business etiquette n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Business etiquette PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Business etiquette

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 17

Business etiquette - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 89 Views
  • Uploaded on

Business etiquette. Presented By by the Office of Career Development .

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Business etiquette' - albina


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
business etiquette

Business etiquette

Presented By by the Office of Career Development

slide2

Getting the job is the first step. Being successful on the job is an important second step. Employment is generally at-will, meaning that you or the employer can terminate the employment at any time. Co-ops and Interns are subject to the same policies and procedures in their workplace as full time employees. Incompetence or lack of contribution can certainly cost you a job, but so can behavior! It’s important to know what is expected, acceptable and respected at the workplace.

Presented By by the Office of Career Development

dress
Dress

Before your first day, learn the company’s dress code. Do not question it or challenge it. Do NOT think that dress is age related, and that younger employees are at liberty to dress more casual and hip. The dress code and expectations of the company are across the board. Low cut blouses, shirts that reveal the midriff, t-shirts promoting alcoholic drinks, tight pants and short skirts are among the many things that under NO circumstances are acceptable. If the employer doesn’t terminate you, it will certainly cost you respect from fellow employees and will most likely hinder your opportunities for advancement in the company.

Presented By by the Office of Career Development

hours
Hours

Know the hours that you are expected to work and work them. Do not arrive late, leave early or take extended lunch breaks. Report your hours honestly, and be sure to give plenty of notice if you need to take off. If you are sick, call into the office before or right at the time that you are expected to report to work.

Presented By by the Office of Career Development

company equipment
Company Equipment

Nothing that you are using at the workplace “belongs” to you. Everything is company property and is subject to be collected or reviewed. Your computer, phone and other equipment should be used for work purposes only.

Presented By by the Office of Career Development

personal equipment
Personal Equipment

Some companies forbid the usage of cell phones or other personal devices at the workplace. Know your company’s policy. If they allow personal equipment, limit its use. Excessive text messaging, internet usage (social networking) and personal phone calls will quickly cost you a job. Remember, you are on company time. They expect you to be working, not socializing or playing.

Presented By by the Office of Career Development

e mail
E-mail

Know the company’s policy on usage of personal e-mail. Directly asking an employer about their policy will give them the impression that you are going to be more focused on your social life than work. So, read the company’s handbook to learn the policy. If personal e-mail is allowed, LIMIT the use. No company will allow individuals to excessively converse with others concerning non-work matters during business hours.

Presented By by the Office of Career Development

be awake and alert
Be Awake and Alert

It is difficult for students, who are typically up late, to adjust their schedules. However, it is imperative that you get plenty of rest each night. Yawning and droopy/glossy eyes at the workplace make a very bad impression. Falling asleep while at work can lead to termination.

Presented By by the Office of Career Development

body language
Body Language

Be aware of your body language always. Crossed arms and legs can give the appearance that you are not interested in working or speaking with others. Maintain eye contact as you are speaking with co-workers and customers. Offer a handshake and introduction to EVERYONE you meet.

Presented By by the Office of Career Development

listening
Listening

Do not interrupt co-workers or supervisors as they are speaking. Allowing people to complete their thoughts and sentences will give them the impression that you are a strong listener. And remember, listen with your ears AND eyes. Maintain eye contact with the one speaking.

Presented By by the Office of Career Development

talking
Talking

Avoid gossip or negative talk about the company or other employees. Although casual and harmless conversations will come up between employees (and help build camaraderie), avoid social talking for lengthy time periods.

Presented By by the Office of Career Development

meetings
Meetings

Take a notepad (not a single piece of paper or sticky note) and pen with you to ALL meetings – individual or group. Trying to take mental notes is not impressive or wise. Supervisors will expect you to take written note of what they are saying, asking or explaining.

Presented By by the Office of Career Development

office odors
Office Odors

Scents can cause headaches or stomach aches. Avoid wearing heavy perfume or cologne to work. Although it might not bother you, it could likely bother your co-workers. Also, be considerate of others when bringing food to the office. Others may be bothered by the smell of your lunch. It is always best, if possible, to close your door or go to a lounge area while eating any foods.

Presented By by the Office of Career Development

be respectful
Be Respectful

“Yes ma’am” and “no sir” are not out-of-date. Address your co-workers and supervisors with respect. If they ask you to relax your language, you should honor their request by answering “yes” and “no.” Casual language, such as “yea” and “nah,” will cost YOU respect.

Presented By by the Office of Career Development

written communication
Written Communication

Because of typical text and e-mail language, it is easy to mess this one up! Err on the safe side and keep all communication professional. Spell out words, use punctuation and capitalization and avoid “chat” talk. Proofread everything before hitting the send button keeping in mind the tone of the message. Ask yourself, “can my tone be misinterpreted?”

Presented By by the Office of Career Development

conflict or concerns
Conflict or Concerns

Each company will have a proper way to express concerns or report conflict. Know the company’s policy and handle in the appropriate manner. Give careful consideration to what you will say and how you will say it. Write down your thoughts in advance so that you don’t misstate something.

Please remember that if you do experience any type of problems, notify the Office of Career Development as soon as possible.

Presented By by the Office of Career Development