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TRENDS IN HOW PEOPLE USE THE INTERNET Lee Rainie Director – Pew Internet Project Public Radio Program Directors Clevelan PowerPoint Presentation
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TRENDS IN HOW PEOPLE USE THE INTERNET Lee Rainie Director – Pew Internet Project Public Radio Program Directors Cleveland, Ohio 9.16.09. New information ecosystem: Then and Now. Industrial Age Info was: Scarce Expensive Institutionally oriented Designed for consumption. Information Age

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TRENDS IN HOW PEOPLE USE THE INTERNET Lee Rainie Director – Pew Internet Project Public Radio Program Directors Clevelan


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  1. TRENDS IN HOW PEOPLE USE THE INTERNETLee RainieDirector – Pew Internet ProjectPublic Radio Program DirectorsCleveland, Ohio9.16.09

  2. New information ecosystem: Thenand Now Industrial Age Info was: Scarce Expensive Institutionally oriented Designed for consumption Information Age Info is: Abundant Cheap Personally oriented Designed for participation

  3. The internet is the asteroid: Thenand now 2000 46% of adults use internet 5% with broadband at home 50% own a cell phone 0% connect to internet wirelessly <10% use “cloud” = slow, stationary connections built around my computer 2009 79% of adults use internet 63% with broadband at home 85% own a cell phone 56% connect to internet wirelessly >two-thirds use “cloud” = fast, mobile connections built around outside servers and storage

  4. Media ecology – then (industrial age) Product Route to homeDisplayLocal storage TV stations phone TV Cassette/ 8-track broadcast TV radio broadcast radio stereo Vinyl album News mail Advertising newspaper delivery phone paper Radio Stations non-electronic Tom Wolzien, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co

  5. Media ecology – now (information age) Product Route to homeDisplayLocal storage cable TiVo (PVR) VCR TV stations DSL TV Satellite radio player Info wireless/phone radio DVD “Daily me” broadcast TV PC Web-based storage content books iPod /MP3 server/ TiVo (PVR) Cable Nets broadcast radio stereo PC Web sites satellite monitor web storage/servers Local news mail headphones CD/CD-ROM Content from express delivery pager satellite player cell phone memory individuals iPod / storage portable gamer MP3 player / iPod Peer-to-peer subcarriers / WIFI cell phone pagers - PDAs Advertising newspaper delivery cable box Radio stations camcorder/camera PDA/Palm game console game console paper Satellite radio e-reader / Kindle storage sticks/disks e-reader/Kindle Adapted from Tom Wolzien, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co

  6. Myth 1: Everyone is onlineReality: Digital gaps are persistent Pew Internet & American Life Project – April 2009 survey

  7. Myth 1: Everyone is onlineReality: Digital gaps are persistent Pew Internet & American Life Project – April 2009 survey

  8. Myth 1: Everyone is onlineReality: Digital gaps are persistent Pew Internet & American Life Project – April 2009 survey

  9. Myth 1: Everyone is onlineReality: Digital gaps are persistent Pew Internet & American Life Project – December 2008 survey

  10. Myth 1: Everyone is onlineReality: Digital gaps are persistent Pew Internet & American Life Project – April 2009 survey

  11. Myth 1: Everyone is onlineReality: Digital gaps are persistent Pew Internet & American Life Project – April 2009 survey

  12. Myth 2: Everyone is online every dayReality: Some are casual and infrequent users • 27% of internet users do NOT use the internet on an average day • More than 40% of those with home internet connections do NOTgo online every day • 28% of home broadband users do NOT go online every day • More than 30% of those with work internet connections do NOT go online every day Pew Internet & American Life Project – April 2009 survey

  13. Myth 3:Non-internet users are far removed from online lifeReality: Some are drop-outs, some are second-hand users • 21% of non-internet users were at one time in their lives internet users • No longer interested • Computer or connection didn’t work • Too expensive • Too frustrating • 13% of non-internet users live in households with internet connections – other members of the family use the internet in the house Pew Internet & American Life Project – April 2009 survey

  14. Myth 4: All non-users want to go onlineReality: Surprising numbers have no such wish • 86% of non-internet users say they have no desire to go online • Don’t want it • Don’t need it (don’t know what is helpful) • Can’t afford it • Like other methods of gathering information and communicating • Too complicated • Too scary Pew Internet & American Life Project – April 2009 survey

  15. Younger users dominate Games Social network sites Music downloading Job information Go online for fun/diversion Blog writing and reading Watching and creating video Participating in virtual worlds Instant messaging Older users dominate Health information Buying goods Banking Using government websites Religious information Twitter Weather Political news Myth 5: Younger users dominate the internetReality: In many cases, they don’t

