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Scheduler New Contract Training Aug 2007
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  1. Scheduler New Contract TrainingAug 2007

  2. What we will Cover!! • Reserve Types – length of reserve period and counting it to total duty • Duty Day 0500z start 1900z stop. • Duty Times • What that means for trips between 0001z and 0700z • Transition days – scheduling conflicts • Layover days (they are a 1/7 break) and changing those days to reserve. The 3.65 hour guarantee. • How the 3.65 can trigger • Bid Line Guarantee, what it means and who gets it. • Removal from scheduled bid line. • Minimum Consecutive days off – What does the 5 day minimum mean? • Open time and the 83 hour bypass • Part 91 over 12 hours of block time • Minimum Rest Times – interruption of rest. • Suspension of duty • Ground deadhead pay

  3. R1 Reserve • R1 – “Hot” Standby at a company designated location. - Time of standby period is a crew scheduling decision - Immediate contact - Be able to depart from the assigned airport within 1hour of initial crew scheduling contact. - Length of assigned reserve period cannot exceed 12 hours. - If assigned a flight the duty period (I.E. 16 or 18 hours) must be calculated from the start of the reserve period. - Any pilot assigned R1 reserve receive a 3.65 hour ‘credit’ or what they fly if greater towards their monthly guarantee. Example – • A pilot starts R1 at 0500z and is assigned an international departure at 1200z. His 18 hour contract duty limit would end at 2300z. (R1 start 0500z + 18 hours = 2300z) • Contract reference - Section 17.O.1

  4. R2 Reserve R2 – Standby at a company designated location. - Time of standby period is a crew scheduling decision - Pilot must return call within 60 minutes of first contact - Must be able to report to the assigned airport within 2hour first contact - Length of assigned reserve period cannot exceed 12 hours. - If assigned a flight the duty period (I.E. 16 or 18 hours) must be calculated from the start of the reserve period. - Line holders assigned R2 reserve receive a 3.65 hour ‘credit’ or what they fly if greater towards their monthly guarantee. Reserve lineholders and bid line holders who had reserve days built into their bid line do not receive this credit. Contract section 5J Example – • A pilot starts R2 at 1000z and is assigned a domestic departure at 1300z. His 16 hour contract (and FAR) duty limit would end at 0200z. (R2 start 1000z + 16 hours = 0200z) • Contract reference - Section 17.O.2

  5. R2 Reserve Procedures • R2 Reserves – • Who makes the decision – • The lead scheduler (with assistance as needed by the crew planner) makes the R2 standby crew assignments. • The lead scheduler is responsible to complete (or delegate to another scheduler) the task of building crew pairings in Sabre that show the reserve on R2 status with the time of the assignment noted in the pairing. • The lead scheduler is also responsible to pull, at the start of their shift, all of the reserve reports from Sabre to serve as a paper back up. • Nothing precludes the lead scheduler from making changes to this plan for operational requirements. • For ALL R2 assignments at any location remember the following – • The start of the R2 duty time is also the start of the 16/18 hour duty limit. • You can call an R2 reserve at any time to release him from standby to get legal rest prior to a trip assignment or another reserve assignment. • Consecutive R2 assignments must have at least 10 hours off between the end of one R2 period and the start of the next. • Intent is to have these crews assigned no later than 2000z the day prior and/or no earlier than 11 hours after they arrive from a trip. • When an R2 crewmember is used another should be immediately moved into his R2 position (R4 to R2)

  6. R2 Reserve Procedures – Cont’d • EWR – Plan is for 2 crews to be assigned daily. • Times for assignment - • 1st crew – Unless instructed otherwise the first crew is to be assigned to start their R2 reserve duty 2 hours before the first departure. • 2nd crew – The second crew is to be assigned to start their R2 reserve duty 6 hours after the first crew started on reserve. • JFK – Plan is for at least 1 crew to be assigned daily. • Times for assignment – • 1st crew – Unless instructed otherwise the first crew is to be assigned to start their R2 reserve duty 2 hours before the first departure. • 2nd crew – If available they should be started no earlier then 6 hours after the 1st crew started on reserve. • LAX – Plan is for at least 1 crew to be assigned daily. • Times for assignment – • 1st crew – Unless instructed otherwise the first crew is to be assigned to start their R2 reserve duty 2 hours before the first departure. • ANC – Plan is for at least 1 crew to be assigned daily. • Times for assignment – • 1st crew – Unless instructed otherwise the first crew is to be assigned to start their R2 reserve duty 2 hours before the first departure. • Other Stations – • As operationally required -

