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T & EA M Orientation “ T ogether E veryone A chieves M ore”. Welcome to the Good Spirit School Division & our TEAM Orientation Package. To start the orientation – please ensure that you are in “Slide Show Mode”

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    Presentation Transcript
    t ea m orientation t ogether e veryone a chieves m ore
    T & EA M Orientation“Together Everyone Achieves More”
    • Welcome to the Good Spirit School Division & our TEAM Orientation Package. To start the orientation – please ensure that you are in “Slide Show Mode”
    • This self-guided orientation program is designed to occur in your first month of employment with the GSSD.
      • Week 1: Please complete Module 1 – This is the EA-Only Component of the Program. For this module, one should complete the following:
        • The Pre-Test
        • Lessons 1-8
        • Workbook Module 1
        • To begin Module 1 – Please click here.
      • Week 2: With your teacher partner, please complete Module 2. For this module, one should complete the following:
        • Lessons 9-14 (Including viewing of the video)
        • Workbook Module 2– Sections 1-4
        • To begin Module 2 with your teacher partner – Please click here.
      • Week 3: With your teacher partner, please complete Module 3. For this module, one should complete the following:
        • Lessons 15 – 20
        • Workbook Module 3 – Sections 1-3
        • TEAM Post-Test
        • To begin Module 3 with your teacher partner – Please click here.
    t ea m orientation t ogether e veryone a chieves m ore module 1 educational assistant time 1 hour
    T & EA M Orientation“Together Everyone Achieves More”Module 1: Educational Assistant – Time: 1 Hour

    To view each module, simply click on the box and you will be directed to the appropriate slide.

    t ea m orientation t ogether e veryone a chieves m ore module 2 teacher ea time 1 5 hours
    T & EA M Orientation“Together Everyone Achieves More”Module 2: Teacher & EA - Time: 1.5 hours

    To view each module, simply click on the box and you will be directed to the appropriate slide.

    t ea m orientation t ogether e veryone a chieves m ore module 3 teacher ea time 1 1 5 hours
    T & EA M Orientation“Together Everyone Achieves More”Module 3: Teacher & EA - Time: 1- 1.5 hours

    To view each module, simply click on the box and you will be directed to the appropriate slide.

    welcome to the gssd strong foundations bright futures
    Welcome to the GSSD“Strong Foundations….Bright Futures”

    Click on the picture to hear a welcome message and brief description of her role from Diana Welter, Human Resources Manager with the Good Spirit School Division

    Click on the picture to hear a welcome message from Dwayne Reeve, Director of Education with the Good Spirit School Division

    gssd general information
    GSSD General Information
    • GSSD Website (www.gssd.ca)
    • GSSD Organizational Chart
    • School year calendar
      • What days do I work?
        • Educational Assistants work all numbered days on the school calendar as per your contract and,
        • Up to three extra days (called “Flex time”) as directed by your school principal. This time is “flexible” – examples of flex time may include hours to attend meetings afterschool, hours to support students’ participation in extra-curricular activities or to participate in staff activities on non-numbered school days. For a full description of Flex Time, please refer to the linked document from Human Resources.
    • Timesheets, Supervision & Sick Days
    • School contact list
    • For additional information, please speak with staff at your school and/or speak with Human Resources.
    • Additional union - specific information may be found in the GSSD – CUPE 4784 Agreement located here and on the GSSD website. If your school does require you to join a union, please speak to Christine Hawley in Payroll (306-786-4752)
    timesheets supervision sick days
    Timesheets, Supervision & Sick Days
    • Timesheets
        • Indicate Total Hours worked each month.
        • Need to be completed on a monthly basis – typically the school secretary will ask you to complete and sign your timesheet each month. Click here to see a sample timesheet.
    • Sick Days – What should you do if you are sick?
        • Please ask your school principal for school-specific protocols for coverage if you are ill or require a leave from your EA duties & responsibilities.
        • Click here to view the Request for Leave Form – this form is available on the GSSD Website – in the forms section.
    • Additional Hours Form & Time in Lieu Option (please note that both of these options require pre-approval from your school principal).
    • Noon-Hour Supervision & Extra-curricular Supervision Form - For further information – please speak to your school principal.
    • What happens if I get injured at work?
        • First & foremost access medical assistance if needed.
        • As soon as possible, inform your school principal of the incident.
        • Following this discussion, please complete the Employee Accident/Injury Report Form.
    gssd general information1
    GSSD General Information
    • Tour of the GSSD Website (www.gssd.ca)
    • GSSD Organizational Chart
    • School year calendar
      • What days do I work?
        • Educational Assistants work all numbered days on the school calendar as per your contract and,
        • Up to three extra days (called “Flex time”) as directed by your school principal. This time is “flexible” – examples of flex time may include hours to attend meetings afterschool, hours to support students’ participation in extra-curricular activities or to participate in staff activities on non-numbered school days.
    • Timesheets, Supervision & Sick Days
    • School contact list
    • For additional information, please speak with staff at your school and/or speak with Human Resources.
    • Additional union - specific information may be found in the GSSD – CUPE 4784 Agreement located here and on the GSSD website. If your school does require you to join a union, please speak to Christine Hawley in Payroll (306-786-4752)
    t ea m orientation t ogether e veryone a chieves m ore1
    T & EA M Orientation“Together Everyone Achieves More”
    • Pre-Test
      • To complete the Pre-Test – You have two options
        • If you have internet access, please click here and you will automatically connected to the test.
        • If you are not connected to the internet, please complete the pre-test in your orientation binder. Following completion of the package, please ensure that all paperwork is forwarded to your school’s Student Services Coordinator.
    who what is student services
    Who & What is Student Services?
    • GSSD Student Services Organizational Chart
    • Student Services Areas indicating the Student Services Coordinator (SSC) for your area.
    • Student Services Vision
    • GSSD Inclusive Education Vision
      • What is inclusion? Click here to see a video describing inclusion.
      • Is inclusion beneficial? Click here to see a video describing the benefits of inclusion for all.
      • Click here for an excellent article describing ways to provide support in an inclusive classroom (Causton-Theoharis, 2009).
    characteristics of inclusive schools
    Characteristics of Inclusive Schools
    • Following review of the GSSD vision of inclusive education & your viewing of the videos, please take a moment to answer the following question and document your answers in the orientation handout:
    • Question:
      • Inclusion of all students in the classroom is successful if ___________________?
    slide14
    Duties & Responsibilities of Educational AssistantsFor full information, please click to Administrative Procedure 431

