Assessing the prevalence of game based learning in vocational training in ireland
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Assessing the prevalence of Game-Based Learning in Vocational Training in Ireland. Mr. Brendan Kelleher, Dr. Patrick Felicia Waterford Institute of Technology. About me. Developer/researcher for the G ame- B ased L earning (GBL) research g roup at Waterford Institute of Technology

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Assessing the prevalence of game based learning in vocational training in ireland

Assessing the prevalence of Game-Based Learning in Vocational Training in Ireland

Mr. Brendan Kelleher,

Dr. Patrick Felicia

Waterford Institute of Technology


About me
About me Vocational Training in Ireland

  • Developer/researcher for the Game-Based Learning (GBL) research group at Waterford Institute of Technology

  • Design and develop websites, apps and educational games

  • Research Interests:

    • Game-based learning

    • Artificial intelligence


Activities of the game based learning research group
Activities of the Game-Based Learning research group Vocational Training in Ireland

  • Specialise in the design, deployment and evaluation of GBL solutions

  • Interested in furthering the understanding of how games can improve both motivation and learning outcomes

  • Organise GBL events:

    • Presentations from members

    • Workshops

    • National and international conferences


Overview
Overview Vocational Training in Ireland

  • Background of the study

  • Objectives of the project

  • Data collection & analysis

  • Challenges

  • Useful Links

  • Resources


Background of the study
Background of the study Vocational Training in Ireland

  • GBL is a highly motivating and stimulating medium (Bixler, 2005)

  • Learning seems to be conducted in a traditional way in Vocational Education Committees (VEC)s despite technology use becoming ever more widespread

  • There is little mention of GBL in teacher training and some teachers were never formally introduced to facilitate its use for their classes


Background of the study1
Background of the study Vocational Training in Ireland

  • Part of a European fundedproject examining the use of mobile devices and GBL for vocational education

  • Mobile Games Based Learning Vocational Education & Training (MoGaBaVET) research project

  • The study is focused on assessing and finding the best methods for creating, analysing and deploying game-based learning for vocational education


Background of the study2
Background of the study Vocational Training in Ireland

  • It also examines the possibility of utilising mobile devices

  • The partners includes five organisation:

    • Humance AG, Germany

    • Bildungszentren des Baugewerbes (BZB), Germany

    • Waterford Institute of Technology, Ireland

    • Fundación Laboral de la Construcción, Spain

    • Stiftung ECAP, Switzerland


Background of the study3
Background of the study Vocational Training in Ireland

  • How game-based learning can help teachers:

  • “to understand the role of a teacher as a facilitator of instruction” (Sardone& Devlin-Scherer, 2009)

  • Can encourage different forms of learning. Eg. gesture based learning, augmented reality etc…

  • Allows the learner to take ownership of learning


Background of the study4
Background of the study Vocational Training in Ireland

  • How game-based learning can help learners..

  • Reduce any inhibitions toward learning

    - “Players learn through their games to handle cultural relativity and to deal with different people and roles”. (Prensky, 2002)

  • Identify their weaknesses through gameplay in a safe environment

    - “Educational gaming encourages active learning and risk taking in an environment where real-world consequences are diminished “. (Gee, 2007)


Background of the study5
Background of the study Vocational Training in Ireland

How game-based learning can help learners:

  • Allows learners to reflect on their experiences

  • Encourages the learner to be involved in the learning process (sense of control and ownership of learning)

  • Improves skills through repetitive play

    - “Players of computer and video games not only learn how to do things in terms of knowing the procedures, but they also practice the skills until the learning is internalized and becomes second nature”. (Prensky, 2002)


Objectives of the project
Objectives of the project Vocational Training in Ireland

  • To examine the use (or lack of use) of Information & Communications Technology (ICT) and games by teachers in Vocational Education

  • To identify teachers’ perception of GBL as well as their attitudes and expectations regarding the use of GBL in a classroom environment

  • To guide the design and development of a GBL solution for vocational education


Data c ollection methodology
Data Vocational Training in Irelandcollection: Methodology

  • Contacted 33 Vocational Education Committees (VEC)s around Ireland

    • Made the online survey available to the teachers in the VECs

    • Followed up initial email with reminders

    • Phone interviews with teachers from three Youthreach centres

  • Data collection in May 2013

    • Planning to extend until September/October


Data collection target groups
Data collection: Vocational Training in Ireland Target groups


