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Word Study. Alicia Sims Colleen Kiley Katelyn Gorham Alana Amorese Kathryn Connolly Bethany Barone. By PresenterMedia.com. Agenda . 5:00-5:30pm. 5:30-6:30pm. 6:30-6:40pm. An idea of how tonight will go…. Introduction to Word Study. Stations (2 rotations).

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word study

Word Study

Alicia Sims

Colleen Kiley

Katelyn Gorham

AlanaAmorese

Kathryn Connolly

Bethany Barone

By PresenterMedia.com

agenda
Agenda

5:00-5:30pm

5:30-6:30pm

6:30-6:40pm

An idea of how tonight will go…

Introduction to Word Study

Stations (2 rotations)

Stations (last rotation)

Conclusion & Wrap-up

Break 

6:40-7:10pm

7:10-7:30pm

prior knowledge
Prior Knowledge:

Survey Says:

In order to prepare for this presentation, we sent out a brief survey, which consisted of seven questions. We felt these questions would provide us with a generalization of the knowledge of word study already held by our peers. The results of this survey are as follows:

Question 1

Question 2

Question 3

Question 4

Question 5

Question 6

Question 7

question 1
Question 1

Back to Questions

What is word study? There were 13 responses, 3 of which stated more than 1 answer.

question 2
Question 2

Back to Questions

On a scale of 1 to 5, rate your comfort level with teaching word study (1 being uncomfortable and 5 being very comfortable).

question 3
Question 3

Back to Questions

Have you ever heard of a spelling inventory?

question 4
Question 4

Back to Questions

What is Nifty Thrifty Fifty?

question 5
Question 5

Back to Questions

Why is word sorting beneficial?

question 6
Question 6

Back to Questions

When is word study instruction MOST beneficial?

question 7
Question 7

Back to Questions

Have you ever created a word wall?

so what exactly is word study
So, what exactly is Word Study?
  • Word study allows students to discover patterns, regularities, and conventions of the English language.
  • This allows an increase in specific knowledge of words, such as the spelling and meaning of individual words.
  • Purpose:
    • to examine words in order to reveal consistencies within our written language system
    • to help students master the recognition, spelling, and meaning of specific words

- Bear, Invernizzi, Templeton, & Johnston (2004)

youtube clips on word study
YouTube Clips on Word Study
  • Word Study in Action, Focusing on Spelling Patterns
  • Word Study in Action, Focusing on Literacy Centers
  • Word Study in Action, Focusing on Building Metacognition
  • Words Their Way authors on Student Benefits
  • Words Their Way authors on ELL Application
emergent stage

Back to Stages

Emergent Stage
  • Talk with students and read to students to enhance vocabulary
  • Build vocabulary with concept sorts
  • Develop phonological awareness with picture sorts, songs, and games
  • Enhance alphabet knowledge with sorts, games, writing, and matching activities
  • Sort pictures by initial consonant sounds to learn letter-sound correspondences

Emergent Spelling

Emergent Writing

Emergent Reading

Emergent Activities

what does spelling look like

Back to Emergent Stage

What Does Spelling Look Like?
  • Learn to recognize and write letters of the alphabet
  • Play with sounds in words and letters
  • Sound play focuses on beginning and rhyming sounds
  • Sort by rhyme and beginning sounds
  • By the end, acquire an understanding of the concept of words
  • Begin to match picture cards to the words that represent their names
what does reading look like

Back to Emergent Stage

What Does Reading Look Like?
  • Pretend reading
    • paraphrase or spontaneous retelling at the global level that children produce while turning pages of a familiar book
  • Memory Reading
    • Involves an accurate recitation of the text accompanied by pointing to the print in some fashion
    • Helps children coordinate language with print at the level of words, sounds, and letters
  • Acquire Directionality
    • Realizing they should move left to right, top to bottom and end up on the last word of the page
  • Concept of Word (COW)
    • Ability to finger point or track accurately to words in print while reading from memory
what does writing look like

Back to Emergent Stage

What Does Writing Look Like?

