co sleeping n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Co Sleeping PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Co Sleeping

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 11

Co Sleeping - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 180 Views
  • Uploaded on

Co Sleeping. The safety of bringing a baby into an adult bed has been the subject of much debate in modern society, especially recently.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Co Sleeping' - abba


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide2

The safety of bringing a baby into an adult bed has been the subject of much debate in modern society, especially recently.

  • In 1999, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) announced a recommendation against co-sleeping with a baby under age two. Nevertheless, some polls show that nearly 70% of parents do share sleep with their babies either part or all of the night. Most parents who do choose to co-sleep are avidly committed to the practice and find many benefits in it.
slide3

The CPSC's warning is controversial and has stirred heated debate among parents, doctors, and childhood development experts about the accuracy and appropriateness of the recommendation; many experts believe that the issue demands more research. In the meantime, it is very important that you investigate all the viewpoints and make the right decision for your family.

  • And remember: Even if you decide against sleeping with your infant, you can look forward to sharing sleep with your older baby if that suits your family.
slide4

Your bed must be absolutely safe for your baby. The best choice is to place the mattress on the floor, making sure there are no crevices that your baby can become wedged in. Make certain your mattress is flat, firm, and smooth. Do not allow your baby to sleep on a soft surface such as a waterbed, sofa, pillowtop mattress, beanbag chair, or any other flexible and yielding structure.

  • Make certain that your fitted sheets stay secure and cannot be pulled loose.
  • If your bed is raised off the floor, use mesh guardrails to prevent baby from rolling off the bed, and be especially careful that there is no space between the mattress and headboard or footboard. (Some guardrails designed for older children are not safe for babies because they have spaces that could entrap tiny bodies.)
  • If your bed is placed against a wall or against other furniture, check every night to be sure there is no space between the mattress and wall or furniture where baby could become stuck.
  • An infant should be placed between his mother and the wall or guardrail. Fathers, siblings, grandparents, and babysitters don't have the same instinctual awareness of a baby's location as do mothers. Mothers: Pay attention to your own sensitivity to baby. Your little one should be able to awaken you with a minimum of movement or noise — often even a sniff or snort is usually enough. If you find that you sleep so deeply that you only wake when your baby lets out a loud cry, seriously consider moving baby out of your bed, perhaps into a cradle or crib near your bedside.
slide5

Use a large mattress to provide ample room and comfort for everyone.

  • Consider a “sidecar” arrangement in which baby's crib or cradle sits directly beside the main bed.
  • Make certain that the room your baby sleeps in, and any room he might have access to, is childproof. (Imagine your baby crawling out of bed as you sleep to explore the house. Even if he has not done this — yet — you can be certain he eventually will!)
  • Do not ever sleep with your baby if you have been drinking alcohol, if you have used any drugs or medications, if you are an especially sound sleeper, or if you are suffering from sleep deprivation and find it difficult to wake.
  • Do not sleep with your baby if you are a large person, as a parent's excess weight poses a proven risk to baby in a co-sleeping situation. I cannot give you a specific weight-to-baby ratio; simply examine how you and baby settle in next to each other. If baby rolls towards you, if there is a large dip in the mattress, or if you suspect any other dangerous situations, play it safe and move baby to a bedside crib or cradle.
slide6

Remove all pillows and blankets during the early months. Use extreme caution when adding pillows or blankets as your baby gets older. Dress baby and yourselves warmly for sleep. (A tip for breastfeeding moms: wear an old turtleneck or t-shirt, cut up the middle to the neckline, as an undershirt for extra warmth.) Keep in mind that body heat will add warmth during the night. Make sure your baby doesn't become overheated.

  • Do not wear nightclothes with strings or long ribbons. Don't wear jewelry to bed, and if your hair is long, pin it up.
  • Don't use strong-smelling perfumes or lotions that may affect your baby's delicate senses.
  • Do not allow pets to sleep in bed with your baby.
  • Never leave your baby alone in an adult bed unless that bed is perfectly safe for your baby, such as a firm mattress on the floor in a childproof room, and when you are nearby or listening in on baby with a reliable baby monitor. As of the writing of this book, no proven safety devices exist for use in protecting a baby in an adult bed. However, a number of new inventions are beginning to appear in baby catalogs and stores in answer to the great number of parents who wish to sleep safely with their babies. You may want to look into some of these nests, wedges, cradles, sheet securers, etc.
co sleeping cons
Co-Sleeping Cons
  • According to the CPSC, at least 515 deaths were linked to infants and toddlers under 2 years of age sleeping in adult beds from January 1990 to December 1997:
  • 121 of the deaths were attributed to a parent, caregiver, or sibling rolling on top of or against a baby while sleeping
  • more than 75% of the deaths involved infants younger than 3 months old
who should not co sleep with infants
Who Should NOT Co-Sleep with Infants
  • Those who should not cosleep with an infant, however, include:
  • other children — particularly toddlers — because they might not be aware of the baby's presence
  • parents who are under the influence of alcohol or any drug because that could diminish their awareness of the baby
  • parents who smoke because the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is greater
slide10
Cons
  • CPSC also reported more than 100 infant deaths between January 1999 and December 2001 attributable to hidden hazards for babies on adult beds, including:
  • suffocation when an infant gets trapped or wedged between a mattress and headboard, wall, or other object
  • suffocation resulting from a baby being face-down on a waterbed, a regular mattress, or on soft bedding such as pillows, blankets, or quilts
  • strangulation in a bed frame that allows part of an infant's body to pass through an area while trapping the baby's head
  • In addition to the potential safety risks, sharing a bed with a baby can sometimes prevent parents from getting a good night's sleep. And infants who co-sleep can learn to associate sleep with being close to a parent in the parent's bed, which may become a problem at naptime or when the infant needs to go to sleep before the parent is ready.
transitioning
Transitioning
  • Transitioning to the crib by 6 months is usually easier — for both parents and baby — before the cosleeping habit is ingrained and other developmental issues (such as separation anxiety) come into play. Eventually, though, the cosleeping routine will likely be broken at some point, either naturally because the child wants to or by the parents' choice.