    In your workbook, please discuss and document what you feel are the primary duties and responsibilities of the Educational Assistant in the classroom.

    Following this delineation of roles, ask questions and discuss strengths and weaknesses in completing these roles and responsibilities.

    slide15
    Duties & Responsibilities of Educational AssistantsFor full information, please click to Administrative Procedure 431

    Assist with the delivery of instructional and other direct services as assigned and developed by professional practitioners.

    Assist in data collection to determine student progress

    Support the instructional team.

    Work to ensure the safety of students and staff.

    Assist with classroom management under the direction of the classroom teacher.

    Facilitate activities of daily living and personal care (as directed) to enable the full participation of all students in all aspects of the school experience.

    Other activities as directed.

    slide16

    In summary, as roles have changed, it is important to discuss what it specifically means to assist and support the classroom teacher in providing services to students. Appropriate Roles for EAs MAY include:

    Work individually or with groups of students on concepts that have been previously taught by the teacher.

    Read out loud or listen to students read.

    Assist with supplementary work

    Provide special help such as drilling with flash cards, spelling or play activities – as directed by the Classroom teacher.

    Prepare instructional materials

    Reinforce learning in small groups.

    Assist children with personal care

    Assist children in learning self-care tasks – as directed by the classroom teacher.

    Supervise free-play, lunch, or recess

    Report observations to the classroom teacher.

    Assist with supervision during field trips, community instruction, & assemblies.

    Score objective tests – under the specific direction of the classroom teacher.

    As requested, attend and participate in PPP meetings.

    Support the inclusion of students in the classroom.

    Assist in data collection, functional assessment activities, document student performance, and behaviours – and liaise this information with the classroom teacher.

    appropriate roles for eas may not include
    Appropriate Roles for EAs may NOT include:

    Teaching of new concepts or skills.

    Being given full responsibility for planning for students’ instructional or personal needs.

    Creating or prescribing educational activities or materials for students.

    Being given responsibility for clerical duties that are already assigned to other staff in the building.

    Being solely responsible for a classroom or other professional service.

    Being responsible for preparing lesson plans or assigning grades.

    Discussing student progress with parents.

    Being asked to attend a PPP meeting in place of the classroom teacher.

    primary roles and responsibilities of teachers cts ssts in working with eas
    Primary Roles and Responsibilities of Teachers (CTs & SSTs) in working with EAs

    Assess student entry level performance in all domains of functioning.

    Design and plan instruction for individual students – this includes adapting instructional materials to meet students’ needs.

    Implement program plans to achieve student specific goals and objectives.

    Coordinate, guide, and supervise EAs. This includes providing EAs with the necessary information, training and direction to fulfill their assigned responsibilities.

    Evaluate and report student progress.

    Communicate progress with parents/caregivers.

    Involve parents in their child’s education.

    Liaise with outside agencies to support the goal achievement of students.