  16. Generations are pretty equally engaged Myth 5: Younger users dominate the internetReality: In many cases, they don’t • Email • Search engines • Product research • News • Travel reservations • Job-related activities • Maps • Hobby information • Online classifieds • Auctions • Podcasts • Genealogy

  17. Information and media ecosystem changes • Volume of information grows • Variety of information increases • Velocity of information speeds up • The times and places to experience media enlarge • People’s vigilance for information expands AND contracts

  18. Information and media ecosystem changes • The immersive qualities of media are more compelling • Relevance of information improves • The number of information “voices” explodes – and the voices become “louder” and more findable • Voting and ventilating are enabled • Social networks are more vivid

  19. Behold Networked Individuals … those with a different sense of … • Expectation about access to, availability of, and pathways to information • Place, distance, presence, intimacy – it’s all ambient • Time use • The possibilities of work, learning, and play • The scalability of conversation and community • The persistence of “digital me” and “digital you” • Personal efficacy and the payoff for personal effort • Boundaries and contexts – public and private • The rewards and challenges of networking for social, economic, political, and cultural purposes – new layers and new audiences

  20. Behold Networked Individuals … those with a different way of getting the news

  21. People-Press news consumer typology Behold Networked Individuals … those with a different way of getting the news

  22. A general new pattern of communication and influence – the 4 As • attention • acquisition • assessment • action

  23. How do you…. • get his/her attention? • leverage your traditional platforms and narrative style • offer alerts, updates, feeds • be available in relevant places • find pathways through his/her social network

  24. How do you…. • help him/her acquire information? • be findable in a “long tail” world • pursue new distribution methods • offer “link love” for selfish reasons – you want joint referrals • participate in conversations about your work

  25. How do you…. • help him/her assess information? • honor the ethics of your kind of data and culture • be transparent, link-friendly, and archive everything • aggregate the best related work • when you make mistakes seek forgiveness

  26. How do you…. • assist him/her act on information? • offer opportunities for feedback • offer opportunities for remixing and mash-ups • offer opportunities for community building • be open to the wisdom of crowds

  27. A handy tech-user typology http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2009/5-The-Mobile-Difference--Typology.aspx

  28. What we measured • Assets • Actions • Attitudes

  29. 39% are motivated by mobility 5 groups that are being drawn into deeper use thanks to mobile connections Wireless connections prompt them to use the internet more and feel better and better about its role in their lives Self expression and networking matters to them, but some have mixed feelings 61% are tied to stationary media 5 groups that do not feel the pull of mobility – or anything else – drawing them deeper in the digital world Some have lots of technology, but it is relatively peripheral in their lives They have plateaued in internet use and enthusiasm -- or are on the outskirts of digital life Overall picture

  30. Motivated by mobility – Group 1Digital collaborators(8% of population) Tech lifestyle attributes With the most tech assets, Digital Collaborators use them to work with and share their creations with others. The lead the pack in every dimension of our analysis: assets, actions, attitudes towards technology. Always-on broadband and always-present cell connection is key to their lives. These veteran users are enthusiastic about how ICTs help them connect with others and confident in how to manage digital devices and information.

  31. Motivated by mobility – Group 1Digital collaborators(8% of population) Demographics • Male: 56% • Median age: 39 • Race: Diverse • Education: 61% college + • Household income: 53% make > $75K • Employment status: 70% employed FT • Community type: 52% suburb; 36% urb. • Funky facts: 12 years online 73% married 51% parents minor children

  32. Motivated by mobility – Group 1Digital collaborators(8% of population) Important because • They are your most consistent, prime consumers • They are early adopters • They are most potent influentials • They are evangelists and their word of mouth really, really matters • When you want to explore new editorial direction, they will give you feedback

  33. Motivated by mobility – Group 1Digital collaborators(8% of population) How to be a node in their network • Stay true to your kind of story telling but use multiple platforms • News to them is instrumental (important to their lives) and a social lubricant (driveway moments matter to them) • Give them the tools to collaborate and share • Enlist their help in giving you coaching and feedback on the experiments with technology you want to try

  34. Motivated by mobility – Group 2Ambivalent networkers (7% of population) Tech lifestyle attributes Ambivalent Networkers have folded mobile devices into how they run their social lives, whether though texting or social networking tools online. They tie for first or take second in all assets and actions categories. They also rely on ICTs for entertainment. But they also express worries about connectivity; and some find that mobile devices are intrusive. Many think it is good to take a break from online use. Their keyword about technology might be “obligation” – can’t afford to be off the grid, even though they want to be.

