NEW MEDIA & THE COURTS THE CURRENT STATUS & A LOOK AT THE FUTURE - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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NEW MEDIA & THE COURTS THE CURRENT STATUS & A LOOK AT THE FUTURE

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  1. NEW MEDIA &THE COURTSTHE CURRENT STATUS & A LOOK AT THE FUTURE CCPIO New Media Projecthttp://ccpionewmedia.ning.com/ Chris Davey Public Information Director, The Supreme Court of Ohio Karen Salaz Administrator for the Colorado 19th Judicial District Thomas Hodson Director , Scripps School of Journalism, Ohio University

  2. Revolution or Fad?

  3. Twitter in the Courtroom

  4. Judges on Twitter http://twitter.com/mjkramer

  5. Judges on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/pages/Beatty-for-Judge/280057109186

  6. U.S. Supreme Court on Twitter http://twitter.com/ussupremecourt

  7. U.S. Supreme Court Coverage on Twitter http://twitter.com/scotusopinions

  8. Tennessee Courts on Twitter http://twitter.com/tncourts

  9. Texas Court Administrator’s Blog http://courtex.blogspot.com/

  10. Ohio DRC on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/OhioDepartmentofRehabilitationandCorrection?ref=ts

  11. Community Corrections on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/pages/Alvis-House/166578212845?ref=ts

  12. Courts on YouTube http://www.youtube.com/californiacourts

  13. New Media & the Courts • Judicial community actively exploring new media. • “New media” defined: • Interactive social media technologies that are multimedia in nature • Fundamental, continuing changes to economics, operation and vitality of news industry • Broad cultural changes in way public receives, processes information & understands world.

  14. Legacy Media 2009 • 293 newspapers folded. • 8 magazines with combined circulation of 1 million closed. • Total of more than 1,100 online and print magazines of all sizes closed. • 100 TV stations’ parent companies in Chapter 11. • Radio industry lost 15-20 percent of revenue, 10,000 jobs lost. (SOURCE: 2010 State of the Media, Vocus Media Research.)

  15. Legacy Media 2010 • Future of New and Old Media connected  • Technology is shifting power to newsmakers (framing events).  • Ranks of self-interested information providers growing, and news organizations must define their relationship to them.  • When it comes to audience numbers online, traditional media content still prevails, which means the cutbacks in old media heavily impact what the public is learning through the new.(SOURCE:Project For Excellence In Journalism: 2010 State of the News Media.)

  16. Traditional PR & Outreach • Brochures • Annual Reports • Press Conferences • News Releases • Media Relations • Educational Programs

  17. Digital Media “Web 1.0” • Traditional Websites • Little to no interactivity • More static • Less multimedia • Posting of brochures, other publications, as PDFs • Passive (audience comes to the information).

  18. Social Media “Web 2.0” • Enabling conversations • “You cannot control conversations, but you can influence them.” • Users actively create & respond to content. • Unstructured. • Used more than other forms of digital media. • Creating public expectation.

  19. CCPIO Research • Effects on court proceedings.  • Effects on ethics and conduct for judges and court employees.  • Effects on courts’ ability to promote understanding and public trust and confidence in the judicial branch. 

  20. CCPIO Research • First-time national baseline data. • Social media site created to share Info (http://ccpionewmedia.ning.com). • Survey of judges and administrators. • Report released in August 2010. • Research Will Be Ongoing. • “Order in the Court 2.0”

  21. Categories of Technology • 7 categories of technology • Social media profile sites • Microblogging technology • Smartphones, tablets & notebooks • Monitoring & metrics • News categorizing, sharing & syndication • Visual media sharing sites • Wikis.

  22. Survey Results • About 40 percent of responding judges use social media profile sites, the majority on Facebook. U.S. adult use about same. • Judges who do not stand for election much less likely (only about 9 percent) to use social media profile sites.

  23. Survey Results (continued) • Nearly half of judges (47.8 percent) disagreed that judges can use social media profile sites in their professional lives without compromising professional conduct codes of ethics. • 34.3 percent of judges disagree that judges can use social media profile sites in their personal lives without compromising professional conduct codes of ethics.

  24. Survey Results (continued) • More than half (56 percent) of judges report routine juror instructions on new media use. • A very small fraction of courts as institutions use new media: • 6.7 percent have social media profile sites • 7 percent use microblogging sites • 3.2 percent use visual media sharing sites.

  25. Survey Results (continued) • About three-quarters of all respondents agree or are neutral that courts as institutions can maintain a social media profile site, or use microblogging technologies or visual media sharing without compromising ethics. • Only about 25 percent of total respondents believe that these are necessary tools for public outreach.

  26. Survey Results (continued) • Only 9.8 percent reported witnessing jurors using social media profile sites, microblogging sites, or smart phones, tablets and notebooks in the courtroom. • Almost all (97.6 percent) respondents agree that judges and court employees should be educated about appropriate new media use and practices.

  27. New Media Culture Clash

  28. Responding to New Media • Revise employee conduct policies • Revise jury instructions • Become primary content providers • Develop multimedia capabilities • PIOs and IT form stronger partnerships and collaborative operations • Participate in the conversation at http://ccpionewmedia.ning.com/

  29. Responding to New Media • What need do we want to address by using social media? • Can our technological infrastructure (server, software, hardware, staff) support our planned social media use? • Will our organizational infrastructure (funding, staffing, policies) support our planned social media use?

  30. Responding to New Media • Do our employee and judicial codes of conduct accommodate social media use? Are employees aware of the potential risks? • Does our courthouse have policies posted on its website and elsewhere? Are jurors and witnesses aware of policies? What about media?

  31. NEW MEDIA &THE COURTSTHE CURRENT STATUS & A LOOK AT THE FUTURE CCPIO New Media Projecthttp://ccpionewmedia.ning.com/ Chris Davey Public Information Director, The Supreme Court of Ohio Karen Salaz Administrator for the Colorado 19th Judicial District Thomas Hodson Director , Scripps School of Journalism, Ohio University