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Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs. http://schoolmeals.nal.usda.gov/FBG/buyingguide.html. History of Food Buying Guides. 1947 – Quantities of Food for Serving School Lunches 1955 – The Food Buying Guide for Type A School Lunches

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slide2

Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs

http://schoolmeals.nal.usda.gov/FBG/buyingguide.html

history of food buying guides
History of Food Buying Guides
  • 1947 – Quantities of Food for Serving School Lunches
  • 1955 – The Food Buying Guide for Type A School Lunches
  • 1984 – Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs
  • 1993 and 1995 Supplements Added
1996 major revision began
1996 Major Revision Began
  • USDA received petitions for new food items
  • Validity of a number of yields were questioned
development of the 2001 guide
Development of the 2001 Guide
  • Develop a list of the foods that needed to be updated
  • Proposed yield study
  • FNS signed interagency agreement with Natick
so what happened next
So What Happened Next?
  • FNS found many yields lower than in the 1984 buying guide
  • FNS and NATICK conducted further studies on 42 products
  • Follow-up studies ended in March 2000
  • At the same time FNS solicited comments
  • FBG postponed and FNS undertook thorough review of all the food study data
moving forward
Moving Forward
  • Keep the meat yields from the 1984 FBG
  • Include some new meat items
  • Include additional items
  • Finally a new food buying guide
fbg new features
FBG New Features
  • New food items added/revised
  • Food safety warnings
  • Additional calculation examples
  • New tables and charts
  • Meal patterns
  • Grains/breads instruction and flow chart
  • Expanded index
new features appendices
New Features--Appendices
  • A – Recipe Analysis
  • B – Using Column 6 for Recipe Analysis
  • C – CN Labeling Program
  • D – Food Purchasing
  • E – Resources
column headings are the same
Column Headings Are the Same
  • Food as purchased, AP
  • Purchase unit
  • Servings per purchase unit
  • Serving size per meal contribution
  • Purchase units for 100 servings
  • Additional information
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Column 1

Food As Purchased, AP

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Column 2

Purchase Unit

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Column 3

Servings per Purchase Unit, EP

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Column 4

Servings Size per Meal Contribution

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Column 5

Purchase Units for 100 Servings

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Column 6

Additional Information

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Example 1

Ground Beef

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Example 1

Ground Beef

Need 60 servings

  • Column 1 reads “ground beef, not more than 20% fat, includes USDA commodity”
  • Column 2 reads “pound”
  • Column 3 reads “7.89” (servings)
  • Column 4 reads “cooked lean meat”
calculate amount of beef for 60
Calculate Amount of Beef for 60
  • Number of servings needed: 60
  • Servings per purchase unit: 7.89
  • 60 divided by 7.89 = 7.6

You will need 7.75 pounds of USDA commodity ground beef, not more than 16% fat to serve 60 1.5 ounce servings of cooked ground beef

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Example 2

Using Column 6

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Example 2

Using Column 6

  • Step 1: column 6 yield information = 0.81 lb ready-to-cook broccoli (from 1 lb untrimmed broccoli)
  • Step 2: 5.62 lb trimmed broccoli needed divided by the yield of 0.81 = 6.93 lb
  • Round up to 7 lb
stir fry recipe calling for 5 10 oz broccoli
Stir-fry Recipe Calling for 5# 10 oz Broccoli
  • 5 # 10 oz broccoli needed
  • Use table reference to convert 10 oz to .62 decimal equivalent
  • 1 lb AP = 0.81 lb ready to cook
  • 5.62 divided by 0.81 = 6.93 lb
  • Round up to 7 pounds
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A: Is the food product labeled as whole grain?
  • B: Is the food product labeled as enriched?
  • C: Is the food product a fortified cereal?
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D: In the ingredient statement, is the primary grain ingredient labeled labeled as enriched?
  • E: In the ingredient statement, is the primary grain ingredient designated as a whole-grain?
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F: Do you have documentation from the manufacturer that the primary grain ingredient is a whole grain?

Joe’s Bakery

6544 Cedar Drive

Laurentis, KY 65432

Thank you for purchasing Joe’s 7 Grain Bread. Our fine product is made using wheat flour and the following creditable grains: whole rye, whole buckwheat, brown rice, whole corn, whole millet, and wheat bran.

The total amount of creditable whole grains, brown rice and wheat used in this product is 42% of our formulation.

Sincerely,

Joe

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G: In the ingredient statement, is the primary grain ingredient bran or germ?
  • H1: Does the ingredient statement list a creditable grain or grains, but the primary grain ingredient is not creditable?
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Joe’s Bakery

6544 Cedar Drive

Laurentis, KY 65432

Thank you for purchasing Joe’s 7 Grain Bread. Our fine product is made using wheat flour and the following creditable grains: whole rye, whole buckwheat, brown rice, whole corn, whole millet, and wheat bran.

The total amount of creditable whole grains, brown rice and wheat used in this product is 42% of our formulation.

Sincerely,

Joe

  • H2: Do you have documentation from the manufacturer provide=ing the gram weight of the creditable grains, and that the grains used in the product are whole grain?
joe s 7 grain bread is creditable
Joe’s 7 Grain Bread Is Creditable

But how much credit will one portion of this product provide towards the meal pattern requirement?

there are two methods to determine the serving size to meet program requirements
There Are Two Methods to Determine the Serving Size to Meet Program Requirements.
  • Use exhibit A of the grains/breads instruction
  • Determine the actual amount of creditable grains contained in the product
grains breads crediting
Grains/Breads Crediting
  • Manufacturer’s documentation: 42% creditable grains
  • Find the weight of one slice of Joe’s 7 grain bread --- one slice = 2.0 ounces
  • Multiply: weight in ounces x the percent creditable grains in the product formulation: 2 ounces x 0.42 = 0.84 ounces of creditable grain in each slice of Joe’s 7 grain bread
convert ounce weight to grams
Convert Ounce Weight to Grams
  • Multiply the ounces of creditable grains by the factor 28.35 grams per ounce.(28.35 grams = 1 ounce) 0.84 x 28.35 = 23.81
  • There are 23.81 grams of creditable grains in each slice of Joe’s bread
  • Divide 23.81 by the grams in one grains/breads serving.23.81 divide by 14.75 = 1.61
  • Round down to nearest quarter. Each slice of Joe’s bread provides 1.50 grains/breads servings creditable towards a reimbursable meal