  7. Example of R2 Reserve in Sabre

  8. Example of “Reserve out of Base Report”

  9. Reserve assigned to Trip

  10. R3 Reserve – “Trip Reserve” R3– Standby at a company designated location while on a trip. - 24 hour or less standby period. - Pilot must return call within 8 hours of first contact - Be able to depart from the assigned airport within 12 hour’s of initial crew scheduling contact. - Line holders assigned R3 reserve receive a 3.65 hour ‘credit’ or what they fly, if greater, towards their monthly guarantee. Reserve line holders do not receive this credit. Contract section 5J - Contract duty limits start at report time. Example – • A pilot starts R3 at 1200z and we leave a message for him at 1300z. He must return the call by 2100z and be able to depart on the new trip by 0100z. He can, of course, agree to depart earlier. • Contract reference - Section 17.O.3

  11. R3 Reserve Procedures • Cities that should have R3 trip reserves if available – • JFK or EWR – LGG, AMS, BAH, HKG, ICN and ANC • ‘Other Stations’ as operationally required. • Who makes the decision – • Initially the scheduling manager/crew planner and lead scheduler will meet at 11am daily with the OCC duty manager to determine the best location and start times for R3 reserves for the next 48 hours (72 on weekends) • The lead scheduler is responsible to have a list with them at the 11am meeting showing a detail of the crew’s scheduled to transit the R3 cities noted above for the forecast period. This can easily be obtained by using the a/p move up report in Sabre. • The lead scheduler is responsible to complete (or delegate to another scheduler) the task of building crew pairings in Sabre that show the reserve on R3 status with the time of the assignment noted in the pairing. • The lead scheduler is also responsible to pull at the start of their shift all of the reserve reports from Sabre to serve as a paper back up. • Unless operational requirements dictate otherwise, a crew with a layover of 32 hours of less should be released for their next trip and advised (if more then 24 hours) that they are on an FAR 1/7 break. • If no a/c is scheduled to transit the city where the crew is then an R3 assignment is not to be made unless instructed otherwise. • R3 assignments can be moved to R2 (or R1) assignments if needed however the 16/18 hour duty limits start when the R2 or R1 assignment starts. • Nothing precludes the lead scheduler from making changes to this plan for operational requirements.

  12. R3 Reserve Procedures Cont’d • Remember – for ALL R3 trip assignments. • The Capt is required to call scheduling after arvl to get his crews next assignment. At that time we are to advise him of assignment to R3 beginning at xxxx or released for 24 hours and to call back at xxxx. If we do release the crew for 24 hours then we also must tell them this is an FAR 1/7 break. • An R3 ‘trip reserve’ assignment can start no earlier then 8 hours after the crew blocks in. This 8 hours plus the 8 hour maximum call back will give the crew sufficient rest. • Before assigning a crew to ‘trip reserve” make sure they do not need 18 hours off for exceeding 20/48 and/or 24/72. • Consecutive R3 trip reserve assignments must have at least 8 hours off btwn the end of the 1st period and the start of the 2nd. • You can call an R3 reserve at any time to release him from standby to get legal rest prior to a trip assignment or another reserve assignment.

