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Great Expectations

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  1. Great Expectations Chapters20-25

  2. Vocabulary • Chapter 20: • Confectioner: a person who makes or deals in candy • Equipage: a horse-drawn carriage with is servants • Guileless: candid; innocent; naïve • Infernal: relating to the world of the dead; fiendish; diabolical • Oppressed: burdened or demoralized • Perusal: careful examination • Relinquish: to let go • Scabbard: a sheath for a sword or dagger • Supplicant: a person who pleads or prays • Chapter 21: • Brooch: an ornamental pin • Dilapidated: fallen into a state of disrepair or decay, usually as a result of neglect • Dints: dents • Disembodied: with out body; removed from the body • Disgorged: discharged or spit out • Doleful: full of grief • Interment: burial of the dead

  3. Vocabulary • Chapter 22 • Acquiesce: to comply passively with another’s will • Asseverate: to declare or affirm positively • Avaricious: greedy, specially for money or other material possessions • Broach: to mention or bring up • Circumjacent: in the surrounding area • Congelation: the process of making solid; coagulation • Degradation: a decline to a lower quality of station; extreme humiliation • Haughty: arrogant or proud • Imbue: to influence fully, pervade; to saturate or stain • Incipient: just beginning or becoming apparent • Inveterate: deep-rooted; habitual; persistent • Lamentation: an expression of grief • Languor: laziness; weariness • Magnanimous: noble or generous • Mortification: embarrassment or shame • Perplexity: utter bewilderment or confusion • Prepossessions: attitudes or impressions formed ahead of time • Prophesy: to predict or see the future • Propitiate: to attempt to pacify or regain the favor of another, especially one with power or authority • Requisite: essential, necessary • Shod: wearing a shoe

  4. Chapter 20 • There is very little plot advancement in this chapter. What, then, is its purpose, and which new character are we introduced to? • Describe Mr. Jaggers. • What does the description of Jaggers’ office tell the reader about its occupant?

  5. Chapter 21 • How are Pip’s and Wemmick’s idea of crime different? • There is a coincidence in this chapter that reveals the name of the boy Pip boxed with many years ago at Miss Havisham’s house. What is this person’s name?

  6. Chapter 22 • Who do the Pockets feel is Pip’s benefactor? • How does Herbert feel about Pip’s great expectations? • What is the reason for Miss Havisham’s life in seclusion?

  7. Chapter 23 • What kind of tone has been set up in the last chapter and continues in Chapter 23? • What is the source of satire in Mrs. Pocket’s pretentious (conceited) nature? • What might Dickens be implying about early marriage?

  8. Chapter 24 • What does Pip’s benefactor intend for Pip, if it says that Pip is “not designed for any profession”? 2. How does the characterization of Mr. Jaggers’ housekeeper illustrate Mr. Jaggers’ powers? 3. Why does Dickens have Wemmick create the topic of Jaggers’ housekeeper?

  9. Chapter 25 • How does Wemmick feel about his home? • Dickens uses dichotomy as a concrete reminder that there is usually more to people than initially appears on the surface. Discuss the following dichotomies found within characters: a. Describe Wemmick’s dual life. b. Miss Havisham is wealthy, but _________. c. Estella is beautiful, but __________. d. Joe is illiterate, but ______________. e. Biddy is a poor orphan, but __________. Use the following words to help fill in the blanks above.