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Nuremberg Laws. By: Wes, Gloria, and James. What They Were. The Nuremberg Laws of 1935 were antisemitic laws in Nazi Germany which were introduced at the annual Nazi Party rally in Nuremberg.

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nuremberg laws

Nuremberg Laws

By: Wes, Gloria, and James

what they were
What They Were
  • The Nuremberg Laws of 1935 were antisemitic laws in Nazi Germany which were introduced at the annual Nazi Party rally in Nuremberg.
  • The laws officially classified people as Jewish if 3 or 4 of their grandparents were Jewish. It also classified those with 1 or 2 Jewish grandparents as a “Mischling” or crossbreed.
introduction of the laws
Introduction of the Laws
  • On September 15th, 1935 two measures were introduced. The first one The Law for the Protection of German Blood and German Honourprohibited marriage and intercourse between “Jews” and “Germans.”
  • The second law The Reich Citizenship Law stripped persons not of German blood of their citizenship and introduced a distinction between “Reich Citizens” and “Nationals.”
aftermath
Aftermath
  • Although the Nuremberg Laws were not the first antisemitic laws passed in Germany, they were the first to draw a clear distinction of who was a Jew and who was a German.
  • It is also ironic to note that even though Nuremberg was used to pass these discriminatory laws, it was also where the Nazi leaders went on trial, many of them being hanged.