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Overcoming Common Challenges: Tips on Engaging Families at Juvenile Justice Facility Schools

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Overcoming Common Challenges: Tips on Engaging Families at Juvenile Justice Facility Schools. Introductory Remarks Marlene Darwin, NDTAC. About NDTAC. Neglected-Delinquent TA Center (NDTAC) Contract between U.S. Department of Education (ED) and the American Institutes for Research

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Presentation Transcript
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Introductory Remarks

Marlene Darwin, NDTAC

about ndtac
About NDTAC
  • Neglected-Delinquent TA Center (NDTAC)
  • Contract between U.S. Department of Education (ED) and the American Institutes for Research
    • John McLaughlin Federal Program Manager, Title I, Part D Neglected, Delinquent, or At Risk Program
  • NDTAC’s Mission:
    • Develop a uniform evaluation model
    • Provide technical assistance
    • Serve as a facilitator between different organizations, agencies, and interest groups
agenda and presenters
Agenda and Presenters

A Family Guide to Getting Involved With Correctional Education

  • Trina Osher, President, Huff Osher Consulting, Inc.

Translating Family Engagement Tips into Successful Practice

    • Brenda Johnson, Transition Coordinator, Stadium View School
    • LiaVenchi, Teacher/Literacy Specialist, Stadium View School

Question and Answer Session

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A Family Guide to Getting Involved With Correctional Education Trina Osher, M.A.

President, Huff Osher Consulting, Inc.

family involvement matters
Family Involvement Matters!
  • “The evidence is consistent, positive, and convincing: families have a major influence on their children’s achievement in school and through life.”

(Henderson, A.T., & Mapp, K.L. (2002). A new wave of evidence: The impact of school, family, and community connections on student achievement. Austin, TX: National Center for Family & Community Connections with Schools, Southwest Educational Development Laboratory, 7).

  • Getting involved with correctional education can be challenging for many families.
  • Encouraging families to get involved can be challenging for facility and program staff.
ndtac has tools to help
NDTAC Has Tools to Help!
  • Working With Families of Children in the Juvenile Justice and Corrections Systems: A Guide for Education Program Leaders, Principals, and Building Administrators
    • Strategies staff at correctional education facilities and programs can use to increase family involvement
    • Three-tier model for organizing efforts to engage families
  • Facility Toolkit for Engaging Families in Their Child's Education at a Juvenile Justice Facility
    • Tools for families
    • Tools for facility staff
  • Family Guide to Getting Involved in Your Child's Education at a Juvenile Justice Facility
    • Practical strategies for common situations
three tier model to engage families
Three-Tier Model to Engage Families

Intensive: 3rd Tier

Selective: 2nd Tier

Universal: 1st Tier

Special efforts for a few families

Additional supports

to boost some families

Opportunities afforded

to all families

facility toolkit
Facility Toolkit

The Facility Toolkit includes:

  • Information for facilities and stakeholders about how to use the Family Guide
  • Customizable tools that can be used to help promote family participation in a student’s education
    • Tools 1–5, including a Family Guide, sample letters, a tip sheet, and a questionnaire, are intended for distribution to students’ families.
    • Tools 6–8, including a facility tip sheet and planning tool, are intended for use by facility staff.
all tools are customizable
All tools are customizable
  • Facility and program staff are encouraged to customize the Family Guide for their setting.
  • Some items in the Tool Kit are templates that can be modified.
    • Facility staff should review tool kit materials for families carefully.
    • Discuss materials with some family members of currently enrolled or recently graduated students.
    • Partner with families to adapt materials to accurately reflect the policies and practices of their school, program, or facility.
family guide
Family Guide
  • The Family Guide should be shared with parents and family members as soon as their child is enrolled in the program. It includes practical strategies families can use to:
    • Build a relationship with their child’s correctional education program
    • Keep their son or daughter on track for completing school and becoming a successful young adult
family guide1
Family Guide

The Family Guide includes information for families about:

  • Getting off to a good start
  • Ensuring that their child is making academic progress
  • Preparing for their child’s return home
  • Connecting with other families
  • Taking action when things are not going well
  • Advocating for better programming, family involvement, and support
  • Staying connected to the correctional education program
translating family engagement tips into successful practice

Translating Family Engagement Tips into Successful Practice

Brenda Johnson, Transition Coordinator, Stadium View School

Lia Venchi, Teacher/Literacy

Specialist, Stadium View School

about stadium view school minneapolis public schools hennepin county juvenile detention center
About Stadium View SchoolMinneapolis Public SchoolsHennepin County Juvenile Detention Center
  • Short term facility
  • Mostly students of color, predominantly Black
  • Students detained on serious charges
  • 12 staff: 8 teachers, a transition specialist, a

principal and a life skills coach

  • Serve also students in the adult facility
  • Nationally accredited
connecting with family
Connecting with Family
  • Sunday visitation
  • “Meet and Greet” with community partners
  • Classroom “Meet and Greet” with follow-up phone call home
  • Parent Council monthly meetings
  • Calendar
how families connect with us
How Families Connect with Us
  • Transition Specialist as point person
  • Student referral
  • Lobby display
  • Facility supervisors
  • Community partners
facilitating parent visits
Facilitating Parent Visits
  • Community Showcase (celebrate student success)
  • Court support
  • Freedom School Showcase
  • Evening student debates
  • IEP meetings
  • Parent Council meetings
tips for engaging families
Tips for Engaging Families
  • Facilitate transportation, childcare stipends, meeting dinners
  • Home visits
  • Connect and facilitate community to support student and family
  • Build trust through relationships
building relationships
Building Relationships
  • Each interaction with a student and family member is with the highest level of respect and sincerity
  • Respect and care are foundation of student/staff interaction
  • Staff are required to provide educational and social-emotional support
  • No judgment
effective communication
Effective Communication
  • Staff regularly reflects on our commitment to our vision and mission
  • Student Support Team meets weekly to discuss students’ academic and social-emotional well being
  • Staff has on-going communication training
  • Transition Specialist as point person
sharing information
Sharing Information
  • IEP meetings include teachers, support staff, student and family members
  • Letters and phone calls announce events and meetings
  • 15 day academic report
providing opportunities for visits
Providing Opportunities for Visits
  • Juvenile justice, community and school systems work together
  • Freedom School, debates, visiting authors and guests
  • Work to support engagement between community partners and families
  • When appropriate, include parents and JDC staff in professional development (we learn together)
ensuring staff meet needs
Ensuring Staff Meet Needs
  • Weekly Student Support Team meetings
  • Staff attend IEP meetings
  • Over 100 hours each year of professional development
  • Staff, student surveys, observations
  • Community partners as critical friends
  • Pacer Center/Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities
contact information
Contact Information

Brenda Johnson, Transition Specialist

Work: 612.543.0762

Cell: 612.490.5249

Larry Lucio, Principal

Work: 612.596.1158

Lia Venchi, Teacher

Cell: 651.247.1908

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