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Life to Eagle Scout Project Proposal and Related Procedures. OR My Contract with the Community and Scouting. STEP ONE PLAN, DEVELOP AND GIVE LEADERSHIP TO OTHERS IN A SERVICE PROJECT HELPFUL TO ANY RELIGIOUS INSTITUTION, SCHOOL OR YOUR COMMUNITY. Rules.

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Life to Eagle Scout Project Proposal and Related Procedures


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    1. Life to Eagle Scout Project Proposal and Related Procedures

    2. OR My Contract with the Community and Scouting

    3. STEP ONE PLAN, DEVELOP AND GIVE LEADERSHIP TO OTHERS IN A SERVICE PROJECT HELPFUL TO ANY RELIGIOUS INSTITUTION, SCHOOL OR YOUR COMMUNITY

    4. Rules • Milton District believes that a scout’s project is his thought and his love and we will Endeavour to make it an approvable project SO LONG AS CERTAIN CRITERIA ARE MET

    5. CRITRERIA

    6. 1) Must not create financial profit for a commercial entity or be of a commercial nature. Not solely for a business or individual’s gain Example • A Scout wants to build a gazebo with garden for a Nursing Home so the residents have a nice place to sit---That is OK but if the Nursing home plans to rent it out for weddings etc then it is not OK

    7. 2) Not a Routine Labor project Example Organization wants help and gives the scout the plans, the check and says make it happen The scout must be a part of the planning and the fund raising.

    8. 3) Not on Council property or part of a BSA Activity or Property Can not do Eagle Projects on the Scout Camps or Visitors Service Center. Remember this is a COMMUNITY SERVICE PROJECT So municipal parks are acceptable sites

    9. 4) Not for a direct gain for the Scout Unit Building a Scout Hut or improving a Scout hut is not acceptable. Building a nature trail at your sponsoring organization’s place that scouts as well as others may use is acceptable

    10. 4) Must not be a fund raiser in itself—must have a purpose for the fund raiser Example: Buying a defibrillator is not acceptable, but buying a defibrillator and then teaching CPR classes to certify people in its use is allowable—

    11. 5) It can not be an extension of an existing Eagle project Nor can two prospective Eagle Scout candidates work on the same project

    12. The Key Requirement The Scout must show LEADERSHIP Think of the project as a Troop Project and the Eagle Scout as the SPL of the Project Not the Patrol Leader of the Project

    13. The Proposal The Eagle Scout Candidate must write a proposal of his service project: The best way to determine if you have included enough information in the proposal write up is: Is this proposal complete enough that another Scout would be able to use it to do your project from beginning to end exactly or better than you would do it without your being present!

    14. Use the Eagle Scout Workbook • This workbook and a guide to the workbook is found on the Milton District Web Site: www.miltonbsa.org Under programs heading—then under Advancement then under Eagle’s Nest There are many forms of the Eagle Scout Booklet—USE ONLY THE ONE ON THE MILTON WEB SITE!!

    15. A BIG FIRST • Before you let a scout start the Eagle Scout project write-up have him attend the Life to Eagle Seminar • Same time and night as Eagle Board of Reviews

    16. THE WRITE UP

    17. GENERAL ISSUES • Number all pages including attachments • Put a header or footer on every page stating Joe Scout Eagle Project • All attachments must be referenced to somewhere in the text. • All attachments have a title and label (attachment or appendix A or 1 etc) • Include a copy of your Life to Eagle Attendance certificate

    18. Cover page • Remember to write complete addresses including city state and zip code • Unit No.: Include unit with number— Troop 2000 not T2000 or 2000 • Unit advancement committee person’s name Address Telephone No.— This is the person all correspondence with Atlanta Council for Eagle Board of Reviews will occur

    19. Project Description • Describe the project you plan to do. • Key words here are brief description---don’t care about history or past • State WHATNOT HOW you will do with a brief explanation

    20. What group will benefit from the project? Benefitting Organization Telephone No Name of religious institution, school or community Street Address City State Zip code Basically who is your sponsor or Who are you Helping?

    21. My Project will be of benefit to the group because: • Why—BUT Briefly Don’t fill with Jibber Jabber!! • If necessary might want to include a brief description of organization if needs explaining • For example working at your church is obvious but saying working at the Drake house— Few might know what type of charity the Drake house is

    22. The project concept was discussed with the following representative of the group that will benefit from the project. This concept was discussed with my unit leader onDate Representative’s Name Date of Meeting Representative’s TitlePhone No. This is the person who is signing your project and will be agreeing that you completed your project. THIS MUST BE FILLED OUT BEFORE SUBMITTING TO DISTICT

    23. Project Details

    24. Present Condition • What is the present condition. Why is your project necessary PICTURES are worth a thousand words Use pictures when ever possible and reference to them

