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Jennifer L. Bloom, Ed.D . Clinical Associate Professor and Director, Higher Education & Student Affairs Program University of South Carolina jenny.bloom@sc.edu. THE APPRECIATIVE ADVISING REVOLUTION. Acknowledgments. The Privilege of Working in Higher Education.

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THE APPRECIATIVE ADVISING REVOLUTION


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    1. Jennifer L. Bloom, Ed.D. Clinical Associate Professor and Director, Higher Education & Student Affairs Program University of South Carolina jenny.bloom@sc.edu THE APPRECIATIVE ADVISINGREVOLUTION

    2. Acknowledgments

    3. The Privilege of Working in Higher Education “Education is the most powerful means of increasing individual opportunity and creating more prosperous, fairer, and more just societies. So to have the privilege of participating in that mission is as much as anybody could hope for in life.” • B. Joseph White, President of the University of Illinois Reiter, A. F. (2005). Meet Joe White: New UI president talks about leadership, goals and responsibility.”Illinois Alumni Magazine, 17(5), 20–23.

    4. Overview • Defining Academic Advising • Appreciative Advising • Defining Appreciative Advising • The Six Phases of Appreciative Advising

    5. O’Banion’s Definition O’Banion, T. (1994). An academic advising model. NACADA Journal, 14(2), 10–16. (Original work published 1972)

    6. Chickering’s Definition “The fundamental purpose of academic advising is to help students become effective agents for their own lifelong learning and personal development. Our relationships with students – the questions we raise, the perspectives we share, the resources we suggest, the short-term decisions and long-range plans we help them think through – all should aim to increase their capacity to take charge of their own existence.”

    7. “High impact advisors realize that the positive outcomes of advising sessions are not just limited to students; in fact, the real joy of advising occurs when advisors understand how fulfilling it is to really impact other peoples’ lives and how much they can learn from their advisees.” - Jennifer Bloom

    8. Appreciative Advising Definition “Appreciative Advising is the intentional collaborative practice of asking positive, open-ended questions that help students optimize their educational experiences and achieve their dreams, goals, and potentials.” • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    9. Does Appreciative Advising work? YES! • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    10. Dismissal Contracts - UNCG • Participants: In a Fall 2006 pilot, the AA approach was used with students who were readmitted to the university after academic dismissal. • Procedure: Students were asked to voluntarily commit to several AA sessions over their first semester back. • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    11. UNCG Dismissal Contract Results • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    12. UNCG SAS 100 Retention Rates • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    13. What is Appreciative Inquiry? • “Appreciative Inquiry is the cooperative search for the best in people, their organizations, and the world around them…AI involves the art and practice of asking questions that strengthen a system’s capacity to heighten positive potential” (p. 10). Cooperrider, D. L., & Whitney, D. (2000). A Positive Revolution in Change: Appreciative Inquiry. In D. L. Cooperrider, P.F. Sorensen, Jr., D. Whitney, and T.F. Yaeger (Eds.), Appreciative inquiry: Rethinking human organization toward a positive theory of change (pp. 3–27). Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    14. The Four Phases of Appreciative Inquiry • Discovery • Dream • Design • Destiny

    15. The Six Phases of Appreciative Advising • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (in preparation). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    16. Appreciative Advising Phases • Disarm– Recognizing the importance of first impressions, create a safe, welcoming environment for students. • Discover - Utilize positive open-ended questions to draw out what they enjoy doing, their strengths, and their passions. Listen to each answer carefully before asking the next positive question. • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    17. Appreciative Advising Phases (continued) • Dream - Help students formulate a vision of what they might become, and then assist them in developing their life and career goals. • Design – Help students devise concrete, incremental, and achievable goals • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    18. Appreciative Advising Phases (continued) • Deliver – The students follows through on their plans. The advisor is there for them when they stumble, believing in them every step of the way and helping them continue to update and refine their dreams as they go. • Don’t Settle – The advisor challenges the student to proactively raise the student’s internal bar of self- expectations • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    19. Disarm Phase Disarm • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    20. Definition of Disarm Disarm • “To overcome or allay the suspicion, hostility, or antagonism of. • To win the confidence of.” http://www.dictionary.com

    21. Even Santa has to Disarm Disarm

    22. Which grade do you want to talk about? English - A History - A Biology - B Phys Ed - B+ Math - F Disarm Rath, T., & Clifton, D. O. (2004). How full is your bucket? Positive strategies for work and life. New York: Gallup Press.