  13. R4 – Long Call Reserve R4– Reserve will be performed at the pilots residence. - 24 hour or less standby period. - Pilot must return call within 1 hour of first contact - Be able to depart from the assigned airport within 12hour of initial crew scheduling contact but will make ‘best efforts’ for earlier departure if requested by scheduling - Contract duty limits start at report time. Example – • A pilot starts R4 at 1200z and we leave a message for him at 1300z. He must return the call by 1400z and be able to depart on the new trip by 0100z. He can, of course, agree to depart earlier. • Contract reference - Section 17.O.4

  14. R4 Reserve Procedures • Who makes the decision – • The lead scheduler (with assistance as needed by the crew planner) makes the R4 standby crew assignments. • The lead scheduler is also responsible to pull, at the start of their shift, all of the reserve reports from Sabre to serve as a paper back up. • Will be assigned as R4 in Sabre. • Can be moved to R2 status as needed however the 16/18 hour duty limits start when the R2 or R1 assignment starts. • Nothing precludes the lead scheduler from making changes to this plan for operational requirements.

  15. Duty Day Start and Stop Times • Duty day still starts at 0001z. • However the pilot must report to the company designated location in the lower 48 states by 0500z. • Conversely on the pilots last scheduled work day he must be released, in the lower 48, by 1900z and returned to his residence airport by 2359z. • Any time in excess of 5 hours to/from a duty assignment is considered a commute. (The 5 hours is referred to as the ‘5 hour slide’) • If the pilot is not returned to a location in the lower 48 by 1900z AND is not able to commence travel to his residence airport by 2359z, he will be paid 3.65 hours (or actual hours flown if greater) for each day off worked. Note that both events have to happen to trigger the pay. • Nothing precludes the pilot from taking an earlier departure then 0700z (He might live in the departure city). • Trips departing before 0700z must be included in previous months pairings or have a DD (duty) day on the day prior if the pairing starts after the 1st. This is because the pilot does not have to report on his first day worked until 0500z.

  16. When the Pilot is finishing his work days.. Use the chart below to determine when a pilot would get the 3.65 hour credit if he is not to his residence airport by 2359z. • If the pilot is released in the lower 48 states by 1900z and gets to his residence airport by 2359z – then he does not get the 3.65 credit • If the pilot is released in the lower 48 states after 1900z and he gets to his residence airport by 2359z – then he does not get the 3.65 credit. • If the pilot is released in the lower 48 states after 1900z and gets to his residence airport after 2359z – then he does get the 3.65 credit. • If the pilot is released in the lower 48 states before 1900z and he gets to his residence airport after 2359z – then he does not get the 3.65 credit as long as his travel commenced before 2359z.

  17. Duty Day Start and Stop Times – Cont’d What the 5 hour slide means is this – • The company and the union have agreed to allow 5 hours at the start and end of the pilots work days to be for positioning to/from work. If it takes the pilot longer then 5 hours then it is considered a commute. • The deciding factor is where the pilot lives (his residence airport) and where we need him to be. For example, if a pilot’s residence airport is DEN and we need him to take a departure from EWR at 2100z, he will have to leave on a day off to get in position by a 0500z report. This may require the pilot to depart his residence airport on his day off. This is NOT a work day. However, if the pilot lives in PHX and we need him to depart from LAX at 2100z he very well could leave on his first work day and be in LAX in time to report at 0500z. Contract reference 17.A.1

  18. Flexibility with the 5 hour slide? Do you have any flexibility with the 5 hour slide if the pilot requests it? No – If you feel that operationally you need the pilot in place by 0500z (remember that bid line pilots are not automatically on reserve) then he must be in place by then…however Yes you do if… • If the pilot requests it and he can be scheduled to arrive at the departure city no less then 12 hours before departure. A good example would be a pilot who has a 0100z departure from EWR and he commutes from the west coast. He can be scheduled to depart on a red-eye and arrive in EWR aprox 10 to 11z and • You check with the SOD and the departure city weather is forecast to remain good and no pop-up trips are brewing. The only exception to this rule is AMC flights. The pilots for AMC trips must be in place to operate the flight no later then 12 hours before departure. If this means that we have to replace a bid line holder with a reserve and pay bid line guarantee then we will.

