Why is it important to read? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Why is it important to read?

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  1. Do Now (5 min) Why is it important to read?

  2. Introducing Independent Reading Activity1.6 

  3. Agenda • Do Now (5 min) • Objectives (2 min) • The Double Entry Journal Method (3 min) • Book Descriptions (15 min) • Reading Timelines (5 min) • Checking Out Books (10 min) • Reading Time (15 min) • Closing (1 min) • Exit Slip (0 min) • Participation Grades (3 min)

  4. Content (The knowledge you’ll master today) • SWBAT: • Create rough draft classroom norms for 10 different situations • Create class-wide final-draft classroom norms for 10 different situations • Define the word “norm” and explain why it is important to have norms Objectives (2 min) • Content (The knowledge you’ll master today) • SWBAT: • Actively read Language (How you will master the knowledge) By: • Writing notes in a double entry journal

  5. The Double Entry Journal Method (3 min) • Objective: SWBAT:Actively ready by writing notes in a double entry journal

  6. Book Descriptions (15 min) "Speak up for yourself - we want to know what you have to say." From the first moment of her freshman year at Merryweather High, Melinda knows that this is a big fat lie, part of the nonsense of high school. She is friendless, outcast, because she busted an end-of-summer party by calling the cops, so now nobody will talk to her, let alone listen to her. As time passes, she becomes increasingly isolated and practically stops talking altogether. Only her art class offers any solace, and it is through her work on an art project that she is finally able to face what really happened at that terrible party: she was raped by an upperclassman, a guy who still attends Merryweather and is still a threat to her. Her healing process has just begun when she has another violent encounter with him. But this time Melinda fights back, refuses to be silent, and thereby achieves a measure of vindication. In this powerful novel, an utterly believeable heroine with a bitterly ironic voice delivers a blow to the hypocritical world of high school. She speaks for many a disenfranchised teenager while demonstrating the importance of speaking up for oneself. Speak

  7. Book Descriptions (15 min) The Hunger Games In the ruins of a place once known as North America lies the nation of Panem, a shining Capitol surrounded by twelve outlying districts. Long ago the districts waged war on the Capitol and were defeated. As part of the surrender terms, each district agreed to send one boy and one girl to appear in an annual televised event called, "The Hunger Games," a fight to the death on live TV. Sixteen-year-old KatnissEverdeen, who lives alone with her mother and younger sister, regards it as a death sentence when she is forced to represent her district in the Games. The terrain, rules, and level of audience participation may change but one thing is constant: kill or be killed.

  8. Book Descriptions (15 min) Catcher in the Rye The hero-narrator of The Catcher in the Rye is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caulfield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days. The boy himself is at once too simple and too complex for us to make any final comment about him or his story. Perhaps the safest thing we can say about Holden is that he was born in the world not just strongly attracted to beauty but, almost, hopelessly impaled on it. There are many voices in this novel: children's voices, adult voices, underground voices-but Holden's voice is the most eloquent of all. Transcending his own vernacular, yet remaining marvelously faithful to it, he issues a perfectly articulated cry of mixed pain and pleasure. However, like most lovers and clowns and poets of the higher orders, he keeps most of the pain to, and for, himself. The pleasure he gives away, or sets aside, with all his heart. It is there for the reader who can handle it to keep.

  9. Book Descriptions (15 min) The House on Mango Street Acclaimed by critics, beloved by readers of all ages, taught everywhere from inner-city grade schools to universities across the country, and translated all over the world, The House on Mango Street is the remarkable story of Esperanza Cordero. Told in a series of vignettes – sometimes heartbreaking, sometimes deeply joyous – it is the story of a young Latina girl growing up in Chicago, inventing for herself who and what she will become. Few other books in our time have touched so many readers.

  10. Book Descriptions (15 min) Monster "Monster" is what the prosecutor called 16-year-old Steve Harmon for his supposed role in the fatal shooting of a convenience-store owner. But was Steve really the lookout who gave the "all clear" to the murderer, or was he just in the wrong place at the wrong time? In this innovative novel by Walter Dean Myers, the reader becomes both juror and witness during the trial of Steve's life. To calm his nerves as he sits in the courtroom, aspiring filmmaker Steve chronicles the proceedings in movie script format. Interspersed throughout his screenplay are journal writings that provide insight into Steve's life before the murder and his feelings about being held in prison during the trial. "They take away your shoelaces and your belt so you can't kill yourself no matter how bad it is. I guess making you live is part of the punishment."

  11. Reading Timelines (5 min) Speak = 4 pages per night Hunger Games = 7 pages per night Catcher in the Rye = 4 pages per night The House on Mango Street = 3 pages per night Monster= 6 pages per night Your Independent Reading Book Ad-Campaign is DUE BY November 9th That means you should be done reading at least by November 5th That gives you 58 days to read your books

  12. Content (The knowledge you’ll master today) • SWBAT: • Create rough draft classroom norms for 10 different situations • Create class-wide final-draft classroom norms for 10 different situations • Define the word “norm” and explain why it is important to have norms Closing (1 min) • Did you master the following objectives? • Content (The knowledge you’ll master today) • SWBAT: • Actively read Language (How you will master the knowledge) By: • Writing notes in a double entry journal

  13. Exit Slip (3 min) What is the double-entry journal used for?

  14. SMART (Participation) Grade (5 min) Each day YOU will decide the grade you deserve.* Your 5-point daily participation grade is based on CLA’s core-values: CLA Students are S.M.A.R.T. S = Self-Controlled M = Motivated A = Accountable R = Respectful T = Timely What do you deserve today? *One point for each core-value (5 points possible each day). I reserve the right to change these grades.