    23. Important AdvisorBehaviors Disarm • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    24. What is Immediacy? Disarm • The perception of physical and psychological closeness between communicators (specifically, between students and their professors) • Principle: “People are drawn toward persons and things they like, evaluate highly, and prefer; and they avoid or move away from things they dislike, evaluate negatively, or do not prefer.” Direct Quotes from Rocca, K. A. Presentation at the “Student Motivations and Attitudes: The Role of the Affective Domain in Geoscience Learning” conference, Northfield, MN. February 12, 2007

    25. Nonverbal Immediacy Behaviors Disarm • Gestures • Vocal Variety • Smiling at students • Relaxed body posture • Removal of distractions • Eye contact • Professional casual dress Direct Quotes from Rocca, K. A. Presentation at the “Student Motivations and Attitudes: The Role of the Affective Domain in Geoscience Learning” conference, Northfield, MN. February 12, 2007

    26. Verbal Immediacy Behaviors Disarm • Calling students by name • Use of inclusive pronouns • Unrelated small talk • Feedback to students • Asking for student feedback • Use of own first name Direct Quotes from Rocca, K. A. Presentation at the “Student Motivations and Attitudes: The Role of the Affective Domain in Geoscience Learning” conference, Northfield, MN. February 12, 2007

    27. Discover Phase Discover • Bloom, J. and Martin, N.A. (2002, August 29). Incorporating appreciative inquiry into academic advising. The Mentor: An Academic Advising Journal, 4 (3). http://www.psu.edu/dus/mentor/020829jb.htm

    28. Definition of Discover • “to see, get knowledge of, learn of, find, or find out; gain sight or knowledge of (something previously unseen or unknown) • to notice or realize • To identify (a person) as a potentially prominent performer” Discover http://www.dictionary.com

    29. Important Advisor Behaviors Ask positive open questions that help us learn our students’ stories Discover • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    30. Important Advisor Behaviors • Affirming/rephrasing/ summarizing what student is saying: • “I’m impressed by…..” • Pointing out specific times the student took initiative (creator instead of victim language) Discover • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    31. Roles • Question Asker • Question Answerer Discover

    32. Discover Questions to Ask Your Partner Discover • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    33. Discover Questions for Students Discover Habley, W. R., & Bloom, J. L. (2007). Giving advice that makes a difference. In G. L. Kramer (Ed.), Fostering student success in the campus community (pp. 171–92). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    34. Dream Phase Dream • Bloom, J. and Martin, N.A. (2002, August 29). Incorporating appreciative inquiry into academic advising. The Mentor: An Academic Advising Journal, 4 (3). http://www.psu.edu/dus/mentor/020829jb.htm

    35. Definition of Dream • “An aspiration; goal; aim • A condition or achievement that is longed for” Dream http://www.dictionary.com

    36. Great Dreamers Dream

    37. Important AdvisorBehaviors • Listen purposefully • Make connections between information from the Discover phase and dreams being shared during this phase. Is there congruency between the two phases? • Encourage students to be open to the possibilities and remind them that there is more than one right answer Dream • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    38. Dream Questions for Students Dream • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    39. Design Design Phase • Bloom, J. and Martin, N.A. (2002, August 29). Incorporating appreciative inquiry into academic advising. The Mentor: An Academic Advising Journal, 4 (3). http://www.psu.edu/dus/mentor/020829jb.htm

    40. Design Design

    41. Design Important Advisor Behaviors • Explain technical info in easy to understand language • Avoid confusing acronyms • “That’s a good question” • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    42. Design Important Advisor Behaviors • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    43. Design Personal Presidential Cabinet The buck stops here Bloom, J. L. (2008). Moving on from college. In V. Gordon, W. R. Habley, & T. Grites (Eds.), Academic advising: A comprehensive handbook (2nd ed.).

    44. Design Important AdvisorBehaviors • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    45. Design Design PhaseDeveloping an Action Plan • Work together to set goals and specific sub-goals • Establish a realistic timeline for accomplishment of goals • Clarify who is responsible for what by what date • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    46. Design Design Questions for Students Habley, W. R., & Bloom, J. L. (2007). Giving advice that makes a difference. In G. L. Kramer (Ed.), Fostering student successin the campus community (pp. 171-192). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    47. Deliver Phase Deliver • Bloom, J. and Martin, N.A. (2002, August 29). Incorporating appreciative inquiry into academic advising. The Mentor: An Academic Advising Journal, 4 (3). http://www.psu.edu/dus/mentor/020829jb.htm

    48. Definition of Deliver Deliver • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    49. Important Advisor Behaviors • Review what you have accomplished in this session • Review the student’s responsibilities and your responsibilities and the deadlines you have co-established • Encourage the student to contact you with any problems or concerns • Reiterate your confidence that the student can indeed accomplish the goals set forth Deliver • Bloom, J. L., Hutson, B. L., & He, Y. (2008). The appreciative advising revolution. Champaign, IL: Stipes Publishing.

    50. Energizing Students to Be Their Best “Simply put, a leader’s job is to energize others. Notice that I don’t say it’s part of their job; it is their job. There is no ‘time off’ when a leader isn’t responsible for energizing others. Every interaction a leader has is either going to positively energize those around them or negatively energize them” (p. 297). Deliver Tichy, N. M. (2002). The Leadership Engine. Harper Collins Publishers Inc., New York.