Early Emergent Writing

  • Discovering scribbling can represent something
  • Largely pretend
  • Scribbles can evolve into representational drawings
  • Learns print is distinct from drawing

Middle Emergent Writing

  • Top to bottom linear arrangement
  • Experiments with letter-like forms
  • As letters and numbers are formed, they show up in letter strings or “symbol salad”

Late Emergent Writing

  • Use letters to represent speech sounds in a systematic way
  • Represents 4 critical insights and skills:
  • 1. To produce a spelling, children must know some letters
  • 2. They must know how to form or write some of the letters
  • 3. They must know that letters represent sounds
  • 4. They must attend to the sounds or phonemes within spoken words and syllables and match those sound segments to letters
emergent activities

Back to Emergent Stage

Emergent Activities

Read-Alouds

PEER Retellings

Two for One!

using read alouds to develop vocabulary

Back to Activities

Using Read-Alouds to Develop Vocabulary
  • Teachers need to draw attention to words and plan ways to ensure that new words are acquired and used
peer retellings through dialogic reading
PEER-Retellings through Dialogic Reading
  • Children learn how to talk about and retell a storybook with the guidance and prompting of the teacher
  • Children are gradually given more responsibility for retelling the story until they can do so with little or no assistance
  • Procedure
    • Begin by reading a book aloud and then follow up with small-group or individual rereading before engaging in a prompted discussion
    • Should follow the PEER guidelines
    • P- Prompt the child to say something about the book using open-ended questions (point to a picture of a mouse and say “What is he doing” The child says “Running”)
    • E- Evaluate the child’s response (“That’s right”)
    • E- Expand the response by rephrasing or adding information to it (“The mouse is running away from the cat”)
    • R- Repeat the prompt and ask the child to expand on it (Tell me what the mouse is doing” The child says, “He is running away from the cat.”

Back to Activities

two for one long words short words
Two for One! Long Words, Short Words
  • Build compound words to help to create phonological awareness
  • Procedure:
    • Choose two syllable compound words from Appendix E (bedroom, blackbird, doorbell, eyeball, fireman, football) with corresponding pictures
    • Take a picture of snow and another picture of a man and discuss meaning of the words separately
    • Place the two pictures side by side and have the students say each word in succession (snow-man)
    • Replace the two pictures with a picture of a snowman and have the students discuss how it’s made of two words
    • Hold up a picture of snow and have students clap as they say “snow” then same with “man” and then clap the “snowman” picture
    • Discuss how the word “snowman” is longer than the single words “snow” and “man” because it has two claps

Back to Activities

letter name alphabetic stage

Back to Stages

Letter Name-Alphabetic Stage
  • Use picture sorts to review initial consonants
  • Sort pictures and words to contrast blends and diagraphs
  • Introduce short vowels in contrasting word families
  • Examine short vowels in CVC words
  • Develop sight words with word banks
  • Enhance oral vocabulary through read-alouds and concept sorts

LNA Spelling

LNA Writing

LNA Reading

LNA Activities

what does spelling look like1

Back to LNA Stage

What Does Spelling Look Like?

Operate in the first layer of English - the alphabetic layer

There’s an understanding that words can be segmented into sounds and that letters of the alphabet must be matched to these sounds in a systematic fashion

Beginning of Stage:

  • Students use most salient or prominent sounds and syllables, usually the beginning and ending consonants

Middle of Stage:

  • Students include a vowel in each stressed syllable and they spell short vowels by matching the way they articulate the letter names of the vowels 

End of Stage:

  • Students have learned how to spell many words with short vowels correctly
what does reading look like1

Back to LNA Stage

What Does Reading Look Like?

Students acquire a concept of a word - the ability to track or fingerpoint read a memorized text without getting off track on a two-syllable word

Students have rudimentary concept of a word and eventually have full concept of a word

Students are able to point and track to the words of a memorized text using their knowledge of consonants as clues to word boundaries

Students are thrown off track with two syllable words and when they are asked to find words in what they read they are slow and hesitant 

Students are able to acquire a few words from familiar stories and short dictations that they have reread several times  

Students’ sight vocabulary grows slowly and pictures are mixed with known words in sorting 

At the end of the stage students are able to identify words immediately when asked to find words in a text 

Disfluecny is very common with beginning reader

what does writing look like1

Back to LNA Stage

What Does Writing Look Like?

Students often write words slowly, sound by sound

Students in the name-alphabetic stage can usually read what they write, depending on how completely they spell, and their writing is generally readable to anyone who understands the logic of their letter-name alphabetic strategy

lna activities

Back to LNA Stage

LNA Activities

Rhymes & Pattern Stories

Sound Boards

Roll the Dice

rhymes and pattern stories
Rhymes and Pattern Stories

Back to Activities

This activity will help students in their development and use of personal readers and Word Banks. This activity provides support for beginning readers and can then be used to harvest known words for Word Banks.