    25. Plans / Drawings / Designs This is architectural type drawings or schematics or diagrams. Not written step by step plans • Need to visualize what you want to accomplish and how (if building a bench include schematics and instructions---if taken from a book or internet source needs to be referenced properly • Each Drawing/Diagram should have a Title and Attachment Letter (B or 2 etc, “Bench Construction Diagram”, B3 etc.) and be referenced in this section • Include a diagram of what the finished product/project should look like if appropriate. Landscaping or benches this is possible, collections or blood drives this is not possible. • Any zoning or legal writings, specific specifications by community pertaining to your project

    26. Materials • Materials are used and can not be reused e.g. wood, nails, paint, stain concrete etc.

    27. Be specific what exactly are you buying. Each item should have the proper dimensions (Inches, feet; liquids- quart, gallons (shrubs) 5 gal or 10 gal, etc. • Screws or nails don’t say 1 say 1 box of #8 screws or on materials list Instead state #8 Screws ____ box(es) of 100 • Don’t say plants but specifically what plants (proper or common names) • Lumber specific wood size (2’x6’ etc) treated or untreated • Cement or Sand. Don’t say 5 bags instead state 5 20lb bags of Sand etc. • Paint or stain…Don’t say 2 cans; it is 2 one gallon cans etc.

    28. MaterialProvided ByNeededCostCost Sub total___________ (don’t forget tax) Provided by---where are these materials coming from. Home Depot, a specialty store. If you are donating an item put your or your family’s name and in parenthesis (donated) and the cost of the donated item…Another scout might not get that item donated. Don’t say donated by me.

    29. Supplies • The extras for example paper for diagramming, pencils, car wash soap, paper clips, rope, sandpaper, paper cups, trash bags, nylon strings or spray paint for marking areas, buckets etc. Can fall in here • If supplying bottled water instead of Cooler of water for drinking. • Include items needed as part of fund raising. • Lunch

    30. Provided ByNeededCostCost Sub total___________ (don’t forget tax) Same as Materials

    31. Tools • What tools to you need, include all, mops brooms, shovels, saws, paint brushes, files, sanders, etc. • Safety goggles, work gloves can go here or under supplies if you are supplying • First Aid kit • Cell Phone • Water Cooler for drinking

    32. Tool Provided By Total Needed Sub total_________ Total cost of project_______ (don’t forget tax) • Include cost of donated items because some one else might not be so lucky to get them donated… Don’t need to price donated or borrowed tools…assumed everyone can borrow tools except special power tools that will need to be rented like a jackhammer, chain saw, wood splitter, cement mixer etc— • Rented tools costs needs to be included here

    33. Step-by-step instructions Very specific so anybody can build it equal or better than you-- just by reading your project proposal.

    34. First Step • First step is usually fundraising You might briefly state your fundraising but refer to fundraising section where Financial Discussion belongs

    35. Second Step Procure materials, supplies and tools How and who

    36. Model Airplane Approach • When you build a model airplane are the instructions one sheet a paper with a bunch of steps OR • Is there some instructions with a diagram specific to those instructions and then some more instructions with a diagram specific to those instructions

    37. Lets Build a Cello Rack

    38. Which would be easier to follow

    39. This

    40. Assembly • Use diagrams 4 and 3. • Constructing the cello rack • Use the drawn instructions at the beginning of the step-by-step instructions for where to drill holes and put screws. • Gather materials. • Five 6”x 12” • Three 6”x 72” • One plywood 6”x 72” • Two 6”x 36” • Two small plywood sides • Place two (2) 6”x 72” parallel to each other • Place one (1) 6”x 12” in between on each side of the two boards. Mark and drill holes using the hand drill; screw boards in place one side at a time. Use the metal angle to keep the boards at right angles. This should create a rectangle. • Measure and mark the places for the three remaining 6”x 12” boards to be placed. They should be placed 15.5” apart. Mark, drill holes, and screw. • Hold in place two (2) 6”x 36” and mark and drill holes on one side of each board. Hold the ends of the two boards vertical to the ends of the base structure already built. Check to be sure it is level and screw together. • Hold in place the 6”x 72” and mark and drill holes on both ends. Hold behind and perpendicular to the two 6”x 36” boards, check to make sure that the boards are at right angles with a metal angle and screw into place. • Hold in place one (1) small plywood side and mark and drill holes. Be careful not to line holes up with any existing screws. Make sure the plywood side is flush with the rack and screw in place. • Repeat step G for the other side. • Hold in place the plywood 6”x 72” and mark and drill holes on the straight side. Make sure that the holes only line up with the 6”x 72” board. Hold the plywood in place and screw in place.

