the four noble truths the noble eightfold path l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
The Four Noble Truths The Noble Eightfold Path PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
The Four Noble Truths The Noble Eightfold Path

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 94

The Four Noble Truths The Noble Eightfold Path - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 674 Views
  • Uploaded on

The Four Noble Truths The Noble Eightfold Path. The Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta. The first discourse of the Buddha, to the Five Ascetics at the Isipatana Deer Park at Sarnath.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

The Four Noble Truths The Noble Eightfold Path


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. The Four Noble TruthsThe Noble Eightfold Path

    2. The Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta The first discourse of the Buddha, to the Five Ascetics at the Isipatana Deer Park at Sarnath. Dhamma – the Teachings of the Buddha, or the truths leading the way out of dukkha. Cakka – wheel. Pavattana – setting in motion. “Setting the Wheel of the Dhamma in Motion” discourse.

    3. The Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta The first discourse of the Buddha, to the Five Ascetics at the Isipatana Deer Park at Sarnath. Dhamma – the Teachings of the Buddha, or the truths leading the way out of dukkha. Cakka – wheel. Pavattana – setting in motion. “Setting the Wheel of the Dhamma in Motion” discourse.

    4. The Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta The first discourse of the Buddha, to the Five Ascetics at the Isipatana Deer Park at Sarnath. Dhamma – the Teachings of the Buddha, or the truths leading the way out of dukkha. Cakka – wheel. Pavattana – setting in motion. “Setting the Wheel of the Dhamma in Motion” discourse.

    5. The Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta The first discourse of the Buddha, to the Five Ascetics at the Isipatana Deer Park at Sarnath. Dhamma – the Teachings of the Buddha, or the truths leading the way out of dukkha. Cakka – wheel. Pavattana – setting in motion. “Setting the Wheel of the Dhamma in Motion” discourse.

    6. The Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta The first discourse of the Buddha, to the Five Ascetics at the Isipatana Deer Park at Sarnath. Dhamma – the Teachings of the Buddha, or the truths leading the way out of dukkha. Cakka – wheel. Pavattana – setting in motion. “Setting the Wheel of the Dhamma in Motion” discourse.

    7. The Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta The first discourse of the Buddha, to the Five Ascetics at the Isipatana Deer Park at Sarnath. Dhamma – the Teachings of the Buddha, or the truths leading the way out of dukkha. Cakka – wheel. Pavattana – setting in motion. “Setting the Wheel of the Dhamma in Motion” discourse.

    8. The Swastika Symbol The swastika is an equilateral cross with arms bent at right angles, all in the same direction, towards either the right or left. The swastika is a symbol of prosperity and good fortune and was widely found in ancient civilizations throughout the world in Asia, Europe and also South America.

    9. The Swastika Symbol The swastika is an equilateral cross with arms bent at right angles, all in the same direction, towards either the right or left. The swastika is a symbol of prosperity and good fortune and was widely found in ancient civilizations throughout the world in Asia, Europe and also South America.

    10. The Swastika Symbol It represented the sun, fire, or life in many ancient cultures although different religions used it to signify different meanings. In Buddhism, it denotes the Dhamma, universal harmony, the balance of opposites and spiritual attainment. The Nazis used it to denote the racial purity of the Aryan ‘master’ race which they thought themselves to be.

    11. The Swastika Symbol It represented the sun, fire, or life in many ancient cultures although different religions used it to signify different meanings. In Buddhism, it denotes the Dhamma, universal harmony, the balance of opposites and spiritual attainment. The Nazis used it to denote the racial purity of the Aryan ‘master’ race which they thought themselves to be.

    12. The Swastika Symbol It represented the sun, fire, or life in many ancient cultures although different religions used it to signify different meanings. In Buddhism, it denotes the Dhamma, universal harmony, the balance of opposites and spiritual attainment. The Nazis used it to denote the racial purity of the Aryan ‘master’ race which they thought themselves to be.

    13. The Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta The Buddha advised us to avoid the two extremes of Self-Mortification and Self-Indulgence. This is because these two extremes are base, ignoble and unprofitable. Instead, He advised us to follow the Middle Path between these two extremes, which lead to knowledge, vision, peace and Self-Awakening.

    14. The Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta The Buddha advised us to avoid the two extremes of Self-Mortification and Self-Indulgence. This is because these two extremes are base, ignoble and unprofitable. Instead, He advised us to follow the Middle Path between these two extremes, which lead to knowledge, vision, peace and Self-Awakening.

    15. The Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta Buddhism is thus also known as the “Middle Way”. The Buddha stated the Middle Way as the Noble Eightfold Path. He then identified the Four Noble Truths which is to be realized upon following the Noble Eightfold Path.

    16. The Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta Buddhism is thus also known as the “Middle Way”. The Buddha stated the Middle Way as the Noble Eightfold Path. He then identified the Four Noble Truths which is to be realized upon following the Noble Eightfold Path.

    17. The Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta Buddhism is thus also known as the “Middle Way”. The Buddha stated the Middle Way as the Noble Eightfold Path. He then identified the Four Noble Truths which is to be realized upon following the Noble Eightfold Path.

    18. The Four Noble Truths All beings are subject to Dukkha.   Dukkha arises from desire and craving.   Dukkha can be overcome by the elimination of desire and craving.   There is a way out of dukkha,  which is the Noble Eightfold Path.

    19. The Four Noble Truths All beings are subject to Dukkha.   Dukkha arises from desire and craving.   Dukkha can be overcome by the elimination of desire and craving.   There is a way out of dukkha,  which is the Noble Eightfold Path.