    Coordinate and manage the information provided by other professionals.

    team introductory video
    TEAM Introductory Video
    • For this section of the orientation, we ask that you please play the enclosed video entitled “Paraeducators Quality Supervision & Training” featuring Dr. Nancy K. French.
      • The total length of the video is 35 minutes.
    • As a team, it is strongly encouraged to pause the video to discuss the questions written in the workbook as they appear (please note that this is not all of the questions on this video).
    • For questions about evaluation (posed at 8min, 50 seconds in the video), the GSSD does complete an evaluation of Educational Assistants each year. The evaluation is completed by the School Principal in consultation with school staff. The form we use may be found on the GSSD Website in the Forms Section or by clicking here.
    10 characteristics of effective teams
    10 Characteristics of Effective Teams
    • All teams are unique. Teams include two or more individuals that organize themselves to regularly plan, instruct and evaluate programming for students. In the school environment, teams may include students, parents, teachers, administrators, therapists, counsellors, psychologists, extended family members, and outside agency personnel.
    10 characteristics of effective teams1
    10 Characteristics of Effective Teams:
    • Communicating for clarity
      • All team members must be willing to share information, ideas, and points of view.
      • Requires skills in giving information, asking questions, and receiving information.
      • As a TEAM, following review of the 10 Characteristics of Effective Teams, there will be an opportunity to discuss together:
        • What are some of the priorities for each student that the EA will be working with?
        • How will information on program planning and instructional support be communicated?
          • If desired, two wonderful planning resources entitled “Curriculum Modification Workplan” & “Student Support Plan Worksheet” may be found in your workbooks and/or by clicking on the titles.
    10 characteristics of effective teams2
    10 Characteristics of Effective Teams:
    • Co-operation
      • Co-operation means to operate together.
      • Effective teams know what needs to be done and who will do it
      • Effective teams work together and look for ways to support and complement others.
    10 characteristics of effective teams3
    10 Characteristics of Effective Teams:
    • Coordination
      • As a team works together, the team organizes their contributions to maximize the effectiveness of each others’ work.
      • Effective teams share responsibilities and follow through on tasks to the best of their abilities.
    10 characteristics of effective teams4
    10 Characteristics of Effective Teams:
    • Collaboration
      • Essentially collaboration is a sharing of the labour.
      • Effective teams are committed to achieving goals
      • Effective teams work together to problem solve & reduce barriers to achieving success.
      • Individuals on effective teams feel that their unique strengths are valued, appreciated and utilized, and that their weaknesses are supported.
      • Soon, you will have an opportunity as a TEAM to discuss collaboration further.
    10 characteristics of effective teams5
    10 Characteristics of Effective Teams:
    • Consistency
      • Team members work diligently to implement plans and programs as directed in a consistent manner.
      • Efforts are made to reduce duplication of services.
    confronting problems compromising consensus decision making
    Confronting problems, compromising & consensus decision making
    • All members of effective teams recognize that problem identification and problem solving are fundamental responsibilities.
      • At this time, as a TEAM, discuss your typical style of dealing with conflict and mutually discuss how you plan to resolve conflicts. Document this plan in the orientation handout.
      • If you run into conflict, an excellent 5-step process for resolving conflict may be found by clicking above. A copy of this process may also be found in your orientation manual.
    caring commitment
    Caring & Commitment

    All team members care and feel commitment, not only to the students that they have the privilege of working with, but to other individuals on the school team.

    collaboration
    Collaboration:

    The most central element to successful programming for students with an intellectual or multiple disability is collaborative team work. It is a catalyst for inclusion, teacher empowerment and developing individualized instruction. The collaborative process provides the opportunity to merge unique skills, foster positive interdependence, develop creative problem solving and enhance accountability for individual responsibilities.

    Creating Opportunities

    collaboration1
    Collaboration

    At this time, as a TEAM, please take a moment to independently complete the Role Perception Activity (may be found in your TEAM orientation package and by clicking on the highlighted title above).

    Following independent completion of the worksheet, score your results by completing the Role Perception Score Sheet together.

    To end, complete the Inventory of Paraprofessional Skills and Teacher Needsand together discuss the results.

    personal program plans ppps
    Personal Program Plans (PPPs)
    • What is a Personal Program Plan (PPP)?
    • Who needs a PPP?
    • Why are personal program plans developed?
      • For an entertaining way to learn this information, please click here to view a video from Sarah Palin & Larry King exploring what a PPP is and who benefits from one in Saskatchewan.
      • Click here to view a blank PPP Template.
    what is a personal program plan
    What is a Personal Program Plan?

    A Personal Program Plan (PPP) is a written document developed and implemented by a collaborative team.  It is a compilation of student outcomes that have the highest priority for the student during the year.  It includes:

    • student identification and background information;
    • student strengths, needs and preferences;
    • current levels of performance;
    • annual student outcomes (SMART Goals - Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant & Timely);
    • short-term objectives or indicators (specific, measurable, achievable, relevant & timely);
    • strategies and resources;
    • team members who will implement the PPP, and the frequency, duration and location for implementation;
    • plans for evaluation and review;
    • procedures for reporting;
    • plans for transitions; and
    • signatures of team members.
    who needs a ppp
    Who needs a PPP?
    • A PPP is required for students who:
      • are working on learning outcomes that differ from those in provincial curricula for their grade level;
      • require continuing interventions and individualized supports beyond the Adaptive Dimension; or
      • have been identified as requiring intensive supports level 1 or 2. 
    • Please note that:
      • Every student who requires a PPP will not meet criteria for intensive supports. 
      • All students identified with intensive needs require a PPP
    why are personal program plans developed
    Why are personal program plans developed?

