include a student who is socially maladjusted unless it is determined that the student has an emotional disturbance.

[Code of Federal Regulations, Title 34 C.F.R., Section 300.8(c)(4)] [Code of Maryland Annotated Regulations, Section 13A.05.01.03]

some characteristics and behaviors of children with emotional disturbance
Some Characteristics and Behaviors of Children with Emotional Disturbance
  • Hyperactivity
  • Aggression/self-injurious behavior
  • Withdrawal
  • Immaturity
  • Learning difficulties
maryland 2006 data children with emotional disturbance by gender
Maryland 2006 Data: Children with Emotional Disturbance by Gender

Data supplied by the Maryland Local School Systems 2006

national data children with emotional disturbance by ethnicity
National Data: Children with Emotional Disturbance by Ethnicity

US Department of Education Office of Special Education Programs, Data Analysis Systems 2007

maryland 2006 data children with emotional disturbance by ethnicity
Maryland 2006 Data: Children with Emotional Disturbance by Ethnicity

Data supplied by Maryland’s Local School System and produced by Optimal Solutions Group

least restrictive environment lre defined
Least Restrictive Environment (LRE): Defined

LRE is an educational environment that meets the need of a student requiring special education and related services as set forth in the student’s IEP and which, to the maximum extent appropriate to the students needs, ensures that the student will be educated with nondisabled peers.

34 C.F.R. section 300.114-300.120

COMAR 13A.05.01.10

least restrictive environment lre defined16
Least Restrictive Environment (LRE): Defined

To the maximum extent appropriate, children with disabilities, including children in public or private institutions or other care facilities, are educated with children that are not disabled, and special classes, separate schooling, or other removal of children with disabilities from the regular educational environment occurs only when the nature or the severity of the disability of a student is such that education in regular classes with the use of supplementary aids and services can not be achieved satisfactorily.

34 C.F.R. section 300.114-300.120

COMAR 13A.05.01.10

students with emotional disturbance in public and private educational placements 2006
Students with Emotional Disturbance in Public and Private Educational Placements 2006

Percentage

Number

Percentage

Number

students with emotional disturbance in public and private educational placements 200621
Students with Emotional Disturbance in Public and Private Educational Placements 2006

Percentage

Percentage

Number

Number

nonpublic schools expenditures for the 2006 2007 school year
Nonpublic Schools Expenditures for the 2006-2007 School Year
  • The total Tuition and Services expenditure to fund students with disabilities in day and residential nonpublic placements was $212,790,968
  • The LSS Share of the Total was $113,453,662
  • The MDSE Share of the Total was $99,337,307
students with emotional disturbance in nonpublic placements for the 2006 2007 school year
Students with Emotional Disturbance in Nonpublic Placements for the 2006-2007 School Year
  • 5,361 placements funded
  • 2,439 were students in private separate day or private residential placements
  • 22 of the 24 LSSs placed students in nonpublic programs
  • Total cost of serving students was $93,583,288
slide28
State Performance PlanIndicator 3: Participation and Performance of Children with Disabilities on Statewide Assessments
  • Indicator 3 consists of three sub-indicators 3A, 3B and 3C.
  • 3A - Percent of districts that have a disability subgroup that meets the State’s minimum “n” size meeting the State’s AYP objectives for progress for disability subgroup.
  • 3B - Participation rate for children with IEPs in a regular assessment with no accommodations; regular assessment with accommodations; alternate assessment against grade level standards; alternate assessment against alternate achievement standards.
  • 3C - Proficiency rate for children with IEPs against grade level standards and alternate achievement standards.
indicator 3 preliminary 2006 english 2 and algebra data analysis hsa data
Indicator 3 Preliminary 2006 English 2 and Algebra/ Data Analysis HSA Data

