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Presentation to the Sustainable Water Resources Roundtable April 2006 John Gasper

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Presentation to the Sustainable Water Resources Roundtable April 2006 John Gasper Argonne National Laboratory (202-488-2420, [email protected]). Energy and Water are inextricably linked: Energy for water and water for energy. Energy production requires water Thermoelectric cooling

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Presentation Transcript
slide1
Presentation to the

Sustainable Water Resources Roundtable

April 2006

John Gasper

Argonne National Laboratory

(202-488-2420, [email protected])

energy and water are inextricably linked energy for water and water for energy
Energy and Water are inextricably linked:Energy for water and water for energy
  • Energy production requires water
  • Thermoelectric cooling
  • Hydropower
  • Extraction and mining
  • Fuel Production (H2, ethanol)
  • Emission controls
  • Water production and
  • distribution require energy
  • Pumping
  • Treatment
  • Transport
energy development is already being affected by water constraints
Energy development is already being affected by water constraints
  • Water rates in the Las Vegas Valley will go up . . . because of increased electricity costs -- Las Vegas SUN, 2002
  • Utility regulators put ecology ahead of electricity in rejecting a major power plant . . . . that would use 2,500 gallons per minute to cool its steam turbines
    • -- Arizona Daily Sun 2002
  • Georgia Power Loses Bid to Draw Water from Chattahoochee
    • -- Miami Herald, February 2002
  • EPA Orders Mass. Power Plant to Reduce Water Withdrawals
    • -- Providence Journal, RI, July 2002
  • Idaho Denies Water Rights Request for Power Plants
    • -- U.S. Water News Online, August 2002
  • Pennsylvania Nuclear Power Plant to Use Wastewater from Coal Mines
    • -- The Philadelphia Inquirer, July 2003
  • Utilities Warn of Power Crunch if Flows Are Cut
    • -- Greenwire, July 2003
  • Governor of South Dakota called summit to discuss drought on the Missouri River and the impacts on irrigation, drinking-water systems, and power plants
    • -- News Release, February 2005
future energy development will put new demands on water resources
Future energy development will put new demands on water resources
  • Many new technologies will be more water intensive
  • Hydrogen economy would require even more water:
  • Constraints will grow for energy development and power plant siting

Source: multiple sources, to appear in the DOE Report to Congress

future water supplies and treatment will be more energy intensive
Readily accessible fresh water supplies are limited and have been fully allocated in some areas

Pumping at deeper depths and longer conveyance distance require more energy

New technologies to access and/or treat non-traditional water resources will require more energy per gallon of water

Impaired water, produced water, brackish water, and sea water

Power requirements for

current and future water supply

Future

Today

5000

4000

kWh per acre foot of water

3000

Sea Water Desalination

Public Water Supply Systems

2000

Brackish Water Treatment

1000

Future water supplies and treatment will be more energy intensive

Source: EPRI, 2000; Water Desalination Task Force, 2003

new science and technology can help
New Science and Technology can help

Understand supplies and demands better

Information systems to integrate energy-water databases

Computational science, hydrology, meteorology, energy policy & economics

Make new supplies available

New materials and separation processes

Advanced desalination

Treatment of impaired and produced water

Use what we have more efficiently

Increase water-use efficiency of energy

Optimize water management for multi-uses

all types of r d will be needed to address energy water challenges
All types of R&D will be needed to address Energy~Water challenges
  • Fundamental science for new knowledge and discoveries
  • Technology development to apply new ideas to current and future problems
  • Prediction/forecasting to guide R&D investments and improve decision-making
  • Demonstration, testing/evaluation, and technology transfer to impact commercial markets
congressional actions have converged with the ewn concepts
Congressional actions have converged with the EWN concepts
  • Energy Policy Act gives DOE new Authorization for Water-related R&D
    • Sect. 979: Energy-Water Supply Technologies Program
      • Water and Energy Sustainability Program
        • Assessments (collaboration w/ USACE and others)
        • Tools development for long-term planning
        • Report to Congress
  • Domenici-Pombo Water Technology bills are pending
    • 2004 press conference, Senate and House introductions, but no hearings
    • 2005 introductions in House (H.R. 3182) and Senate (S. 1860)
    • Latest versions are scaled down significantly from 2004 version
fy05 appropriations are now supporting two energy water efforts
FY05 appropriations are now supporting two Energy-Water efforts
  • Report to Congress
    • Consider energy and water interdependencies, trends in energy and water supplies, threats and concerns to energy production
    • Due to Congress by February 2006
  • Energy-Water Roadmap for DOE
    • Assess emerging energy and water resource issues based on user and stakeholder needs
    • Develop energy and water science and technology priorities
    • Due to DOE by September 2006
report to congress at the crossroads water resource impacts on energy security
Report to CongressAt the Crossroads: Water Resource Impacts on Energy Security
  • Interdependencies
    • Energy Required by Water
    • Water Required by Energy
  • Water Shortages and Impacts on Energy
  • Opportunities to Secure Our Energy and Water Future
  • Addressing Critical Energy – Water Challenges
national energy water technology roadmap process
Gap Analysis / Evaluate