    PPPs provide annual and short term objectives and indicators that support outcome-focused educational programming for students.

    In short, they keep us accountable to ensuring success for all students.

    If you are working with a student on a PPP, please review their PPP document and please ensure that you are aware of components that you are responsible for.

    emergency procedures
    Emergency Procedures
    • Student Emergencies
        • Asthma
        • Allergies
        • Seizures
        • Bee Stings
        • Nose Bleeds
        • Diabetes Shock
      • Please ensure that you discuss with the school principal the school-specific procedures for addressing student emergencies.
      • Most schools also have posters discussing the emergent needs of students with asthma, allergies and diabetes. Take time to read these posters and ensure that you would know what the emergent signs of distress are and the delineated plans for addressing the emergency.
      • For students with seizures, we ask that all students have the following forms completed and included in their PPP. The documents include:
        • Seizure Action Plan
        • Seizure Parent Questionnaire
        • Seizure Observation Record.
      • If you are working with a student who has seizures, please review the information in these forms and discuss the school intervention plan with the child’s teacher.
    emergency procedures1
    Emergency Procedures
    • Occupational Health & Safety
      • Each school has an Occupational Health & Safety Committee.
      • It is important for you to know that The Occupational Health and Safety Act, 1993, and Regulations require everyone in the workplace to work together to identify and control health and safety hazards.
      • Since employers have the most control over the conditions of work and how it is done, they have the greatest degree of responsibility for the health and safety of workers.
      • Employers are also required to have a copy of The Occupational Health and Safety Act, 1993 and the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, 1996 readily available to both workers and management.
    • A copy of the Act and Regulations are available at each school. Please speak to your school principal to access these documents.
    • If you would like further information on Occupational Health and Safety in Saskatchewan, please click on the link and you will be directed there.
    emergency procedures2
    Emergency Procedures
    • Fire & Evacuation Procedures
      • Each school will have fire and emergency evacuation procedures.
      • Your school will prepare for a fire or other emergency procedure with drills. These happen at least 10 times per year.
      • As each procedure is school specific, please speak to your school principal to learn the evacuation procedures for your school. In addition to learning where your class is expected to go, ensure that you also learn procedures for the gym, library, and any other room in the school.
      • It is also important to ask for specific directions if you work with an individual who is sensitive to loud noises (some students will flee or become agitated and aggressive when exposed to loud noises), or for a student with mobility challenges. As a TEAM, ensure that you have a procedure that enables all to be safe at school.
    emergency procedures3
    Emergency Procedures
    • Maltreatment, Vulnerability & Duty to Report
    • Students with disabilities are vulnerable to abuse and neglect.
      • As an adult, you are a mandatory reporter.
      • You must report suspected neglect or abuse to your immediate supervisor or school principal.
      • If you have questions, the school counsellor or school principal are excellent resources.
      • Maltreatment includes neglect, physical abuse, mental injury, or sexual abuse.
    what is independence how can i promote it in the students that i work with
    What is independence & how can I promote it in the students that I work with?
    • Completing tasks “all by myself” is a key component of one’s quality of life.
    • In January 2010, GSSD paraprofessionals had the privilege of listening to Dr. Wanda Lyons speak to us on “Promoting Student Independence”.
      • At this presentation, Dr. Lyons discussed 7 strategies for promoting independence in all students. These strategies include:
        • Setting realistic expectations and providing tasks at or just above the student’s current skill level.
        • Using natural supports.
        • Using visual supports and organizers
        • Teach skills for self-determination
        • Facilitate social interaction
        • Teach strategies & always plan to reduce the amount of assistance provided.
    promoting independence with realistic expectations
    Promoting independence with realistic expectations
    • Realistic expectations require:
      • Knowledge of the student’s current level of performance. Within this activity, note what the student can do independently and then provide a “just right challenge”.
      • Knowledge of the goals and objectives on the personal program plan.
      • Ability to identify when the task needs to be broken down into smaller components (task analysis).
      • To assist the team in planning for independence, please use the “Planning for Student Independence” handout.
    promoting independence with natural supports
    Promoting independence with natural supports.

    The concept of natural supports is based on the understanding that relying on typical people and environments enhances the potential for inclusion more effectively than relying on specialized services and personnel.

    • Natural supports include:
      • Staff roles (e.g. Teaming, teachers from other grade levels, counsellors)
      • Curriculum and instructional strategies (e.g. Cooperative learning, adaptations, changes in expectations).
      • Time (e.g. Extra time, scheduling considerations).
      • Space (e.g. Layout of classroom, placement within class, cooling off area)
      • Parents (e.g. As guest speakers for disability awareness, information).
      • Peers (e.g. Peer assistance/buddies, peer tutoring, cooperative learning).
      • Materials include signs, organized work space, easy to access materials, adaptations, natural environment for teaching life skills.
    promoting independence using visual strategies supports
    Promoting independence using visual strategies & supports
    • Using a visual schedule to promote independence.
      • Click here to watch a video on using picture and object schedules in the classroom.
      • Click here to see a sample of how visuals can be used to teach a skill & enhance independence with a task.
    promoting independence with visual strategies supports
    Promoting independence with Visual Strategies & Supports

    Visuals are a type of natural support

    A student can use them for as long as they need to process information

    Helps the student to focus

    Taps into relative strengths in concrete thinking, rote memory, and understanding visual-spatial relationships

    Compensates for difficulties in abstract thinking, communication & attention.

