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PA IN DEVELOPED NATIONS. TOPICS. Quote of the day Evolution of PA in developed systems Similar but not equal Key characteristics of developed vis a vis developing PA systems Historical growth of government Paradigms in Public Administration Old PA

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topics
TOPICS
  • Quote of the day
  • Evolution of PA in developed systems
  • Similar but not equal
  • Key characteristics of developed vis a vis developing PA systems
  • Historical growth of government
  • Paradigms in Public Administration

Old PA

Paradigm shift: the New Public Administration

The New Public Service: A new paradigm?

quote of the day
Quote of the day

“The important thing for Government is not to do things which individuals are doing already, and to do them a little better or a little worse; but to do those things which at present are not done at all.”

John Maynard Keynes: The End of Laissez-Faire (London, 1926) Cited in Oser (1970:394)

evolution of pa in developed systems
Evolution of PA in developed systems
  • According to Jreisat three revolutions (English 1688, American 1776 and French 1785) marked the development of modern political thought which provides the fundamentals of modern social organization.
  • The liberal state that emerged from these revolutions emphasized the following:
historical growth of government
Historical growth of government
  • There exist three inflexion points in the historical growth of government
  • The great depression ended the laissez-faire dream and opened the door to government intervention often known as the Keynesian model.
  • The postwar years (1945-1970) of the welfare state expanded government action from macroeconomic management towards redistribution . The Old Public Administration.
  • The raise of neoconservative governments (Reagan & Thatcher) and the New Public Administration philosophy.
usa gov expenditures as of gdp
USA Gov. Expenditures as % of GDP

Reagan

Years

Great

Depression

WWII

Ends

Source: Holcombe:1996

international comparisons
INTERNATIONAL COMPARISONS

Source: Savas 2000:20 * INEGI

federal employment per 1000
Federal Employment Per 1000

Source: OECD Public Management Service

slide15

Source: OECD for employment and expenditures

Corruption index 1 most corrupt 10 least corrupt: Source The Economist

paradigms in pa
Paradigms in PA
  • It guides research on problems and solutions
  • A paradigm governs in the first instance, not a subject matter, but a group of practitioners
  • A paradigm commits the group of practitioners to a disciplinary matrix (methods, language, questions, values, etc.)
  • There will be “paradigm shifts” or “paradigm competition” but never a lack of paradigm (s) unless the field becomes simply speculative and unscientific. To reject a paradigm without substitution is to reject science itself
  • PA revolves around three main paradigms: Old PA, New PA, and New Public Service
paradigm competition
Paradigm Competition

Source: Denhardt & Denhardt (2003: 28-29)

slide24

(Knowledge Management)

Notes: Group 1: Countries whose scores on the average of the two indicators are significantly above the average of OECD member countries: x>(average*std*(2^(-1/2)))Group 2: Countries whose scores on the average of the two indicators are not significantly different from the OECD average. (average+std*(2^(-1/2)))>x>(average-std*(2^(-1/2)))Group 3: Countries whose scores on the average of the two indicators are significantly above the OECD average: (average-std*(2^(-1/2)))>x