By Executive Committee

Technology approaches /

Innovation Workshop

Technology Provider Driven

Research Priorities /

Strategies & Capabilities

Assessment

Peer Review

Publish

National Energy-Water Technology Roadmap Process

Timeline

Water for Energy

8/05

Executive Committee

Meeting

Executive Committee consists of ~ 20 members from industry, government, and academic institutions to provide external direction and review of process.

9/05

Three Regional Needs Workshops :

Central – East – West

User and customer driven

Central – 11/05

East – 12/05

West – 1/06

3/06

5/06

6/06

8/06

9/30/06

regional workshops to characterize needs
Regional Workshops to Characterize Needs

Timeline

Data, analysis, technology, policy issues of concern related to energy supply, water supply, energy impacts on water resources

Near-, mid-, long-term needs

Needs identified by representatives from industry, government, academic, NGOs

Water for Energy

8/05

Executive Committee

Meeting

9/05

Three Regional Needs Workshops :

Central – East – West

User and customer driven

Central – 11/05

East – 12/05

West – 1/06

3/06

5/06

6/06

8/06

9/30/06

issues of concern identified fall into six topical areas
Issues of concern identified fall into six topical areas

Integrated resource planning

Extracted and produced water

Information management systems databases and modeling

Water tech., efficiency, alternative sources

Management of surface and ground waters

Cost basis for water

examples of needs common to topical areas
Examples of Needs Common to Topical Areas
  • Improved data on regional water availability and sustainability
  • Coordinated regional natural resources and systems planning
  • Improved materials, processes, and technologies to enhance water use efficiency and energy use efficiency
    • Basic research in chemical and biological processes to improve energy and water use efficiency
    • Applied research and more joint industry-government field demonstrations of emerging technologies
  • Science-based and natural resource-based regulations and policy
  • Improved economic evaluations of costs and benefits to reduce technology risks and accelerate implementation
characterization of gaps
Gap Analysis / Evaluate

By Executive Committee

Characterization of Gaps

Timeline

Water for Energy

8/05

Executive Committee

Meeting

9/05

Three Regional Needs Workshops :

Central – East – West

User and customer driven

Central – 11/05

East – 12/05

West – 1/06

Independent expert panel identifies gaps between needs and available information capabilities, technology

3/06

5/06

6/06

8/06

9/30/06

gaps analysis status
Gaps Analysis Status
  • Workshop Held
  • Draft gaps categories identified
    • Water supply, characterization, monitoring needs
    • Integrated regional resource planning and decision support tools
    • Water treatment
    • Renewable/unconventional energy technology
    • Biomass/biofuels
    • Thermoelectric power generation
  • Analysis under preparation
    • Includes specific near-, mid-, long-term goals
next steps
Gap Analysis / Evaluate

By Executive Committee

Technology approaches /

Innovation Workshop

Technology Provider Driven

Technology approaches /

Innovation Workshop

Technology Provider Driven

Research Priorities /

Strategies & Capabilities

Assessment

Peer Review

Publish

Next Steps

Timeline

Water for Energy

8/05

Executive Committee

Meeting

9/05

Three Regional Needs Workshops :

Central – East – West

User and customer driven

Central – 11/05

East – 12/05

West – 1/06

Technology experts from industry, academia and research sectors identify potential technology- based solutions to gaps

3/06

5/06

6/06

8/06

9/30/06

energy and water sustainability
Energy and Water Sustainability
  • Growing recognition of importance of energy-water relationship in assuring energy security
  • Science and technology can play an important role in meeting future energy and water needs
  • Ongoing planning efforts will provide a path forward for research, development and technology innovation
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