    Sample High school Visual

    visual schedules
    Visual Schedules
    • Provide information about:
      • Events (what) and when?
    • Benefits:
      • Ease transitions
      • Creates opportunities for choice making
      • Fosters independence
      • Are accessible to students
      • Manages leisure time
      • Enhances Quality of Life.
    excellent resources for visual strategies
    Excellent Resources for Visual Strategies

    SetBC visual training resource

    PictureSet

    Boardmaker Share

    Speaking of Speech – Materials Exchange

    promoting independence by teaching skills for self determination
    Promoting independence by teaching skills for self-determination
    • Self determination means to have input into the decisions that affect our lives.
    • Important to start early by teaching the student to:
      • Set goals
      • Identify options and make choices
      • Accept responsibility
      • Communicate preferences or needs
      • Monitor and evaluate own progress
      • Identify and use natural supports.
    promoting independence by facilitating social interaction
    Promoting independence by facilitating social interaction

    Watch for budding relationships & foster their development.

    Recruit students to “show the student the ropes”

    Assist peers in problem solving collaboratively.

    promote independence by implementing strategies
    Promote independence by implementing strategies
    • Basic Steps:
      • Explain
      • I do it.
      • We do it together.
      • You do it!
    promote independence by implementing strategies1
    Promote independence by implementing strategies

    As a TEAM, take a moment to develop or discuss a present independence goal for one of the students that you have the privilege of working with.

    Which strategies will you employ?

    How and when will you begin to diminish supports?

    maintaining confidentiality
    Maintaining Confidentiality
    • It is very important to maintain student confidentiality at school. One should NEVER discuss a student with anyone except those directly involved with the student (classroom teacher of student, school principal, student support teacher, student services coordinator).
    • Should a discussion need to occur regarding a student, ENSURE that the following occurs:
      • It occurs in a private area with doors closed and not where others may hear what is being discussed.
      • Discussions should NEVER take place in public places such as grocery stores, sports arenas, bowling alleys, swimming pools, churches, restaurants, social media sites such as Facebook., email, or a cell phone.
      • Never discuss information about one student with the parents of another student.
      • Do not create personal files on a student or family.
      • If you have been directed to keep notes on the student, please ask where they should be kept to maintain confidentiality.
    maintaining confidentiality1
    Maintaining Confidentiality

    If a parent has a question or complaint, always direct them to the classroom teacher.

    general ethical considerations to note
    General Ethical Considerations to Note
    • To maintain ethics, practice the following:
      • Maintain your own wellness, composure, and emotional stability while working with students.
      • Always present yourself as a positive role mode for students. Represent the GSSD in a positive manner.
      • Understand the value of a team approach to the delivery of instructional services.
      • Always follow the directions of your professional supervisor.
      • Provide accurate information about students to those who need the information.
      • If you have concerns about a staff member; discuss those concerns directly with that person. Remember to follow the chain of command (colleague then school principal).
    • Discuss a student’s progress or educational program only with the teachers or staff who are responsible for that student’s instruction.
    • Respect the legal and human rights of children & youth.
    • Respect parental rights.
    • Participate in continuing staff development and self-improvement.
    • Know school policies and procedures.
    • Arrive promptly and follow the daily schedule.
    • Dress appropriately.
    • Manage time efficiently during the work day.
    • Model the teaching and behavioural management techniques demonstrated by the teacher.
    documentation
    Documentation
    • As a TEAM, discuss what type of communication system you would like to explore in the classroom.
      • How will you know what to do and what adaptations to employ?
        • To support this planning, one can employ the Curriculum Modification Workplan Form,The Instructional Support Plan Form or the Discussion of Prompting Strategies Document.Copies of each of these forms may be found here or in your manual.
      • How will you track progress?
      • How often will you meet to discuss students? When in the schedule will this occur?
      • How will you document behaviours and other spontaneous incidents?
        • To support the documentation of spontaneous incidents, aSample Documentation Formmay be found here.
      • Discuss as a team where you will keep your documentation?
    • Strive for all your documentation to include objective (what you can see, hear, taste, feel, smell) information.
    common pitfall over supporting staying too close to a student
    Common Pitfall: Over supporting & staying too close to a student
    • The video discussed different roles for EAs in a variety of settings. Regardless of the setting, one common pitfall that EAs run into is working in close proximity to a student and over-supporting them. Ensure that you avoid this pitfall as it can have long-term negative implications for a student.
    • “Too close” may include the following behaviours:
      • maintaining physical contact with the student (e.g.: shoulder, back, arms, hands) on a near constant basis
      • sitting in a chair immediately next to the student
      • Having the student sitting on the assistant’s lap while the classmates are sitting on the floor
      • Having the assistant accompany the student to virtually all areas of the school. Including the classrooms, hallways, bathrooms, and school grounds etc.
    • As teachers and assistants work as a TEAM, the question on all team members minds should be what is the next step to independence. In our next module, we will review strategies to promote independence for all of our students.
    common pitfall over supporting staying too close to a student1
    Common Pitfall: Over supporting & staying too close to a student
    • What are the negative ramifications of working in close proximity to a student?
      • interference of ownership and responsibility by classroom teachers
      • separation from classmates
      • dependence on adults
      • interference with peer interactions
      • limited opportunities for instruction from other teachers
      • loss of student’s personal control
      • loss of gender identity; this is most commonly observed when a male student is taken into the women’s bathroom by a female assistant (boys should use the boy’s washroom)
    how do we avoid this common pitfall
    How do we avoid this common pitfall?
    • The ideal inclusive environment is one where all students have the support of each other, of the teacher, and of the assistant. Support that is too individual and too intrusive can interfere with potential connections among students. The assistant’s role may be expanded to include:
      • supporting small group work. The small group could possibly include the student with intensive support needs; in which case, peer interdependence can be nurtured
      • assisting the teacher with supervising cooperative learning or other peer collaboration groups
      • working, at some point, with all students in the class
      • working with the large class group while the teacher spends individual time with the student with intensive support needs.
    challenging situations
    Challenging Situations
    • Please choose on of the following scenarios to read and discuss with your TEAM.
        • Click on one of the scenarios below and you will be directed to the case scenario.
          • Student to student dilemma
          • Outside agency dilemma
          • Working with community helpers
    challenging situations student to student
    Challenging Situations: Student to Student