  35. Motivated by mobility – Group 2Ambivalent networkers (7% of population) Demographics • Male: 60% • Median age: 29 (youngest) • Race: Little more minority than DigCollab. • Education: 23% college + • Household income: 44% make < $50K • Employment status: 64% employed FT • Community type: 44% suburb; 45% urb. • Funky facts: 30% are students 34% are NOT email users 83% are cell texters

  36. Motivated by mobility – Group 2Ambivalent networkers (7% of population) Important because • They are tomorrow’s primary customers and influencers • They like you but haven’t yet solidified the bond • They are the “net newsers” who prefer the internet to other news sources and will care about your online offerings

  37. Motivated by mobility – Group 2Ambivalent networkers (7% of population) How to be a node in their network • Think of yourself as a sanctuary where they can linger and focus on stories • Help them navigate through information overload – aggregate and filter for them • Think about ways to reach them through games -- 54% of them own video game console • Help them feel less of an “obligation” to encounter your material

  38. Motivated by mobility – Group 3Media movers (7% of population) Tech lifestyle attributes Media Movers have a wide range of online and mobile habits, and they like to find or create an information nugget, such as a digital photo, and pass it on. These social exchanges are central to this group’s use of ICTs – rather than work-related uses. Cyberspace as a path to personal productivity or an outlet for creativity is less important. They are not into online content creation the way Digital Collaborators are, yet they are big-time sharers.

  39. Motivated by mobility – Group 3Media movers (7% of population) Demographics • Male: 56% • Median age: 34 (second youngest) • Race: Diverse • Education: 32% college+ (average) • Household income: 56% make > $50K • Employment status: 70% employed FT • Community type: 55% suburb; 30% urb. • Funky facts: 31% record video on cell 87% own dig. camera 90% online health seekers

  40. Motivated by mobility – Group 3Media movers (7% of population) Important because • They are eager social networkers who pass along your material • They add to the diversity of your audience

  41. Motivated by mobility – Group 3Media movers (7% of population) How to be a node in their network • Help them find outlets for sharing their creations – maybe simple mashup tools • Help them navigate to material that they can pass along to others • They are socializers, so social networking is an experience for “making connections” for them and your material is social currency for them

  42. Motivated by mobility – Group 4Roving nodes (9% of population) Tech lifestyle attributes Roving Nodes are active managers of their social and work lives using their mobile device. They get the most out of basic applications with their assets – such as email or texting – and find them great for arranging the logistics of their lives and enhancing personal productivity. They love email and texting, but are too busy to blog or create other content. Think “working Little League mother”, or caregiver for aging parent when you think of Roving Nodes

  43. Motivated by mobility – Group 4Roving nodes (9% of population) Demographics • Female: 56% • Median age: 39 • Race: Diverse > Latino • Education: 44% college+ (2nd highest) • Household income: 52% make > $50K • Employment status: 68% employed FT • Community type: 48% suburb; 39% urb. • Funky facts: 100% have cell phones heavy internet use at home and work – hard to give up say tech gives them control

  44. Motivated by mobility – Group 4Roving nodes (9% of population) Important because • They are relatively eager audience members and are often your most engaged female consumers • They are good indicators of the tolerances of your audience for editorial changes • If they like what you have changed they will give you more attention

  45. Motivated by mobility – Group 4Roving nodes (9% of population) How to be a node in their network • Help them be efficient generally – and especially as parents • They appreciate “push” functions like alerts, reminders • Cloud functions are particularly useful to them because they can be accessed “on the go”

  46. Motivated by mobility – Group 5Mobile newbies (8% of population) Tech lifestyle attributes This group rates low on tech assets, but its members really like their cell phones. Mobile Newbies, many of whom acquired a cell in the past year, like how the device helps them be more available to others. The act of getting a cell phone was like a conversion experience for them in the way it opened up the world. They would be hard pressed to give up the cell phone. And they express general support for the role technology can play in people’s lives even though most do NOT use the internet.

  47. Motivated by mobility – Group 5Mobile newbies (8% of population) Demographics • Female: 55% • Median age: 50 (oldest MBM group) • Race: A bit weighted to minorities • Education: 72% HS or less • Household income: 45% make <$40K • Employment status: 53% employed FT • Community type: 24% rural • Funky facts: just 39%=internet users 46% use computers none create internet content love new connectedness

  48. Motivated by mobility – Group 5Mobile newbies (8% of population) Important because • They greatly diversify your audience • They are traditionally under-served media market

  49. Motivated by mobility – Group 5Mobile newbies (8% of population) How to be a node in their network • Easy interfaces matter to them • Offer “how-to” material, coaching, and mentoring • Offer pathways to the wonders of the web. They are just getting their feet wet and do not know much about the useful and fun stuff they can find online

  50. Stationary media majority – Group 1Desktop veterans (13% of population) Tech lifestyle attributes This group of older, veteran online users is content to use a high-speed connection and a desktop computer to explore the internet and stay in touch with friends. They are happy to be connected with they are stationary and sitting. So, they place their cell phone and mobile applications in the background. For them, online life hit its zenith about 3-5 years ago when they first got broadband connections. And their 2004 cell phone still serves its primary purpose for them – making phone calls.