MD Students with ED

MD SWD

MD ALL

state performance plan indicator 4 rates of suspension and expulsion
State Performance PlanIndicator 4: Rates of Suspension and Expulsion
  • A.Percent of districts identified by the State as having a significant discrepancy in the rates of suspensions and expulsions of children with disabilities for greater than 10 days in a school year; and
    • TARGET 2007: No More than 4 or 16. 67% of the LSS show a significant discrepancy in the rates of suspensions and expulsions greater than 10 days for all students with disabilities compared with all nondisabled students.
  • B. Percent of districts identified by the State as having a significant discrepancy in the rates of suspensions and expulsions of greater than 10 days in a school year of children with disabilities by race and ethnicity.
    • TARGET 2007: No More than 4 or 16. 67% of the LSS show a significant discrepancy in the rates of suspensions and expulsions greater than 10 days for all students with disabilities by race/ethnicity compared with all nondisabled students of the same race and ethnicity.
2006 data suspensions of students with emotional disturbance
2006 Data: Suspensions of Students with Emotional Disturbance

Of Maryland’s Special Education subgroup

8.16% have an Emotional Disturbance

52 % of the Special Education Subgroup suspended have an Emotional Disturbance

state performance plan indicator 1 graduation rate indicator 2 drop out rate
State Performance PlanIndicator 1: Graduation RateIndicator 2: Drop Out Rate
  • Indicator 1: Percent of youth with IEPs graduation from high school with a regular diploma compared to percent of all youth in the State graduating with a regular diploma.
    • TARGET 2007: 83.24%
  • Indicator 2: Percent of youth with IEPs dropping out of high school compared to the percent of all youth in the State dropping out of high school.
    • TARGET 2007: 3.54% or LESS

As Reported in SPP/APR February 2007

graduation and drop out rate for students with emotional disturbance
Graduation and Drop Out Rate for Students with Emotional Disturbance

Percentage Rate for Graduates & Students Opting to Drop Out

Graduation Year

educational implications
Educational Implications

Educational Programs need to include:

  • The educational programs for students with emotional disturbance need to include attention to mastering academics, developing social skills, and increasing self-awareness, self-esteem, and self-control.
  • Behavior modification is one of the most widely used approaches to helping children who are emotional disturbed. However, there are many other techniques that are also successful and may be used in combination with behavior modification. Life Space Intervention and Conflict Resolution are two such techniques.
  • There is growing recognition that families, as well as their children, need support, respite care, intensive case management services, and multi-agency treatment plan. Many communities are working toward providing these wrap-around services, and there are a growing number of agencies and organizations actively involved in establishing support services in the community.
educational implications continued
Educational Implications (Continued)
  • Special programs usually attempt to provide a therapeutic milieu, a structured environment where students experience a high degree of success; rules and routines are predictable; and students are consistently rewarded for appropriate behavior.
  • Behavior management techniques, such as positive reinforcement, token economies, contracting, and time-out, which rely on direct measurement and monitoring of behavioral change, are commonly used in emotional disturbed programs.
  • The assessment and systematic teaching of social skills through modeling, discussion, and rehearsal are frequently used to help students increase control over their behavior and improve their relations with others.
  • Supportive therapies involving music, art, exercise, and relaxation techniques, as well as affective education, individual, and group counseling can be employed to improve self-understanding, self-esteem, and self-control.
research based interventions in maryland
Research-based Interventions in Maryland
  • Supporting Social and Emotional Development in Young Children (CSEFEL)
  • The Maryland Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation Project
  • Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports
  • US Department of Health & Human Services Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
supporting social and emotional development in young children csefel
Supporting Social and Emotional Development in Young Children (CSEFEL)
  • MD is one of three States initially chosen by CSEFEL to participate in a three year initiative to enhance the State’s capacity to strengthen social and emotional development of young children
  • Broad goal: Build a consistent , evidence-based professional development framework for the early care and education workforce
maryland csefel partnership
Maryland/CSEFEL Partnership
  • CSEFEL Role: To provide training and technical assistance on the Pyramid Model for Supporting Social Emotional Competence to State team, demonstration sites, trainers, and coaches
  • State Role: To plan and coordinate the initial implementation of Pyramid Model in Maryland
maryland csefel partnership outcomes
Maryland/CSEFEL Partnership:Outcomes
  • Increasing ECE provider competence and confidence in supporting social and emotional development of young children
  • Creating cadre of trainers and coaches
  • Demonstration of evidence-based practices
  • Sustaining the effort
  • GOOD CHILD OUTCOMES!
the maryland early childhood mental health ecmh consultation project
The Maryland Early Childhood Mental Health (ECMH) Consultation Project
  • Goals of the Project:
    • Prevention and intervention services to children and families
    • Identification and referrals for children with developmental, socio-emotional, or behavioral concerns
    • Support to child care programs to provide stress-free learning environments
    • Coordination of services with public schools, health departments, and other core service providers
the maryland early childhood mental health ecmh consultation project46
The Maryland Early Childhood Mental Health (ECMH) Consultation Project