    Sue is a new EA at Smith High school. She is 20 years of age. Sue went to school at Smith High School as a student, so she knows many of the teachers and several of the students. Her primary responsibilities are related to supporting two students with intensive support needs in several classrooms.

    Sue is trying to figure out how to support the two students in their history class. She is very frustrated and has decided to solicit input from several other students in the class. She meets with the student’s classmates during her lunch break and describes to the students without intensive support needs what she believes are the challenges and the learning priorities of the students with intensive support needs. The students generate a wide variety of strategies that may potentially be supportive of the students with intensive support needs. At the end of the lunch break, Sue feels very excited that very positive about the outcome of this informal chat. As a matter of fact, she decides to have lunch with these students once per week to solicit their ideas and feedback related to the educational program of the students with intensive support needs.

    Discussion: Has Sue broken any rules about confidentiality? If so, which ones? How? What could she have done differently?

    challenging situations outside agency support
    Challenging Situations: Outside Agency Support

    Brian is an EA who supports students with intensive support needs in a Grade 3 Classroom. He has been an EA in the school for about 5 years and is widely known and respected by other EAs as well as many teachers.

    Brian walks into the staffroom and sits down with many of the EAs and classroom teachers. As he tunes into the discussion, he notices that the topic of conversation has to do with the student he supports. He hears several comments made about the student’s family. As Brian becomes increasingly uncomfortable, one of the teachers turns to him and asks, “Brian is that true about Mrs. Smith?”

    Discussion: How should Brian respond? What is Brian’s responsibility in the specific situation? What is Brian’s responsibility with his team afterward?

    challenging situations community helpers
    Challenging Situations: Community Helpers

    Delores is an EA who supports several students with (at times) challenging behaviour in the middle years. She has been an EA for many years. Delores is widely known in her community for her volunteer work at the local ice rink.

    One of the students who Delores supports at school goes to the rink to play hockey regularly. One evening, Delores notices that the student is beginning to have some difficulty managing some of his behaviours. Delores has learned several behavioural management techniques to support this student in school.

    Discussion: What should Delores do? Should she intervene at the ice rink with the behavioural management techniques that she learned at school? If so, when another volunteer asks what she did and why, should Delores describe the behavioural management strategy? If another volunteer asks her what works especially well with the student, should Delores respond?

    safety with transfers lifting
    Safety with Transfers & Lifting
    • Click here to watch a video on back safety when working with young children.
    • Click here for manual handling basics.
    • When lifting, remember the BACK:
          • Back Straight & Bend at the knees
          • Avoid Twisting
          • Close to Body
          • Keep it smooth
      • Please note that if you are required to transfer or lift a student, a Transfer and Positioning Care Plan (TPCP) specific to the child will be provided. In the GSSD, we do not lift any child over 50 lbs. The TPCP is a document that describes the safest and most efficient methods for transferring and positioning a child with special needs.
    • To maintain your and student’s safety, print the following handouts on back care and safe practices for your future reference.
          • Back Care for families and caregivers of children
          • Working at Low Levels
          • Walking with students
          • Chest Harness Safety
          • Wheelchair to car transfer
    manual handling basics please click on the picture to start the video
    Manual Handling Basics: Please click on the picture to start the video

    If you would like further information on transferring and lifting students in your care, please speak to your school SST.

    what are universal precautions
    What are universal precautions?
    • Universal precautions are activities designed to reduce the risk of transmission of microorganisms from both recognized and unrecognized sources of infections.
    • Universal precautions apply to:
        • Blood
        • All body fluids, secretions and excretions, except sweat, regardless of whether they contain visible blood.
        • Non-intact skin
        • Mucous membranes.
    to prevent exposure to blood and body fluids wash your hands
    To prevent exposure to blood and body fluids: Wash your hands!