Data c ollection structure of the survey
Data c Vocational Training in Irelandollection: Structure of the survey

  • Seven sections examining:


Data collection objectives of the survey
Data collection: Vocational Training in IrelandObjectives of the survey

  • Examine ICT use

  • Assess any previous use of games for learning

  • Assess any previous use of mobile devices for learning

  • Identify teachers’ beliefs regarding the motivational and pedagogical benefits of using games for learning


About the respondents
About the respondents Vocational Training in Ireland


About the respondents1
About the respondents Vocational Training in Ireland


About the respondents2
About the respondents Vocational Training in Ireland


About the respondents3
About the respondents Vocational Training in Ireland


About the respondents4
About the respondents Vocational Training in Ireland


I nformation t echnology it proficiency
I Vocational Training in Irelandnformation Technology(IT) proficiency


It proficiency
IT proficiency Vocational Training in Ireland


It proficiency1
IT proficiency Vocational Training in Ireland


It proficiency2
IT proficiency Vocational Training in Ireland


It proficiency3
IT proficiency Vocational Training in Ireland


I nformation c ommunication t echnology ict for teaching and learning
I Vocational Training in Irelandnformation & Communication Technology (ICT) for Teaching and Learning


Ict for teaching and learning
ICT for teaching and learning Vocational Training in Ireland


Ict for teaching and learning1
ICT for teaching and learning Vocational Training in Ireland


Ict for teaching and learning2
ICT for teaching and learning Vocational Training in Ireland


About those who have never used educational games for teaching
About those who have never Vocational Training in Irelandused educational games for teaching



About those who have used educational games for learning
About those who teachinghave used educational games for learning





Mobile games for learning
Mobile teachinggames for learning


Mobile games for learning1
Mobile teachinggames for learning


Mobile games for learning2
Mobile teachinggames for learning


Mobile games for learning3
Mobile teachinggames for learning


Motivational and pedagogical support
Motivational and teachingpedagogicalsupport


Motivational and pedagogical s upport
Motivational and teachingpedagogicalsupport


Motivational and p edagogical s upport
Motivational and p teachingedagogicalsupport


Motivational and p edagogical s upport1
Motivational and p teachingedagogicalsupport


Motivational and p edagogical s upport2
Motivational and p teachingedagogicalsupport


Motivational and p edagogical s upport3
Motivational and p teachingedagogicalsupport


Motivational and pedagogical support1
Motivational and teachingpedagogical support


Challenges
Challenges teaching

  • No time to consider using games

  • Afraid to try something new…

    • …go with what is safe and familiar

  • Overly complicated rules…

    • …difficult to see any clear pedagogical benefit



Challenges1
Challenges teaching

  • Continual Professional Development (CPD) does not explore the use of games as a learning strategy

  • Learning should be learner-centred

  • Move away from rigidly defined courses

    • Use games as an additional resource


Challenges2
Challenges teaching

  • Technology is to a large degree under utilized for education.

    • Lack of direct funding

    • Inconsistent use

  • Lack of a clear guideline to adopt GBL for vocational education

  • Need for an integrated approach to provision of VET in Ireland


Food for thought
Food for thought… teaching

Teachers need time to test and trial GBL!

Resources must be centralised!

Teachers need access to resources, anywhere, anytime!


Useful links
Useful Links teaching

  • Links worth checking out:

    • http://etuitionnetwork.ning.com/

    • http://www.fit.ie/

    • http://www.engagelearning.eu/teachers


Thanks for listening
Thanks for teachingListening

  • Email: bkelleher@wit.ie or pfelicia@wit.ie

  • www.gbl-research.com

  • @gblresearch or @brendecimus


References
References teaching

  • Bixler, B. (2005). Motivation and its relationship to the design of educational games. Paper presented at the New Media Consortium (NMC) Online Conference on Educational Gaming, Internet.

  • Gee, J. P. (2007). What video games have to teach us about learning and literacy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

  • Prensky, M. (2002) What Kids Learn That’s POSITIVE from Playing Video Games.

  • Sardone, N. B., & Devlin-Scherer, R. (2009). Teacher Candidates' Views of Digital Games as Learning Devices. Issues In Teacher Education, 18(2), 47-67.

    • Spotlight on VET, Ireland. http://www.cedefop.europa.eu