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Textbook Cover

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Textbook Cover

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  1. PowerPoint Presentation Textbook Cover PublisherThe Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.Tinley Park, Illinois Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  2. Chapter 1 • Fundamentals of Housing Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  3. Chapter 1 Overview • Introduction • Factors Affecting Housing Choices • Location • Climate • Availability • Cost • Taste • Lifestyle (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  4. Chapter 1 Overview • Types of Housing Available • Tract houses • Custom houses • Manufactured houses • Mobile homes • Cooperatives • Condominiums • Rentals Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  5. Objectives • List physical factors outside the house that affect housing choices. • Explain the relationship between lifestyle and housing choices. • Describe the seven main types of housing. • Determine the strengths and weaknesses of different types of housing. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  6. Introduction • Housingincludes all that is within the dwelling and all that surrounds it. • Housing is the creation of a special environment in which people live. • Housing affects the way people feel and act. • The term lifespace is often used to describe housing. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  7. Factors Affecting Housing Choices • These factors must be considered to achieve a functional solution to the housing challenge: • location • climate • availability • cost • taste • lifestyle Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  8. Location • Location refers to the specific placement of the home, such as: • urban, suburban, and rural • seashore, mountain, desert, and so forth • A home should reflect the character of the area. (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  9. A Hillside Home • This house is well suited for a large, open site. Photo Courtesy of James Hardie® Siding Products Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  10. Location • Most city homes are compact and multilevel structures because lots are small. • Building materials and furnishings can be affected by the location. • A home is part of a neighborhood and should be viewed in that setting. (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  11. A Florida Home • A home in Florida should differ in design and materials from a home in Minnesota. WCI Communities, Inc. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  12. A Minnesota Home • This home looks sturdy and warm enough for its Minnesota location. Photo Courtesy of James Hardie® Siding Products Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  13. Location • Shopping, education, worship, and other facilities should be considered when choosing housing. • Selecting the right neighborhood may be a bigger task than determining the basic requirements for the home. • Remember, a home cannot be separated from its neighborhood. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  14. Climate • Climate is a major consideration in housing choices. • The choice of the climate automatically affects the choice of housing design. • Northern homes need ample insulation and sloped roofs to reduce snow accumulation. • Desert homes generally have thick masonry walls and wide overhangs. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  15. A Southwestern Home • This home is designed to provide a comfortable atmosphere in a hot, arid climate. RedCedar Shingle and Handsplit Shake Bureau Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  16. A South Florida Home • This south Florida home is particularly suited to a warm, moist climate. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  17. Availability • Availability of desirable housing in a given area is often limited. • Population shifts do not always coincide with construction patterns. • Availability is often the determining factor in acquiring housing. • Some types of housing offer mobility (motor homes and mobile homes). Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  18. Housing Availability • Apartments help accommodate high demand for available housing in a given area. Norandex/Reynolds Building Products Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  19. Cost • Cost is a crucial factor in housing choices for almost everyone. • Cost becomes more important as construction prices rise. • Home repairs, taxes, and insurance costs must be considered as well. • Total housing costs reduce affordable choices to the average person. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  20. Taste • Taste is the sense of what is fitting, harmonious, or beautiful. • Taste preferences change throughout a person’s life. • One aspect of good taste in design is function. • Design that follows personal taste is likely to be pleasing. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  21. Taste in Design • The pleasing design of this home reflects the personal taste of its occupants. Georgia Pacific Corporation Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  22. Lifestyle • A household’s lifestyle is related to the values, social status, and activities of its members. • Lifestyle dictates how a home is used, such as for a • place to sleep • bustling center of activities and hobbies • peaceful retreat • site for social gatherings (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  23. Lifestyle • A truly functional lifespace is a logical extension of a household’s lifestyle. • The interior space is described as: • individual space • group space • support space • Homes need all three types, but the amount of each varies with lifestyle. (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  24. Lifestyle • Space should be provided for individual and group activities. • Individual space allows sleeping, dressing, studying, relaxing, and having privacy. • Group space allows family dining, recreation, and conversation. • Support space is needed for preparing food, doing laundry and other tasks, and storing items. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  25. Individual Space • This individual space is for a younger member of the household. Manufactured Housing Institute Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  26. Group Space • Group space is necessary for the interaction of two or more people. Drexel Heritage Furnishings, Inc. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  27. Support Space • The kitchen is a good example of support space in the home. Wilsonart Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  28. Types of Housing Available • Tract houses • Custom houses • Manufactured houses • Mobile homes • Multifamily dwellings (cooperatives, condominiums, and rental apartments) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  29. Tract Houses • Tract houses are built by a developer using just a few basic plans. This reduces costs and speeds the work. • Tract houses have several advantages: • The buyer can see the final product. • A firm price can usually be negotiated. • Costs are often less than a custom home. (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  30. Tract Houses • Tract houses also have some disadvantages: • They may be monotonous and have little individuality. • They often look bare and unfinished for a few years until trees and shrubs grow. • Lot sizes are generally small. • The buyer takes a risk, not knowing how successful the development will be. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  31. Custom Houses • The distinguishing feature of custom houses is they are designed and built for a specific household. • They are different from all other houses. • A custom house costs more per square foot than other types of housing. • They are generally tailored to specific building sites. (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  32. An Architect-Designed House • This custom house is compatible with the site, local climate, and the occupants’ lifestyle. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  33. Custom Houses • A custom house is the dream of most people. • Plans may be designed by an architect or purchased from a publisher and modified to meet family needs. • Designing a functional home requires special skills. (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  34. A Stock Plan • A stock plan can be modified to meet the needs of a prospective homeowner. Kingsberry Homes Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  35. Custom Houses • Individuals should assess their skills before attempting to design and build a home. • Homeowners should not need to alter activities to fit their custom houses. • The site is an integral part of the whole and should complement the finished structure. (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  36. A Complementary Site • This custom house is well suited to its beach location. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  37. Custom Houses • The advantages of designing a custom house include: • an exhilarating experience • savings in labor charges • the satisfaction of having a home built to personal specifications (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  38. Custom Houses • The disadvantages of designing and building a custom house include: • a process that is very complicated • a need for much patience and hard work • difficulty in getting a loan for an owner-built house • codes that may require a licensed contractor to perform certain tasks Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  39. Manufactured Houses • Manufactured houses are available in several forms and degrees of completion, including: • modular components • prefabs • kit houses • precuts (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  40. Manufactured Houses • Manufactured houses may include preassembled modular components such as: • roof panels • floor panels • wall sections • kitchens • baths (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  41. A House Being Manufactured • Standard modular components were used to assemble this manufactured house. Manufactured Housing Institute Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  42. Manufactured Houses • Some houses are almost complete when they leave the factory. • Others such as prefab houses are delivered as large panels ready for erection on the site. • Kit houses are also available for factory models. (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  43. A Factory-Built Module • A factory-built module is placed on the foundation with a large crane. Manufactured Housing Institute Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  44. Manufactured Houses • Today’s manufactured houses are well-constructed and incorporate good design. • Advantages include lower costs, reduced time in building, and higher quality. • Disadvantages include a limited selection and problems with large modules. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  45. A Precut Model • This home used factory precuts, which are packaged components cut to size for a plan. Photo courtesy of Lindal Cedar Homes, Inc., Seattle, WA Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  46. A Manufactured House • This manufactured house has the look of a custom house. Manufactured Housing Institute Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  47. Mobile Homes • Mobile homes, designed to be movable, are constructed on frames having wheels for towing. • Two or more units may be joined together. • A permanent or temporary foundation may be used. (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  48. A Mobile Home • Mobile homes make efficient use of space and generally are very economical. Manufactured Housing Institute Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  49. Mobile Homes • Advantages include economy, mobile-home park services, movability, and a “move-in” condition (with appliances, carpeting, and other amenities provided). • Disadvantages include rapid depreciation, social stigma, and high fees for moving, which can only be done by professionals. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  50. Cooperatives • A cooperativerefers to a type of ownership, not a type of building. • The management is run as a corporation. • Buyers purchase stock in the corporation, and as owners, determine how the coop is run. (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.