    20. The Four Noble Truths All beings are subject to Dukkha.   Dukkha arises from desire and craving.   Dukkha can be overcome by the elimination of desire and craving.   There is a way out of dukkha,  which is the Noble Eightfold Path.

    21. The Four Noble Truths All beings are subject to Dukkha.   Dukkha arises from desire and craving.   Dukkha can be overcome by the elimination of desire and craving.   There is a way out of dukkha,  which is the Noble Eightfold Path.

    22. The Four Noble Truths All beings are subject to Dukkha.   Dukkha arises from desire and craving.   Dukkha can be overcome by the elimination of desire and craving.   There is a way out of dukkha,  which is the Noble Eightfold Path.

    23. The Four Noble Truths All beings are subject to Dukkha.   Dukkha is usually translated as suffering but it actually encompasses a wide range of negative feelings including stress, dissatisfaction and physical suffering.  Dukkha exists as all beings are subject to illness, separation from loved ones, not getting their desires, aging and death.    

    24. The Four Noble Truths All beings are subject to Dukkha.   Dukkha is usually translated as suffering but it actually encompasses a wide range of negative feelings including stress, dissatisfaction and physical suffering.  Dukkha exists as all beings are subject to illness, separation from loved ones, not getting their desires, aging and death.    

    25. The Four Noble Truths All beings are subject to Dukkha.   Dukkha is usually translated as suffering but it actually encompasses a wide range of negative feelings including stress, dissatisfaction and physical suffering.  Dukkha exists as all beings are subject to illness, separation from loved ones, not getting their desires, aging and death.    

    26. The Four Noble Truths Dukkha arises from desire and craving.   All beings crave pleasant sensations, and also desire to avoid unpleasant sensations.  These sensations can be physical or psychological, and dukkha arises when these desires and cravings are not met.

    27. The Four Noble Truths Dukkha arises from desire and craving.   All beings crave pleasant sensations, and also desire to avoid unpleasant sensations.  These sensations can be physical or psychological, and dukkha arises when these desires and cravings are not met.

    28. The Four Noble Truths Dukkha arises from desire and craving.   All beings crave pleasant sensations, and also desire to avoid unpleasant sensations.  These sensations can be physical or psychological, and dukkha arises when these desires and cravings are not met.

    29. The Four Noble Truths Dukkha can be overcome by the elimination of desire and craving.   Nibbana is the state of peace where all greed, hatred and delusion, and thereby dukkha, have been eradicated.  

    30. The Four Noble Truths Dukkha can be overcome by the elimination of desire and craving.   Nibbana is the state of peace where all greed, hatred and delusion, and thereby dukkha, have been eradicated.  

    31. The Four Noble Truths There is a way out of dukkha, which is the Noble Eightfold Path. Dukkha can be reduced, weakened and finally eradicated and Nibbana thereby attained, by following this path as taught by the Buddha.

    32. The Four Noble Truths There is a way out of dukkha, which is the Noble Eightfold Path. Dukkha can be reduced, weakened and finally eradicated and Nibbana thereby attained, by following this path as taught by the Buddha.

    33. The Four Noble Truths Buddhism is occasionally criticized as being overly pessimistic as it seems to focus on suffering rather than on happiness and joy.  However, all conditions of happiness and joy are impermanent because all beings are subject to sickness, old age and death, and as a result, all beings are undeniably subject to dukkha. 

    34. The Four Noble Truths Buddhism is occasionally criticized as being overly pessimistic as it seems to focus on suffering rather than on happiness and joy.  However, all conditions of happiness and joy are impermanent because all beings are subject to sickness, old age and death, and as a result, all beings are undeniably subject to dukkha. 

    35. The Four Noble Truths Instead, Buddhism is actually realistic as the Buddha has taught us how to overcome or reduce dukkha, and how to achieve the permanent bliss of Nibbana.  By following the Noble Eightfold Path taught by the Buddha, Nibbana can be experienced even in this present lifetime.

    36. The Four Noble Truths Instead, Buddhism is actually realistic as the Buddha has taught us how to overcome or reduce dukkha, and how to achieve the permanent bliss of Nibbana.  By following the Noble Eightfold Path taught by the Buddha, Nibbana can be experienced even in this present lifetime.

    37. Nibbana Without already practicing Buddhism and being on the path laid down by the Buddha, Nibbana can be a difficult concept to grasp or understand.  It is like trying to explain colours to the blind, or sound to the deaf.  Conventional language cannot adequately describe Nibbana.  It has to be experienced to be understood.  

    38. Nibbana Without already practicing Buddhism and being on the path laid down by the Buddha, Nibbana can be a difficult concept to grasp or understand.  It is like trying to explain colours to the blind, or sound to the deaf.  Conventional language cannot adequately describe Nibbana.  It has to be experienced to be understood.   

    39. Nibbana However, in short, Nibbana is the total absence of all craving and suffering. It is achieved by one who has eradicated all aspects of greed, hatred and delusion.  It is a state of permanent bliss and happiness from which there is no more rebirth.  

    40. Nibbana However, in short, Nibbana is the total absence of all craving and suffering. It is achieved by one who has eradicated all aspects of greed, hatred and delusion.  It is a state of permanent bliss and happiness from which there is no more rebirth.  

    41. Nibbana However, in short, Nibbana is the total absence of all craving and suffering. It is achieved by one who has eradicated all aspects of greed, hatred and delusion.  It is a state of permanent bliss and happiness from which there is no more rebirth.  

    42. The Noble Eightfold Path Right Speech Right Action Right Livelihood Right Effort Right Mindfulness Right Concentration Right Understanding Right Thought

    43. The Noble Eightfold Path Right Speech Right Action Right Livelihood Right Effort Right Mindfulness Right Concentration Right Understanding Right Thought