Procedure:

  • Teacher will find a rhyme, jingle, or predictable story that students find memorable and read-able
  • Teacher will introduce text and read aloud to the students using fingerpointing
  • The students choral read along with the teacher
  • The teacher will decide which parts of the text will be compiled for personal readers
  • Each student has a copy of the text that is being read
  • In the preceding days the teacher rereads the rhyme or story and harvests words for a Word Bank
  • Sentences from the text can be written on sentence strips and the students can work to rebuild the text in a pocket chart
sound boards
Sound Boards

Back to Activities

Sound Boards will help students review the beginning sounds including digraphs and blends. Sound boards are references for letter-sound features( beginning consonants, digraphs, and blends). Sound boards provide a key word and picture for each letter-sound match, helping students internalize the associations

Procedure:

  • Sound boards are placed in students writing folders or personal readers making it easy for students to find letters to stand for the sounds they want to use
  • Teacher often posts charts of various letter-sound features. Display the chart in a prominent place for reference
  • A sound board may be left in a students word study folder to serve as a record of progress - Students can color the letters they have studied
  • Use sound boards to generate more words to add to a word family
  • The rime of the family is written on a small card and slid down beside the beginning sounds
roll the dice
Roll the Dice

Back to Activities

This activity can be used to enforce the study of word families. This game is for two to four players. Teacher will need a cube on which to write four contrasting word families ( an, ap, ag, at). A blank side is labeled ) “Lose a Turn” and another is labeled “Roll Again” . You will also need a blackboard or paper for recording words

Procedure:

  • Students roll the die
  • If it lands on a word family, the student must come up with a word for that family and record it on the chalkboard or paper
  • Students keep their own lists and can use a word only once, although someone else may have used it
  • If a player is stumped or lands on “Lose a Turn”, the die is passed to the next person
  • If the student lands on “Roll Again”, he or she takes another turn
  • The person who records the most words at the end of the allotted time wins
within word pattern stage

Back to Stages

Within Word Pattern Stage
  • Sort pictures to contrast short and long vowel sounds
  • Use words to study long vowel patters as well as ambiguous vowels and r-controlled vowels
  • Study complex consonants and homophones
  • Develop weekly routines and word study notebooks
  • Enhance vocabulary through homophones and inflectional morphology

WWP Spelling

WWP Writing

WWP Reading

WWP Activities

what does spelling look like2

Back to WWP Stage

What Does Spelling Look Like?

Spell most single syllable short vowel words correctly

Move away from sound by sound approach of the letter name and begin to include patterns or chunks of letter sequences that relate to sound and meaning

Begin to sort words by long vowel patterns

what does reading look like2

Back to WWP Stage

What Does Reading Look Like?

Students move from full alphabetic phase to the consolidated alphabetic phase in which they being to recognize patterns and chunks to analyze unfamiliar words

  • (ch-e-s-t) vs. (ch-est)
  • Enables students to read in phrases and with greater expression

Approach oral reading rates of 100 words per minute

Can manage substantial periods of silent reading

Students should read at least 30 minutes each day in instructional and independent level materials

what does writing look like2

Back to WWP Stage

What Does Writing Look Like?

Physical act of writing is performed with greater speed and less conscious attention

Added fluency gives writers more time to focus on their ideas which will account for a greater sophistication in the writing itself

wwsp activities

Back to WWP Stage

WWSP Activities

Vowel Spin

Homophone Win, Lose, or Draw

Semantic Sorts

vowel spin activity

Back to Activities

Vowel Spin Activity

Players spin for a feature (vowel sounds or vowel patterns) and remove pictures or words from their games boards that match the feature

Materials

  • 30 or more cards or picture cards that correspond to the feature students have been studying
  • Spinner divided into 3-6 sections labeled with vowel sounds or patterns to be practiced

Procedure

  • Players draw 9 cards from the deck and arrange in a 3 by 3 array
  • Player spins and removes the picture or word cards that fit the sound or pattern indicated by the spin.
  • The cards go into that players point pile
  • Re-draw to replace those cards in the array
  • Play continues until player is out of cards or there are no more to be drawn.
  • Player with the most cards in their point pile wins
homophone win lose or draw