    Hand washing is the most effective procedure to protect staff from and other students from the transmission of infectious diseases.

    For a review of how to hand wash correctly please click on the picture below.

    to prevent exposure to blood and body fluids
    To prevent exposure to blood and body fluids:

    Anticipate situations that would place an individual in contact with infectious materials.

    Hand washing is the most effective procedure to protect staff from and other students from the transmission of infectious diseases.

    Personal protective equipment provides additional protection.

    when should you wash your hands
    When should you wash your hands?

    Before and after contact with students;

    After touching or cleaning inanimate objects contaminated with secretions, blood or other potentially infectious material EVEN IF GLOVES WERE WORN;

    After contamination of the hands by secretions, blood or other potentially infectious materials EVEN IF GLOVES WERE WORN.

    After removal of gloves or other personal protective equipment; and

    Before taking breaks and at the end of the workday.

    personal protective equipment
    Personal protective equipment
    • Intended to reduce the risk of contact with blood and other potentially infectious materials for the caregiver and to control the spread of
    • Appropriate personal protective equipment must be used in a consistent manner to reduce the risk of exposure.
    • Personal Protective Equipment includes:
      • Gloves, masks, eyewear, cover gowns or lab coats.
    wearing gloves
    Wearing gloves

    Click on the video to see a demonstration of how to donne and remove gloves

    Put on clean gloves just before touching mucous membranes and non-intact skin.

    Change gloves between tasks.

    Change gloves between procedures on the same student after contact with material that may contain a high concentration of micro-organisms

    Change gloves if they are torn or defective.

    Remove gloves promptly after use.

    Remove gloves promptly before touching non-contaminated items, other surfaces, or other students.

    Discard gloves after each use and DO NOT REUSE THEM.

    examples of situations to wear gloves
    Examples of situations to wear gloves

    Having contact with blood, other potentially infectious material, mucous membranes and non-intact skin.

    Changing diapers or assisting the student with cleansing after toileting or catheterization.

    Changing dressing/bandages or sanitary napkins.

    Providing mouth, nose, or tracheotomy care.

    When the student has broken skin on the hands or around the fingernails.

    Cleaning up of spills or secretions, blood or other potentially infectious material.

    Touching or cleaning items contaminated with secretions, blood or other potentially infectious materials.

    student specific training
    Student Specific Training
    • Is always required even if personnel have provided similar care to another student.
    • People who are directly responsible for planning and providing services for the student (CT, SST, School Principal) will arrange comprehensive training to meet the individual needs of the student.
    • Such training will provide:
        • An overview
        • Discussion of the procedure(s)
        • Emergency Plan
    optimizing student behaviour through positive behavioural support
    Optimizing Student Behaviour through Positive Behavioural Support
    • In the video, they referenced Positive Behavioural Supports (PBS). PBS involves the application of behaviour analysis to achieve socially important behaviour change.
    • PBS occurs:
      • at the prevention level for all students in a school;
      • at the strategic intervention level for students who are not responding, from a social-emotional and behavioural perspective, to the prevention level; and
      • at the intensive service or crisis-management level for students who need multi-faceted and/or comprehensive behavioural or mental health services.

    (ADE-SEU Rules and Regulations, Section 2.00, 2008)

    rationale for pbs
    Rationale for PBS

    Challenging behaviour is the single most common reason why students are removed from regular classrooms. Even though students with extreme behavioural challenges represent only 20% of school enrolment, they can account for more than 50% of behavioural incidents.

    Cohn, 2001

    rationale for pbs1
    Rationale for PBS
    • Harsh punishment and zero tolerance policies have not been effective at either improving behavioural climate in schools, or preventing students with problem behaviours from entering the justice system.
    • Three years after being excluded from school, almost 70% of these youth have been arrested.

    Cohn, 2001

    what does pbs do
    What does PBS do?

    PBS aims to replace challenging behaviours with prosocial behaviours.

    PBS does this by helping parents and school staff create and maintain a safe, supportive learning environment, promote positive life skills and reduce negative behaviours so that all children can succeed in school.

    PBS addresses both individual behaviour and environmental factors. It focuses more on building skills rather than punishing the student.

