australian national epidemiological study of self injury anessi n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Australian National Epidemiological Study of Self Injury (ANESSI) PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Australian National Epidemiological Study of Self Injury (ANESSI)

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 17

Australian National Epidemiological Study of Self Injury (ANESSI) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 93 Views
  • Uploaded on

Australian National Epidemiological Study of Self Injury (ANESSI). Sarah Swannell , The University of Queensland, Australia Prof Graham Martin, The University of Queensland, Australia A/Prof Philip Hazell , University of Sydney, Australia Dr James Harrison, Flinders University, Australia

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Australian National Epidemiological Study of Self Injury (ANESSI)' - alika-dyer


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
australian national epidemiological study of self injury anessi

Australian National Epidemiological Study of Self Injury (ANESSI)

Sarah Swannell, The University of Queensland, Australia

Prof Graham Martin, The University of Queensland, Australia

A/Prof Philip Hazell, University of Sydney, Australia

Dr James Harrison, Flinders University, Australia

Dr Anne Taylor, Department of Health, South Australian Government

12th European Symposium on Suicide and Suicidal Behaviour27th - 30th August 2008Glasgow - Scotland

Saturday August 30, 2008

010.8.2 (0900-1100)

0915-0930

outline
OUTLINE
  • Background of self injury
  • Population estimates of self injury
  • Aims
  • Design/sampling
  • Survey
  • Sample characteristics
  • Characteristics of those who self injure
  • Comparisons with earlier research
  • Imminent analyses
background
BACKGROUND
  • Deliberate self harm burdens the Australian health care system1
  • Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a type of self-harm
  • Causes distress for patients, families and therapists2
  • Is a risk factor for future self harm and suicide3,4
  • Differences between self injurers and suicide attempters ‘repulsion of life’ 5
  • No empirically proven treatments4
  • NSSI not understoodstigmatisation/social exclusion
  • Need more information about the problem
  • Difficult to measure in population compared to clinical samples

1Steenkamp et al 2000, 2Lindgren et al 2004, 3Garzotto et al. 1977, 4RANZCP 2004, 5Muehlenkamp et al. 2004

slide5
AIMS
  • Prevalence and nature of self injury in Australia
  • Differences between those who and do not self injure
  • Interactions between demographic, social and individual factors associated with self-injury and their relative importance
design sampling
DESIGN/SAMPLING

N=217

N=8285

N=3975

N=42,938

  • N=11,722
  • Non-connections (80.5%)
  • Non-residential (11.3%)
  • Fax/modem (7.7%)

N=3229

N=14688

N=10619

N=1093

Attempted CATI

N=31,216

  • N=19,206
  • Refusals 48.5%
  • Non-contact 7.5%
  • Language 2.3%
  • Incapacitated 2.9%
  • Terminated 0.6%
  • Unavailable 1.1%

12,010

12,006

survey
SURVEY

Alcohol intake, binge drinking, tobacco smoking, illegal drugs

  • GHQ-12
  • Dissociation (DES)
  • Emotion Regulation (ERQ)
  • Impulsivity/aggression (PIS)
  • Coping (COPE)
  • Alexithymia (TAS)

Telephone and internet

Neglect, sexual and physical abuse

Heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual, unsure

Freq, rec, sev, age onset, methods, medical att., stopping, how, who knew, help seeking

Ideation (GHQ-28)/attempts

Demographics: age, gender, education level, work status, postcode, suburb, country of birth, main language spoken at home, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander

survey1
SURVEY
  • Average survey time 14 mins
  • Interviewed in English, Italian, Greek, Vietnamese, Chinese and Arabic
  • Lifeline and Kids Help Line numbers were offered at the end of the survey
  • Parental consent required for those under 18
participants education marital status and ethnicity
PARTICIPANTS – EDUCATION, MARITAL STATUS AND ETHNICITY

Indigenous Australians

Females n=99 (0.8%)

Males n=57 (0.5%)

self injury by age and sex
SELF INJURY BY AGE AND SEX

Overall 12-month prevalence 1.7%

Overall lifetime

prevalence 8.3%

12 month proportions

Lifetime proportions

self injury indigenous status and mental health
SELF INJURY, INDIGENOUS STATUS AND MENTAL HEALTH

Indigenous (Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander) or Not Indigenous

Mental Health – GHQ12

methods and motivations
METHODS AND MOTIVATIONS

Methods

Motivations

comparisons with earlier research
COMPARISONS WITH EARLIER RESEARCH
  • In line with:
    • Ross & Heath, Laye-Gindhu et al., Patton et al., De Leo & Heller, adolescent samples, 12 month prevalence, females more likely to self injure
    • Hawton et al., Patton et al. & De Leo & Heller, adolescent samples, 12 month prevalence 4-6%
    • Ross & Heath, Muehlenkamp & Guttierrez, adolescent sample, lifetime prevalence 13-16% (our estimate was slightly lower)
    • Briere & Gil (1998), adult sample, no difference between genders
    • Muehlenkamp & Guttierrez, adolescent sample, lifetime prevalence, most common methods cutting and scratching
  • Lower prevalence than:
    • Laye-Gindhu et al. (13.2%; they included reckless behaviour), Ross & Heath (13.86%; lifetime, still higher), Muehlenkamp & Guttierrez (15.9 and 23.2%), Nada-Raja (23.5%), Hasking et al. (46%) and Lloyd-Richardson et al. (46.5%)
imminent analyses
Imminent analyses
  • Age standardisation
  • Social exclusion
  • Remoteness
  • Dissociation
  • Emotion regulation
  • Coping
  • Suicidal ideation
  • Suicide attempt
  • Neglect, sexual abuse, physical abuse
  • Sexual orientation
  • Substance use