Back to Activities

Homophone Win, Lose, or Draw

Four or more students work in teams to draw and guess each other’s words in a game that resembles charades (list can be found in Appendix E)

Procedure

  • Write homophone pairs on cards and shuffle
  • Students divide into 2 equal teams
  • One player is selected as the artist for that round
  • They must draw a picture representing a given homophone, which requires understanding a homophone’s spelling and meaning
  • A card is pulled from the deck and shown to the artists for both teams
  • As the artist draws, teammates call out answers
  • When the correct word is offered the artist calls on that team to spell both words in the pair
  • Point awarded to the team with the correct information first
semantic sorts

Back to Activities

Semantic Sorts

Students work with content related words to compare and contrast

Procedure

  • Make a list of key terms from a given unit in a textbook and make word cards for those terms
  • Sort the words in an open sort, establishing their own categories
  • Start with easy and familiar topics
  • Sorts are copied into a word study notebook for that content area
syllables and affixes stage

Back to Stages

Syllables and Affixes Stage
  • Use word sorts to study inflected endings and compound words
  • Examine syllable juncture with open and closed syllable sorts
  • Review vowel patterns in accented syllables
  • Sort words by final unaccented syllables
  • Study common prefixes and suffixes and how affixes change meaning and grammatical use
  • Enhance academic vocabulary in content areas

S&A Spelling

S&A Writing

S&A Reading

S&A Activities

what does spelling look like3

Back to S&A Stage

What Does Spelling Look Like?

Lingering confusions with ambiguous vowel patterns

For the most part students know how to spell single syllable words correctly

Focus shifts to two-syllable words and the conventions that govern spelling where syllables meet known as syllable juncture

Student often relies on sound rather than knowledge of the spelling meaning connection of the base word

Structural analysis, or examining important word elements is a powerful tool for spelling

Students use larger chunks of words

what does reading look like3

Back to S&A Stage

What Does Reading Look Like?

This stage is seen with intermediate readers

In this stage time is spent expanding reading interests and fine-tuning reading strategies

Background knowledge and vocabulary become critical elements in comprehension

Examining how important word elements (prefixes, suffixes, and base words) combine is a powerful tool for vocabulary development, spelling and figuring out unfamiliar words during reading:

  • If there is a prefix, take it off first
  • If there is a suffix, take it off second
  • Look at the base to see if you know it or if you can think of a related word
  • Reassemble the word, thinking about the meaning contributed by the base, the suffix, and then the prefix  

Students often use dictionaries to offer opportunities for determining the precise meaning of word students need to know in their reading as well as for understanding a word deeply

what does writing look like3

Back to S&A Stage

What Does Writing Look Like?

Increasingly confident and fluent in their writing, able to work for a longer period of time

Ability to spell majority of words allows them to focus attention on meaning they are trying to convey

More likely to hear a “voice” in their writing

More aware of their “audience”

Intermediate writers can be expected to revise for accuracy of spelling and punctuation

s a activities

Back to S&A Stage

S&A Activities

Freddy the Frog

Slap Jack

Pair Them Up

freddy the hopping diving jumping frog

Back to Activities

Freddy the Hopping, Diving, Jumping Frog

In this board game for 2-4 players, students review generalizations for adding –ing.

Create a game board by arranging Green circles in a path to represent lily pads

On each space write either “Double”, “E Drop”, or “Nothing”

Prepare playing cards by writing a variety of words with an –ing ending, an equal number for each rule

Use words that students have been sorting and add more words from a different word list

Procedure

  • Place playing cards facedown and put playing pieces on the starting space
  • Each player draws a card, reads the card aloud, and moves to the closest space that matches
  • A player who draws a penalty or bonus card must follow the directions on the card
  • The winner is the first person to reach the home lily pad
slap jack

Back to Activities

Slap Jack

A 2 person card game that is used to contrast open- and closed-syllable words as represented by any of the syllable spelling patterns. The object of the game is for one player to win all 52 cards.