    41. OR THIS

    42. Cutting Wood • On the 48”x 96” ply wood measure and cut five (4) major sections using diagram 1 • 6”x 96” • 6”x 96” • 36”x 36” • 36”x 60” • Put one (1) 6”x 96” aside • On the other 6”x 96” measure 72” and cut. Put the 6”x 72” aside and discard the 6”x 24” • On the 36”x 36”, measure and cut it into two (2) 18”x 36” sections • Using diagram 4, measure 2” on the 18” side and 6” on the opposite 36” side. Using the chalk line, connect the two measurements making a 34” long diagonal line and cut. • Repeat step D on the other 18”x 36” • On the 36”x 60” using the chalk line divide it diagonally and cut. This should create two (2) 36”x 60”x 70” right triangles. • Using diagram 5 and measure the triangle into five sides. Look at diagram 1 for the positions of each measurement. From the right angle measure 30” and 54”. From the 54” mark measure 2” across using the metal 90-degree angle. From the 30” mark measure 6” across using the metal 90-degree angle. Using the chalk line, connect the 2” and the 6” mark. Once all measurements are checked with diagram 1 and 5, cut. • Repeat step G on the other triangle. • After all of these steps are completed there should be a 6”x 96” , 6”x 72” , two cello sides, and two bass sides.

    43. Using diagram 2 measure and cut the 2”x 6”x 8ft lumber. • Board 1: measure two (2) 36” sections and one (1) 24” section and cut. • Board 2: measure one (1) 72” section and cut. Save the 24” section. • Board 3: measure one (1) 72” section and cut. Save the 24” section. • Board 4: measure one (1) 72” section and cut. Save the 24” section. • Board 5: measure five (5) 12” sections and one (1) 24” section and cut. Discard extra board. • Board 6: measure one (1) 54” and cut. Discard extra board. • Board 7: measure one (1) 54” and cut. Discard extra board. • Boards 8, 9, 10: make no cuts.

    44. Using diagram 3, on one side of the 6”x 72” plywood, measure and cut. • From end point R measure 8.25” • Using the metal angle, measure down 3”, over 3”, and up 3”. This should create a 3”x 3” square. • From point R measure 25.75” • Using the metal angle, measure down 3”, over 3”, and up 3”. This should create a 3”x 3” square. • From point R measure 43.25” • Using the metal angle, measure down 3”, over 3”, and up 3”. This should create a 3”x 3” square. • From point R measure 60.75” • Using the metal angle, measure down 3”, over 3”, and up 3”. This should create a 3”x 3” square. • Cut all four (4) of the 3”x 3” squares out. • Using diagram 3, on one side of the 6”x 96” plywood, measure and cut. • From end point R measure 11.25” • Using the metal angle, measure down 3”, over 3”, and up 3”. This should create a 3”x 3” square. • From point R measure 34.75” • Using the metal angle, measure down 3”, over 3”, and up 3”. This should create a 3”x 3” square. • From point R measure 58.25” • Using the metal angle, measure down 3”, over 3”, and up 3”. This should create a 3”x 3” square. • From point R measure 81.75” • Using the metal angle, measure down 3”, over 3”, and up 3”. This should create a 3”x 3” square. • Cut all four (4) of the 3”x 3” squares out.

    45. Assembly • Use diagrams 4 and 3. • Constructing the cello rack • Use the drawn instructions at the beginning of the step-by-step instructions for where to drill holes and put screws. • Gather materials. • Five 6”x 12” • Three 6”x 72” • One plywood 6”x 72” • Two 6”x 36” • Two small plywood sides • Place two (2) 6”x 72” parallel to each other • Place one (1) 6”x 12” in between on each side of the two boards. Mark and drill holes using the hand drill; screw boards in place one side at a time. Use the metal angle to keep the boards at right angles. This should create a rectangle. • Measure and mark the places for the three remaining 6”x 12” boards to be placed. They should be placed 15.5” apart. Mark, drill holes, and screw. • Hold in place two (2) 6”x 36” and mark and drill holes on one side of each board. Hold the ends of the two boards vertical to the ends of the base structure already built. Check to be sure it is level and screw together. • Hold in place the 6”x 72” and mark and drill holes on both ends. Hold behind and perpendicular to the two 6”x 36” boards, check to make sure that the boards are at right angles with a metal angle and screw into place. • Hold in place one (1) small plywood side and mark and drill holes. Be careful not to line holes up with any existing screws. Make sure the plywood side is flush with the rack and screw in place. • Repeat step G for the other side. • Hold in place the plywood 6”x 72” and mark and drill holes on the straight side. Make sure that the holes only line up with the 6”x 72” board. Hold the plywood in place and screw in place.

    46. Thus the advantage of detailed instructions with diagrams

    47. Obvious pit falls • Include what it should look like when finished • Diagrams showing the location that objects will be located at when finished • Finishing---sanding, painting, sealing • Anchoring or securing or cementing • If power tools used make sure to CLEARLY state, who measures the item, who marks the item and who operates the power tool

    48. Don’t forget set up • Don’t forget orient crew leaders • Don’t Forget cleanup