lecture 8 conformity l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
LECTURE 8 Conformity PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
LECTURE 8 Conformity

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 45

LECTURE 8 Conformity - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 329 Views
  • Uploaded on

LECTURE 8 Conformity Administration Chameleon Effect Sherif’s Autokinetic Effect Study Asche’s Conformity Studies Milgram’s Obedience Studies Zimbardo’s Stanford Prison Study Break Video on Conformity Resisting Conformity Next Class Questions? Conformity

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'LECTURE 8 Conformity' - Rita


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
lecture 8 conformity
LECTURE 8 Conformity
  • Administration
  • Chameleon Effect
  • Sherif’s Autokinetic Effect Study
  • Asche’s Conformity Studies
  • Milgram’s Obedience Studies
  • Zimbardo’s Stanford Prison Study
  • Break
  • Video on Conformity
  • Resisting Conformity
  • Next Class
conformity
Conformity
  • Definition: A change in behaviour or beliefs due to the real or imagined influence of other people.
  • Social Norms: The implicit or explicit rules a group has for the acceptable behaviours, values, and beliefs of its members.
chameleon effect
Chameleon Effect
  • Definition: The nonconscious mimicry of the postures, mannerisms, and facial expressions of one’s interaction partner.
  • The mere perception of another’s behaviour can automatically increase the likelihood of engaging in that behaviour oneself.
chameleon effect6
Chameleon Effect

Chartrand and Bargh (1999)

informational social influence
Informational Social Influence
  • Conforming because we believe that others’ interpretation of an ambiguous situation is more correct than ours and will help us choose an appropriate course of action.
  • Acceptance: Conformity that involves both acting and believing in accord with social pressure.
  • We conform because we think this is the “right” way to act in this situation.
when do we conform to informational social influence
When do we conform to informational social influence?
  • When the situation is ambiguous
    • Fire alarms
  • When there is a crisis
  • When others are experts
normative social influence
Normative Social Influence
  • Conforming in order to be liked and accepted or to fulfil others’ expectations (e.g., mimicry).
  • This type of conformity results in public compliance (but not necessarily private acceptance) of the group’s beliefs and behaviours.
  • Public Compliance: Conformity that involves publicly acting in accordance with social pressure while privately disagreeing.
compliance
Compliance
  • Conformity Definition: A change in behaviour or beliefs due to the real or imagined influence of other people.
  • Compliance Definition: Conformity that involves publicly acting in accord with social pressure while privately disagreeing.
  • Obedience: Conformity that is related to a direct order from other people.
milgram s 1963 obedience study
Milgram’s (1963) Obedience Study
  • “Teachers” believe they are delivering shocks to a “learner” (appear to be randomly assigned to the roles).
  • Every time the learner gets an answer wrong, he gets a shock that increases in intensity.
  • Strongly encouraged by the experimenter to continue, even when the “learner” protests.
milgram s 1963 obedience study27
Milgram’s (1963) Obedience Study

“Ouwwww, this really hurts!”

“This hurts!”

“I want to quit!”

Stopsresponding

Makesnoise

milgram s obedience study
Milgram’s Obedience Study
  • Normative social influence – “It is absolutely essential that you continue” (…I did commit to doing this study…what will he think of me if I mess up his study now…?)
  • Informational social influence – Because the situation is ambiguous/novel, we are unsure, and so we look to the expert (the experimenter) for advice.
obedience across studies

Obedience Across Studies

Percentage fully obedient

*

Experimental Version

milgram s obedience study31
Milgram’s Obedience Study

Explanations for why they obeyed:

  • In automatic pilot to the “obey experimenter” norm - mindlessness
  • Fast-pace doesn’t allow for much thought
  • Increased in small increments (like foot-in-the-door).
stanford prison study zimbardo 1971
Stanford Prison StudyZimbardo (1971)

Personality versus Situation

- Results of the Milgram Study

- Goals of the Stanford Prison Study

Whether the situation defined guards and prisoners brutality and behaviours or whether it was related to the personality of people who took on those roles?

Role

A set of norms that define how people in a given social position ought to behave.

stanford prison study zimbardo 197133
Stanford Prison StudyZimbardo (1971)
  • Zimbardo randomly assigned university students to role-play being either guards or prisoners.
  • Guards were given uniforms, whistles, and clubs and were told to enforce the rules.
  • Prisoners were given uniforms and locked in cells.
  • Although this study was originally planned for 2 weeks after only 6 days they had to stop the study because of the hostility of the prison guards and the mental and physical deterioration of the prisoners.
resisting social pressure
Resisting Social Pressure

Reactance (Brehm & Brehm, 1981)

An attempt to restore one’s sense of freedom.

Correction Theory (Wegener & Petty, 1997)

We correct for:

  • Direction of perceived influence
  • Extent of perceived influence

To correct we need:

  • Motivation and Ability
training and correction study kawakami dovidio van kamp 2002
Training and Correction StudyKawakami, Dovidio, & van Kamp (2002)

Female Stereotypes

  • Friendly
  • Submissive
  • Dependent
  • Caring

Male Stereotypes

  • Dominant
  • Independent
  • Ambitious
  • Competitive
slide36

NEW ASSOCIATION TRAINING

PHOTO

TRAIT

FEMALE STEREO

FEMALE

PHOTO

MALE STEREO

FEMALE STEREO

MALE

PHOTO

MALE STEREO

slide39
General Procedure
  • Nonstereotype Association Training
  • Job Ad, CV’s, and Cover Letters –

- 2 men and 2 women only identified by name

  • Choose Best Candidate
slide40
Conditions

Just Training – Possible Correction Processes

  • Nonstereotype Association Training
  • Job Ad, CV’s, and Cover Letters
  • Choose Best Candidate

Training + Filler Task – Reduce Motivation – No Correction

  • Nonstereotype Association Training
  • 10 Minute Break
  • Job Ad, CV’s, and Cover Letters
  • Choose Best Candidate

Training + Probe Task – Reduce Ability – No Correction

  • Nonstereotype Association Training
  • Job Ad , CV’s, and Cover Letters + Probe Reaction Task
  • Choose Best Candidate + Probe Reaction Task
next class
Next Class

Class 9: Wednesday, March 12th

Second In-class Exam

Class 10: Wednesday, March 19th

Group Influence

Reading material:

Chapter 8: Group Influence, pp. 239-275.