Materials: On 52 small cards, write the words that you want to contrasted. For example, 26 words would follow the open-syllable VCV pattern (pilot, human) and 26 would follow the closed-syllable VCCV pattern (funny, basket). Write the word on both ends of the cards so that neither player has to read the words upside down 

Procedure:

  • The cards are dealt one at a time until the deck is gone, players keep their cards facedown in a pile in front of them.
  • Each player turns a card face up in a common pile at the same time
  • When 2 words with either open syllables or close syllables are turned up together, the first player to slap the pile takes all the cards in the common pile and adds them at the bottom of his or her pile
  • Turning cards and slapping must be done with the same hand
  • A player who slaps the common pile when there are not two open-or closed- syllable words must give both cards to the other player
  • Play continues until one player has all the cards
  • If time runs out, the winner is the player with the most cards
pair them up

Back to Activities

Pair Them Up

In this version of Memory or Concentration, students match up unusual plurals

Materials: Create two sets of cards using word pairs such as the ones that follow: wife/wives, leaf/leaves, life/lives, wolf/wolves, knife/knives, man/men, woman/women, mouse/mice, goose/geese, tooth/teeth, child/children. Make one card each of fish, sheep, and deer.

Procedure:

  • Shuffle the cards and lay them all out facedown in a 5 x 5 array
  • Each player turns over two cards at a time
  • If the cards make a match, the player keeps them and turns over two more
  • If fish, sheep, or deer are turned over, there is no match and the player automatically gets to keep the card and go again
derivational relations stage

Back to Stages

Derivational Relations Stage
  • Examine the spelling-meaning connection through the study of words derived from shared roots and bases
  • Sort words by Greek and Latin roots
  • Study assimilated or absorbed prefixes
  • Study suffixes and how they signal pars of speech
  • Enhance vocabulary through the study of morphology
  • Explore etymology and the history of the English language

DR Spelling

DR Writing

DR Reading

DR Activities

what does spelling look like4

Back to DR Stage

What Does Spelling Look Like?

Fairly competent spellers

Errors made are considered “high-level”, which require a more advanced foundation of spelling and vocabulary

Developing a deeper understanding and appreciation of how words work through spelling

Less urgency to move students along through this stage because they will be in this stage for a long period of time

Study of spelling-meaning connections is of paramount importance in boosting students’ vocabulary

what does reading look like4

Back to DR Stage

What Does Reading Look Like?

Explore Greek and Latin word elements that are important morphemes out of which thousands of words are constructed

Generative Process:

  • 60-80% of English vocabulary is generated through the combination roots, prefixes, and suffixes
  • Students who understand this process can analyze unfamiliar content-specific vocabulary they will encounter in their reading

Intermediate readers will pick up syllabic chunks while reading

  • Ex: morphology = mor-pho-lo-gy

Advanced readers will pick up morphemic chunks while reading

  • Ex: morphology = morph-olgy
what does writing look like4

Back to DR Stage

What Does Writing Look Like?

Proficient writers have potential to exercise the forms and functions of different genres

  • This knowledge helps to inform their voice or stance in their writing
  • Guides their word choice when they write or revise
dr activities

Back to DR Stage

DR Activities

You Teach the Word

Words That Grow

Root Webs

you teach the word

Back to Activities

You Teach the Word

Teachers assign students a word

The student is required to teach this word to the class

  • Students create a small poster including:
    • Definition
    • Synonym or Antonym
    • Etymology
    • Sentence
    • Illustration

Encourage students to think of creative ways to help their peers remember the word

words that grow

Back to Activities

Words That Grow

Whole-group or small-group activity in which students directly see how words grow

Procedure:

  • Decide on a base word or word group (“spec”) and write it at bottom of tree
  • Write different forms on individual branches
root webs

Back to Activities

Root Webs

A graphic way to represent the links between words derived from a common root

Procedure:

  • Choose a set of common roots, such as “photo-”, “geo-”, “aqua-”, “astro-”
  • Teacher models how to make web
  • Students create web in a small group
  • Students use dictionaries to locate roots, verify meaning, find origin, search for related words
  • Eliminate words that don’t fit the meaning of root
  • Lead students to examine parts and meaning
so what are teachers saying
So, what are teachers saying?
  • What do you think of Words Their Way?
    • “I think Words Their Way is a good program. First it gives us a way to assess kids word knowledge that we did not have before our district implemented the this program. It helps me understand the stages of learning how words work and how kids learn them. The supplemental materials allow me to meet the diverse word study needs of my students. It is also organized in a way that I can easily use materials to move kids forward in their word knowledge. The program also provide periodic small assessments to ensure that the kids have mastered what they have been taught. I think the overall is strong and designed to be used well in the classroom. The most challenging part is managing several groups and prepping all the materials for each group. There are consumable text books available but our district does not by them.”
                  • - Polly Finnegan
                  • West Ridge Elementary, Grade 1