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  1. PowerPoint Presentation Textbook Cover PublisherThe Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.Tinley Park, Illinois Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  2. Chapter 7 • Color Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  3. Chapter 7 Overview • Introduction • The Psychology of Color • The Color Spectrum • The color wheel • Color Characteristics • Warm and cool colors • Neutral colors (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  4. Chapter 7 Overview • Color Systems • The Brewster system • The Ostwald system • The Munsell system • Color Harmonies • Effect of light on color • Effect of adjacent colors (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  5. Chapter 7 Overview • Color Harmonies (Continued) • Effect of texture on color • Effect of color on space • Color Decisions Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  6. Objectives • Explain the perceptions linked to certain colors. • Describe the standard color wheel. • Evaluate a color according to hue, value, and intensity. • Use a color wheel to plan various color harmonies. (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  7. Objectives • Describe three popular color systems. • Identify seven common color harmonies. • Explain the effect of light on color. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  8. Introduction • Color: • is the most exciting tool of the designer. • offers unlimited opportunities for decorating. • can help to create a mood within a room. • can communicate a wide range of emotions and feelings. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  9. Using Color in Design • Color brings this room to life. Century Furniture Company Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  10. The Psychology of Color • Color influences human behavior. • Research shows that certain perceptions are linked to certain colors. • Color perceptions affect the way people feel about: • space • rooms • objects Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  11. Red • Red: • is associated with danger, power, love, passion, anger, fire, and strength. • is bold, exciting, and warm. • stimulates the nervous system and increases blood pressure, respiration rate, and heartbeat. • is conspicuous wherever it appears and should be used with care. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  12. Using Color in Design • Red provides the excitement in this color harmony. Hickory Chair Company Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  13. Orange • Orange: • is cheerful, warm, and less aggressive than red. • expresses friendliness, courage, hospitality, energy, and hope. • has stimulating properties similar to red, but not as intense. • mixes well with cool colors. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  14. Using Color in Design • The orange seat on this Chippendale chair complements its natural wood tone. Hickory Chair Company Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  15. Yellow • Yellow: • is cheerful, friendly, and warm. • is associated with happiness, sunlight, sympathy, prosperity, cowardice, and wisdom. • makes a room appear light and airy. • Pure yellows demand attention and should be used with care. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  16. Using Color in Design • This yellow bath is bright and cheerful. Manufactured Housing Institute Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  17. Green • Green: • is the color of nature. • is refreshing, cool, peaceful, and friendly. • is often associated with hope, envy, and good luck. • mixes well with other colors, especially white. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  18. Using Color in Design • Lush greenery and deep green side chairs create a serene setting for this living room. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  19. Blue • Blue: • has the opposite effect of red. • is cool, calm, and reserved. • communicates serenity, tranquility, and formality. • can be depressing if too much is used. • Lacquer, glass, and other shiny surfaces intensify blue. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  20. Using Color in Design • The blue sofa and chair seat increases the formality of the setting. Hickory Chair Company Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  21. Violet • Violet: • is the color of royalty, dignity, and mystery. • is dramatic and works well with other colors, especially pink and blue. • is often used in small amounts as an accent. • Popular violet hues include plum, eggplant, and lilac. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  22. Using Color in Design • Violet serves as the accent in this living room. Manufactured Housing Institute Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  23. Black • Black: • is mysterious, severe, and dramatic. • symbolizes wisdom, evil, and death. • helps other colors appear more vivid when used in small amounts. • should be used sparingly as it can be oppressive and claustrophobic, especially in large amounts. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  24. Using Color in Design • Black provides drama in this hallway. Summitville Tile Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  25. White • White: • is the symbol of youth, freshness, innocence, purity, faith, and peace. • can make other colors appear cleaner and livelier. • is used with traditional as well as modern styles. • Creamy white creates a mellow background color. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  26. Using Color in Design • White makes this space appear larger and helps blend the various elements together. Manufactured Housing Institute Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  27. Color Decisions • When making color decisions for a home, the color preferences of all family members should be considered. • Social areas should be decorated in colors that make all members feel comfortable. • Personal areas can be decorated using individual color preferences. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  28. The Color Spectrum • The color spectrum is the full range of all existing colors. • It is composed of more than 10 million identified colors. • This color array is found in the rainbow. • Each distinctive color is derived from a few basic colors. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  29. The Color Spectrum • This is one visual representation of the color spectrum. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  30. The Color Wheel • The color wheel is the most commonly used tool for understanding color relationships in design. • The middle ring of the color wheel consists of three types of colors: • primary colors • secondary colors • intermediate colors Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  31. The Color Wheel • The middle ring shows normal color values, while tints appear on the inside circle and shades appear outside. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  32. Primary Colors • The three primary colorsare: • yellow • blue • red • Mixing, lightening, and darkening the primary colors can make all other colors. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  33. Primary Colors • The primary colors are equally spaced around the color wheel. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  34. Secondary Colors • The three secondary colors are: • orange • violet • green • Mixing equal amounts of two primary colors makes these colors. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  35. Secondary Colors • Each secondary color is positioned between the two primary colors used to make it. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  36. Intermediate Colors • The six intermediate colors are: • yellow-green • blue-green • blue-violet • red-violet • red-orange • yellow-orange (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  37. Intermediate Colors • Intermediate colors are made by mixing one primary and one secondary color. • The primary color is always listed first. • Intermediate colors are also called tertiary colors. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  38. Intermediate Colors • Half the colors on the color wheel are intermediate colors. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  39. Color Characteristics • Each color has three characteristics: • Hue is the name of a color. • Value is the lightness or darkness of a hue. • Intensity is the brightness or dullness of a hue. • Red, green, and blue-violet are examples of hues. (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  40. Color Characteristics • The hue is the characteristic that makes red different from green. • The normal values of hues are shown in the middle ring of the color wheel. • Yellow is the lightest normal value of all hues on the color wheel, while violet has the darkest value. (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  41. Value Scale • The value of a color can be changed by adding different amounts of black or white. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  42. Color Characteristics • The value of a hue can be made lighter by adding white. • This produces a tint. • Example: Pink is a tint of red, made by adding white to red. • Tints are shown in the inner ring of the color wheel. (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  43. Color Characteristics • A hue can be made darker by adding black. • This produces a shade. • Example: Maroon is a shade of red, made by adding black to red. • Shades are shown in the outer ring of the color wheel. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  44. Color Characteristics • The complement of a hue is the color directly opposite it on a standard color wheel. • Example: Green is the complement of red. • A hue can be made duller or less intense by adding some of its complement. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  45. Warm and Cool Colors • Colors can be grouped as warm colors or cool colors. • Warm colors, also called advancing colors, are orange, yellow, and red. • Cool colors, also called receding colors, include green, blue, and violet. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  46. Warm and Cool Colors • Cool colors dominate the left room, while warm colors prevail on the right. Sauder Woodworking Company Shae Lubecke, ASID, Illinois Chapter Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  47. Neutral Colors • The neutral colors are: • white, which is totally absent of color • black, which is a mixture of all colors • gray, which is a combination of black and white • Brown, tan, and beige are considered near-neutral colors. Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  48. Neutral Colors • Neutral colors often serve as background colors because they blend well with others. Century Furniture Company Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  49. Color Systems • Several color systems or theories are recognized, each with a different group of basic colors. • Some color systems incorporate both psychological and physical factors. • The three most common systems are: • Brewster system • Ostwald system • Munsell system Permission granted to produce for educational use only.

  50. The Brewster System • The Brewster system is the standard color wheel, also called Prang system. • It is based on the primary hues (red, yellow, and blue), which cannot be mixed from other pigments. • There are 12 hues in the Brewster color wheel. (Continued) Permission granted to produce for educational use only.