including and serving immigrant families in early childcare n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Including and Serving Immigrant Families in Early Childcare PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Including and Serving Immigrant Families in Early Childcare

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 13

Including and Serving Immigrant Families in Early Childcare - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 161 Views
  • Uploaded on

Including and Serving Immigrant Families in Early Childcare. Alicia F. Lieberman Child Trauma Research Project University of California San Francisco San Francisco General Hospital. What Is Unique About Immigrants?. Linguistic discontinuity Unfamiliarity with institutions

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Including and Serving Immigrant Families in Early Childcare' - alexia


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
including and serving immigrant families in early childcare

Including and Serving Immigrant Families in Early Childcare

Alicia F. Lieberman

Child Trauma Research Project

University of California San Francisco

San Francisco General Hospital

what is unique about immigrants
What Is Unique About Immigrants?
  • Linguistic discontinuity
  • Unfamiliarity with institutions
  • Lack of comfort with new social mores
  • Different hierarchy of values
childhood adversity and minority status
Childhood Adversity and Minority Status
  • Minority children are more likely to be poor
  • Risk factors cluster around poverty
  • The impact of risk factors is cumulative
  • Minority children are more vulnerable to traumatic event due to cumulative effect of risk factors and less access to services

(Oser & Cohen, 2003; Flor U.S. Surgeon General’s Report, 2001)

as a result
As a Result…

“American Indians, Alaska Natives, African

Americans, Asian Americans, Pacific

Islanders, and Hispanic Americans bear a

disproportionately high burden of

disability from mental disorders.”

(The President’s New Freedom Commission Report, 2003)

when systems compound risk child welfare and foster care
When Systems Compound Risk: Child Welfare and Foster Care
  • No race differences in abuse and neglect reports
  • Children of color are:
    • more often placed out of home
    • subjected to more placement changes
    • kept longer in foster care
    • less likely to be reunified with parents

(Casey Family Programs Child Welfare Fact Sheet, 2005)

when systems compound risk juvenile justice placement
When Systems Compound Risk:Juvenile Justice Placement
  • Youth of color more likely to be arrested for same offenses as white
  • Projected 10-year increase in juvenile justice placement
    • White 3%
    • American Indian 17%
    • African American 19%
    • Latinos 59%
    • Asian/Pacific Islander 74%
  • (Leiber, 2002; Snyder & Sickmund, 1995, 1999)
what can we do take action
What Can We Do?Take Action
  • Early education: “Pre-K, starting at birth for

those who need it”*

  • Inter-system coordination in early

identification and mental health referral

(*Sam Meisels, 2006)

what can we do apply what we know
What Can We Do?Apply What We Know
  • Early intervention is most cost-effective,

regardless of immigration status

    • school readiness: decreases in drop-out rates
    • decreases in child abuse reports
    • decreases in unplanned pregnancies
    • increases in wage earnings
    • decreases in crime

(From Neurons to Neighborhoods, 2000; Karoly et al., 1998, 2005;

Lynch, 2005; Olds, 2002)

what can we do adopt helpful public policies
What Can We Do?Adopt Helpful Public Policies
  • Adopt policies that address the educational and health disparities of minority children and their families, regardless of immigration status
  • Fund to scale agencies and programs that address health, mental health childcare, education, family support, and child welfare regardless of immigration status
what can we do pursue cultural competence
What Can We Do? Pursue Cultural Competence
  • Community buy-in is crucial for success
  • Incorporate linguistic continuity
  • Understand the meaning of culturally different childrearing practices
  • Hire staff that reflect the population served
  • Fund training and leadership development
  • Include families/consumers from all cultures in planning and implementation
what can we do begin at the beginning
What Can We Do?Begin at the Beginning

Babies can’t wait, regardless of immigration status!

Children aged birth-five are particularly vulnerable

  • 85% of child abuse victims
  • Majority of child abuse fatalities
  • Most frequent witnesses of domestic violence

What babies learn now can last a lifetime: Respect their culture to nourish their emotional health!