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2008 Utah Oilseed Crop Performance Trial Pace*, M.G. and Israelsen, C. . Principal Investigators. Materials and Methods. Results. Michael Pace Extension Agent Utah State University 195 W 1100 S Brigham City UT 84302 435.734.9945 ext. 263 mike.pace@usu.edu Clark Israelsen

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2008 Utah Oilseed Crop Performance Trial

Pace*, M.G. and Israelsen, C.

Principal Investigators

Materials and Methods

Results

Michael Pace

Extension Agent

Utah State University

195 W 1100 S

Brigham City UT 84302

435.734.9945 ext. 263

mike.pace@usu.edu

Clark Israelsen

Extension Agent

Utah State University

179 North Main, Suite 111

Logan UT 84321

435.752.6263

clark.israelsen@usu.edu

Oilseed crops are ranked in decreasing order of gross income in Table 1. There were significant differences between crops in seed production as shown in Table 1 and in percent oil content, lbs. of oil produced and gross income as shown in Table 2.

Table 1. 2008 Utah Oilseed Crop Performance Trial Yields.

  • Plots were planted at the Greenville Experimental Farm at Utah State University in North Logan, Utah.
  • Plots were seeded with a small research plot drill on April 28, 2008.
    • Seeding rates were: Safflower 25 lbs./A, Yellow Mustard 15 lbs./A, Flax 65 lbs./A, Sunflower 4 lbs./A, and Camelina 8 lbs./A.
    • Individual plot sizes were 4.5 feet wide by 14 feet long.
    • 5 randomized complete blocks.

Planting the plots with small research planter

  • Plots were fertilized according to soil test results at 52 lbs. N/acre and 26 lbs. P/acre pre-plant.
  • 1.5 pts of Treflan® herbicide was applied pre-plant for weed control.
  • The plots received two 6-hr irrigations in June prior to flowering (4.5 total in.).

Abstract

Significance of F test <0.01

LSD (0.05) 767

LSD (0.30) 380

* Lbs. DM/A = Pounds of Dry Matter/Acre

** Gross income per acre is based on market value with no adjustment for quality. Income prices are based on 30¢ per lb for safflower, 33¢ per lb for flax, 43¢ per lb for mustard, 17¢ per lb for camelina. Income does not contain dockage for foreign material, stained seed, low test weights, harvester damage, etc.

a Birds damaged plots prior to harvest – no data collected

Safflower (Carthamustinctorius) has been a popular crop in Northern Utah as it can be grown on both irrigated and dryland farms. Annual Utah safflower production is valued at $1.9 million dollars and it is grown primarily for the birdseed market. When diesel fuel hit $4.00 a gallon in 2008, many growers in Utah became interested in growing oilseed crops for biofuel production, but were not familiar with the growing conditions and expected yields of various oilseed crops. The purpose of this project was to: 1) evaluate production yields of oilseed crops such as flax, yellow mustard, camelina, and sunflower under irrigated conditions in Northern Utah; 2) compare yields of the new oilseed crops to safflower, and 3) share the study results with growers at regional crops schools and field days. Replicated plots (randomized complete block design) were planted on April 28, 2008 in a Millville Silt Loam soil at the Greenville Research Farm in North Logan, Utah. 52 units of N, 26 units of P and Treflan® herbicide were applied pre-plant and incorporated into the plots. The plots received two 6 hr irrigations in June prior to flowering (4.5 total in. of water applied). Plots were harvested at various times throughout the season based on individual plant maturity. Seed production, percent oil content, pounds of oil produced and gross income per acre were recorded and analyzed. Research results showed production and yields of safflower had significantly greater yields, oil content, and gross income per acre as compared to the new oilseed crops tested.

Oilseed plots on June 24 prior to irrigation

Table 2. Oilseed Crops Ranked by Lbs. of Oil Produced

  • Yellow mustard and camelina were harvested on August 15; flax and safflower were harvested on October 1; sunflower was not harvested due to significant bird damage.
  • The percent oil content was determined by measuring seed that had been cleaned and was at 0% moisture after drying at 105o C for 24 hours in a forced-air drying oven.

* Lbs. DM/A = Pounds of Dry Matter/Acre

** Gross income per acre is based on market value with no adjustment for quality, saleable byproducts from the processing or for the processing costs figured into it. Income prices are based on .45¢ per lb for safflower & flax oil, .40¢ per lb of for camelina oil and .50¢ per lb of for mustard oil.

These results have been presented at 4 crop schools in Northern Utah (245 total participants) and to 18 USU Extension Agents to date.

Yellow mustard ready to harvest on August 15

Introduction and Objectives

  • The percent oil content was tested by Sathe Analytical Laboratory, Inc. in Williston, ND., according to laboratory standards.
  • Results were evaluated by an analysis of variance using Statistix 8.
  • Seed and oil prices were 2008 contract prices offered to local growers.

Conclusions

  • When diesel fuel rose to $4.00 a gallon in 2008, the potential profitability of growing oilseed crops was of interest to growers in Utah. The study was undertaken to gain new knowledge about oilseed production requirements and yields in Utah.
  • The main objectives of this project were to:
  • Evaluate oilseed crop performance under irrigated conditions in Northern Utah.
  • Compare production and yields of flax, yellow mustard, camelina, and sunflower to safflower, an oilseed crop already grown in Northern Utah.
  • 3. Educate growers about the potential of oilseed crops at regional crop schools and farm field days.
  • All of the oilseed crops evaluated can be grown in Northern Utah.
  • One year of research data showed that safflower grown for the birdseed or oil market is most productive and profitable for producers in Northern Utah.
  • Several additional years of testing are needed to verify seed production, percent oil content, average yields, and gross income for these new oilseed crops.
  • Producers acquired new knowledge from the information we shared at the crop schools.

Acknowledgments

A special thank you is extended to Bill Meadows, Mountain States Oilseeds; Utah Agricultural Experiment Station; Shryl and Justin Clawson, USU Plants Soils & Climate Dept.; for their advice, expertise and/or supplying seed for this trial.

Sunflowers on August 15