Data of the Project Pilot Sites

  • Early Intervention Project (EIP) operates in Baltimore City by the Baltimore City Child Care Resource Center.
      • A child-focused program model delivered by early-childhood trained interventionists with increase commitment to referred students over the two year implementation time line.
    • Project Right Steps serves the five-county region of the Eastern Shore by Chesapeake College, through the Child Care Resource & Referral Center.
      • A child-focused model to support changes in the child’s behavior through work with both the child care provider and the family.
the maryland early childhood mental health ecmh consultation project47
The Maryland Early Childhood Mental Health (ECMH) Consultation Project
  • Expansion of the pilot projects to 13 sites statewide encompassing all regions of the state
  • State-funded grant program is coordinated by the Division of Early Childhood Development within MSDE
the maryland early childhood mental health ecmh consultation project early intervention project eip
The Maryland Early Childhood Mental Health (ECMH) Consultation Project Early Intervention Project (EIP)

Early Intervention Project (EIP) operated in Baltimore City by the Baltimore City Child Care Resource Center.

the maryland early childhood mental health ecmh consultation project49
The Maryland Early Childhood Mental Health (ECMH) Consultation Project

Right Steps Project serves the 5 county region of the Eastern Shore by Chesapeake College, through the Child Care Resource & Referral Center.

positive behavioral interventions and supports
Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

Tertiary Prevention:

Specialized Individualized

Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior

CONTINUUM OF

SCHOOL-WIDE

INSTRUCTIONAL &

POSITIVE BEHAVIOR

SUPPORT

~5%

~15%

Secondary Prevention:

Specialized Group

Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior

Primary Prevention:

School-/Classroom-

Wide Systems for

All Students,

Staff, & Settings

~80% of Students

pbis in maryland public schools
PBIS In Maryland Public Schools
  • Are schools implementing school–wide Positive Behavior Support?
east baltimore mental health partnership baltimore maryland
East Baltimore Mental Health Partnership, Baltimore, Maryland
  • East Baltimore Partnership was developed in 1993 by a coalition of leaders, including representatives from city agencies; state departments; and other private and public entities:
    • Johns Hopkins University
    • University of Maryland
    • Families Involved Together
    • Alliance for the Mentally Ill
slide54
The Maryland State Department of Education and Division of Special Education/Early Intervention Services: NEW Initiatives
  • $300,000 in grants to local school systems (LSS) to fund research and best practices to connect students of adoption and their families to support systems.
  • $1 Million in grants to LSS to provide research-based interventions to improve the outcomes for students with Emotional Disturbance and increase student achievement.
what are the important components within the school setting
What Are the Important Components within the School Setting?

When behaviors impede learning (including the learning of others), the IEP must include strategies to address that behavior.

    • Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA)
    • Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP)
  • Families need support, respite care, intensive case management, and a collaborative, multi-agency approach to services.
promoting academic success
Promoting Academic Success
  • Children with emotional and behavioral problems like their classmates, learn best in classrooms characterized by effective instruction and behavior management routines.
  • Educators take into account the strengths and needs of all their students when designing effective learning opportunities.
    • Task Difficulty
    • Lesson Presentation
    • Motivational Strategies
    • Work Assignments
    • Involving Other

Ideas That Work, Office of Special Education

slide57

"All students come to school with unmet needs. Most students have the ability to delay these needs. Our children focus on nothing else until these needs are met. Meet the needs early or consume your time fighting them. The choice is yours,

  • not theirs."
  • — Tobin, 1991