    PBS may address issues such as social skills training, resilience building, and discipline. It focuses on creating and sustaining school-wide, classroom, and individual supports that make the challenging behaviour less rewarding and exhibiting the desired behaviour more functionally effective for the student.

    positive behavioural supports pbs
    Positive Behavioural Supports (PBS)

    As a TEAM, take a moment to discuss some of the positive behavioural supports presently in place at the school level, in the classroom as whole, and if appropriate, for some of the students you will both be working with.

    t ea m orientation t ogether e veryone a chieves m ore2
    T & EA M Orientation“Together Everyone Achieves More”
    • Post-Test
      • To complete the Post-Test – You have two options:
        • If you have internet access, please click here and you will automatically connected to the test.
        • If you are not connected to the internet, please complete the post-test in your orientation binder. Following completion of the package, please ensure that all paperwork is forwarded to your school’s Student Services Coordinator.
    student services goals 2009 2011
    Student Services Goals2009-2011

    SUPPORT OF EAs:

    SMART GOAL:

    • By 2011, 95% of newly hired Educational Assistants will complete the GSSD digital self-guided orientation program.
    t ea m orientation t ogether e veryone a chieves m ore3
    T & EA M Orientation“Together Everyone Achieves More”
    • Congratulations! You have successfully completed Module 1 of our TEAM Orientation Package.
      • Please ensure that you have completed the following:
        • The Pre-Test – Online or Paper
        • Lessons 1-8
        • Workbook 1 – Answered question about inclusive schools.
      • We hope that you have enjoyed the orientation thus far. Next week, you should return with your teacher partner to complete Module 2.
      • In the interim, if you have any questions or comments, please contact your school’s SST or SSC.
    t ea m orientation t ogether e veryone a chieves m ore4
    T & EA M Orientation“Together Everyone Achieves More”
    • Congratulations! You have successfully completed Module 2 of our TEAM Orientation Package.
      • Please ensure that you have completed the following:
        • Lessons 9-14 (Including viewing of the video)
        • Workbook Module 2 – Sections 1-4
      • We hope that you have enjoyed the orientation thus far. Next week, you should return with your teacher partner to complete Module 3.
      • In the interim, if you have any questions or comments, please contact your school’s SST or SSC.
    t ea m orientation t ogether e veryone a chieves m ore5
    T & EA M Orientation“Together Everyone Achieves More”
    • Congratulations! You have successfully completed the TEAM Orientation Package.
      • Please ensure that you have completed the following:
        • Lessons 15 – 20
        • Workbook Module 3 – Sections 1-4
        • TEAM Post-Test
        • Summary and Concluding Comments – Please ensure that you have both signed and dated the workbook.
      • We hope that you have found the orientation informative.
      • Thank you for your time and hard work. Again, please remember to sign your workbooks and give a copy of the workbook to your SSC at his/her next visit to your school.
      • On behalf of Student Services, we wish you all the best as you work as a TEAM to meet the needs of students at your school!
    t ea m orientation t ogether e veryone a chieves m ore6
    T & EA M Orientation“Together Everyone Achieves More”

    1

    Welcome to

    The GSSD

    2

    TEAM

    Pre-Test

    3

    General

    GSSD

    Information

    4

    Who & What

    Is Student

    Services?

    5

    Roles &

    Responsibilities

    Of Educational

    Assistants

    7

    TEAM

    Introductory

    Video

    8

    Ten “C’s” of

    Effective

    Teamwork

    9

    Collaboration:

    What is this?

    Who does what?

    10

    Personal

    Program

    Planning

    6

    Roles &

    Responsibilities

    Of Classroom

    Teachers & SSTs

    11

    Emergency

    Procedures

    12

    What is

    Independence?

    How can I

    Promote

    Independence?

    13

    Confidentiality,

    Ethics &

    Documentation

    14

    Avoiding

    common

    pitfall s

    15

    Dealing with

    Challenging

    Situations

    16

    Safe

    Practices

    I.e. Lifting &

    Transfers

    17

    Universal

    Precautions

    18

    Optimizing

    Behaviour

    19

    Valuable

    Lessons

    from the

    Students

    20

    TEAM

    Post-Test

    t ea m orientation t ogether e veryone a chieves m ore7
    T & EA M Orientation“Together Everyone Achieves More”

    1

    Welcome to

    The GSSD

    2

    TEAM

    Pre-Test

    3

    General

    GSSD

    Information

    4

    Who & What

    Is Student

    Services?

    5

    Roles &

    Responsibilities

    Of Educational

    Assistants

    7

    TEAM

    Introductory

    Video

    8

    Ten “C’s” of

    Effective

    Teamwork

    9

    Collaboration:

    What is this?

    Who does what?

    10

    Personal

    Program

    Planning

    6

    Roles &

    Responsibilities

    Of Classroom

    Teachers & SSTs

    11

    Emergency

    Procedures

    12

    What is

    Independence?

    How can I

    Promote

    Independence?

    13

    Confidentiality,

    Ethics &

    Documentation

    14

    Avoiding

    common

    pitfall s

    15

    Dealing with

    Challenging

    Situations

    16

    Safe

    Practices

    I.e. Lifting &

    Transfers

    17

    Universal

    Precautions

    18

    Optimizing

    Behaviour

    19

    Valuable

    Lessons

    from the

    Students

    20

    TEAM

    Post-Test