  19. Residence Airport – What is it? By contract definition the pilot’s residence airport is … an airport located within the contiguous forty-eight (48) states designated, as mutually agreed to between the Crewmember and the Company within one hundred (100) miles of the Crewmember’s residence on file or the nearest airport if such airport is outside the one hundred (100) mile radius. If the Company and the Crewmember cannot mutually agree upon the Resident Airport, the Company will designate the Resident Airport. Qualifying Resident Airports must have sufficient Part 121 air service to provide competitive airfares and frequency of flights. There shall be no minimum or maximum number of Resident Airports so designated. Once Crewmembers’ Resident Airports are established, they cannot be changed without the Crewmember’s consent unless the designated airports do not have sufficient Part 121 air service. The Crewmember will be returned to the Resident Airport in which he departed. The designated airport for the State of Alaska is Anchorage (PANC) and the designated airport for the State of Hawaii is Honolulu (PNHL). A Crewmember may elect to choose Detroit (KDTW) as his Resident Airport.

  20. Transition Days What are Transition Days? Exactly that – they are duty days designed for pilots to facilitate the movement of the airlines schedule from one month to the next. • They can extend to a maximum of 6 days into the new month. • They will not have reserve days built into them however they are subject to the R3 ‘trip reserve’ assignment and the 3.65 credit will trigger for this. • If the ‘transition days’ cause the pilot to exceed his 17 work days in the new month, he has the choice of selecting other work days to drop (to stay at 17 days) or taking the transition days as overtime. (Contract ref 17.K.4) Please remember to document his choice in the crew trac comments. • If the pilot elects to stay at 17 days and wants to drop days make sure you look at his entire schedule. Transition days are there for a reason and he should fly his trip out. However if he is off his schedule and is not needed for the transition days then these can also be dropped. Contract Reference 17.D.4

  21. Transition Days - Cont’d Please always keep in mind that ‘transition days’ are designed to smooth the flying from one month to the next. They are not to be used as ‘reserve days’ unless the following specific situation happens – • The pilot’s transition days cause him to exceed 17 days in the new month. He has rqstd that we drop days in the next trip to keep him at 17 works days. We do that and then the transition trip goes away – what do you do? • If the pilot has already dropped other days to stay at 17 work days the ‘transition days’ effectively become part of his 17 work days in the new month. If the transition trip then goes away – • Do what is operationally realistic but if you are able, give the pilot the choice of other flights on the original transition days or restore the day(s) that we had previously dropped later in his line

  22. Layover Days • Bid line holders on a trip are no longer automatically on reserve when they are at a layover station. • Captains are obligated to call on behalf of their crew when they arrive at a station. • We are to advise them at that time that a. We need them on R3 trip reserve starting after their crew rest and they receive a 3.65hr credit towards their monthly guarantee or b. Their next trip is xxx at xxxxz on the xx and to check in with us 24 hours from now. (If their next trip is more then 24 hours away) • If we release them for 24 hours then, by contract definition of “one in seven”, it will be considered an FAR 1/7 break. If you release the pilot for 24 hours then, as we all learn the contract, state “you are rlsd for 24 hours and this is also your FAR 1/7 break please call back at xxxxz on the xx” • Reserve holders are still on reserve at a layover station however practical application dictates that, if they are staying with the same crew, they be treated the same as the bid crew they are with. Reserve line holders DO NOT get the 3.65 hour credit. Contract Reference 17.D.5

  23. How can the 3.65 credit Trigger? Great care must be taken when dealing with bid line holders on layover days. The 3.65 hour credit can trigger by - • Telling the crew to standby and call back. • Telling them we may have something for them later. • Telling them they are on R3 ‘trip reserve’ It will not trigger if you – • Call or fax the crew to advise them of a delayed departure. • The fax must be detailed – Do not just say “call scheduling”. What you must do – Comment, comment, comment, comment in Crew Trac!!!

  24. Bid Line Guarantee, What it means and who gets it? Bid line guarantee means that the pilot will be paid no less then what the bid line pay was published at (or 62 hours if greater). • If a pilot bids a line that is published at 67 hours, bid line guarantee means that he will be paid no less then 67 hours (or actual time if greater) no matter what rescheduling happens to him on his line. • The only time he would not get bid line guarantee is if he initiates a change to his line. Self initiated changes would include, sick calls that cause him to miss a trip, vacation, any type of leave, personal requests to change his schedule made to us and so on. • The bottom line is that it could get very expensive for us so bid line holders should be removed from their line only when absolutely necessary and… Comment, comment, comment, comment in crew trac!!!! • Contract Ref 17.E

  25. Removal from Scheduled Bid Line The company has the contractual right to remove any pilot from his scheduled bid line. However there are several important items to keep in mind – • The pilot is going to be paid at least his bid line guarantee even if he does not fly it. • If we remove the pilot from his bid line and do not immediately assign him a new line of flying on his original duty days, he will be on R3 reserve status until we get him a trip. Remember that the R3 status triggers the 3.65 hour ‘credit’ toward his guarantee. Bottom line – • Every effort must be made NOT to remove a bid line holder from his trip and, if we have to, make sure we have other flying for him. • Comment, comment, comment, comment in crew trac!! Contract ref 17.E

  26. Minimum Consecutive Days Off – What does the 5 day minimum mean? The company and the union agreed that when a pilot holds a split line, the days off between the series of flying cannot be less then 5 days. What this means for us – • The company and union agreed that the two blocks of 5 days off can be consecutive. That is 3 days off at the start of the month and 10 days off later in the month would be the required 13 days off in a 30 day month. The 10 days in a row will be considered two 5 day blocks. (Note – as of 8/28 the intent of this paragraph is still under discussion) Contract reference 17.E.1.b

  27. Open Time and the 83 hour Bypass The company and union have agreed that open time assignments will be handled in the following manner – • Assign to a reserve • Assign to a ‘will fly’ crewmember in seniority order. (see the 83 hour bypass below) • Assign to remaining crewmembers on a scheduled duty free day off. • Assign to a management crewmember. Consideration will always be given to positioning the crewmember for crew rest if required. What is the 83 hour bypass? • When awarding open time to a ‘will fly’ crewmember we will bypass a pilot if the new trip will cause a conflict with his bid line or cause him to be projected to exceed 83 hours for the 30 day bid period. If no one else accepts the assignment we can then return to this ‘will fly’ pilot. Contract Reference 17.M

  28. Part 91 Flying and over 12 hours of Block Time The company has agreed that with any part 91 flying that exceeds 12 hours of block time, all best efforts will be made to heavy crew this assignment. What this means for us – • The good example is the LAX-ICN ferry leg at 12hrs 55 mins of flying. We will do all possible to heavy crew this assignment however the flight can proceed if we are not able to provide the additional Capt and F/E. Contract reference – 18.B.5.d

  29. Minimum Rest Times – Interruption of Rest The minimum rest time for a crew on an international layover has been changed to the following – • A minimum of 11 hours from release to report if the pilots actual duty period is less then 18 hours. • A minimum of 13 hours from release to report if the pilots actual duty period exceeds 18 hours. The minimum rest time for a crew on a domestic layover is – • 9 hours and in no case can it be less then 8 hours. It can and likely will be more then 9 hours to satisfy domestic FAR requirements What this means for us – • 13hrs 30mins is now the standard b/b crew rest time internationally • 15hrs 30mins b/b crew rest if the duty day exceeds 18 hours. • The pilot can agree to go with less then these rest requirements as long as they remain FAR legal. Contract Reference – 18.C.2 and 3

  30. Suspension of Duty The suspension of duty time provisions remain the same. There are two types of ‘suspended duty’. They are – • Suspension of duty time is – A period of time when a pilot can go ‘off duty’ without getting his normal prescribed rest. There are 2 parts of this … • Voluntary –Crew initiated due to unforeseen operational issues • Involuntary –Company initiated due to operational requirements. This is a minimum of 5 hours from release to report and the 5 hours should start when the pilot actually arrives at the hotel. Remember – Suspension of duty is primarily used for unforeseen operational requirements. Contract Reference 18.B.4

  31. Ground Deadhead Pay The pay for a pilot using ground transportation has been changed to.. • ½ of the published time between 2 points and if no published time exists it is ½ of the actual time Contract reference 19.H.2