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Active Learning Strategies and Techniques. Nancy Allen, Ph.D. College of Education Qatar University. Workshop Objectives. By the end of this workshop, participants are expected to be able to: Investigate current research related to how people learn.

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Active Learning Strategies and Techniques


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    1. Active Learning Strategies and Techniques Nancy Allen, Ph.D. College of Education Qatar University

    2. Workshop Objectives By the end of this workshop, participants are expected to be able to: • Investigate current research related to how people learn. • Describe common learning styles and identify instructional methods consistent with each style. • Relate the theories of learning styles and active research. • Use these theories to modify and improve current teaching practices.

    3. Learning Styles

    4. Definition Learning style is simply the way a person prefers to process information.

    5. Some researchers currently identify three main learning styles: • auditory, • visual, and • kinesthetic/tactile • Other researchers identify more.

    6. The important thing to remember is: • We all have a mix of learning styles, and that we can develop areas that we currently do not frequently use.

    7. How do we get a “learning style”? • Learning styles are a result of a complex combination of heredity, experience, and opportunity. • There is no right or wrong learning style; however, schools have been designed for mostly auditory learners. • Students whose strengths are in other forms may have to learn to build on their current strengths while building others.

    8. Determining Personal Learning Style There are many print-based and online quizzes for determining personal learning style.

    9. What is your personal learning style?

    10. Kinesthetic Learners Can Benefit from: • Studying in short blocks. • Taking lab classes. • Role playing. • Taking field trips, visiting museums. • Studying with others. • Using memory games. • Using flash cards to memorize. (About.com, 2008).

    11. Learning Techniques for Visual Learners • Draw a map of events in history or draw scientific process. • Make outlines of everything! • Copy what’s on the board. • Ask the teacher to diagram. • Take notes, make lists. • Watch videos. • Color code words, research notes. • Outline reading. • Use flashcards. • Use highlighters, circle words, underline. (About.com, 2008).

    12. Auditory Learners Can Benefit from: • Using word association to remember facts and lines. • Recording lectures. • Watching videos. • Repeating facts with eyes closed. • Participating in group discussions. • Using audiotapes for language practice. • Taping notes after writing them. (About.com, 2008).

    13. Some educators recognize four learning styles rather than three. • Visual/ Verbal • Visual/ Nonverbal • Tactile/Kinesthetic • Auditory/ Verbal

    14. The Visual/ Verbal Learning Style • You learn best when information is presented visually and in a written language format. • In a classroom setting, you benefit from instructors who use the blackboard (or overhead projector) to list the essential points of a lecture, or who provide you with an outline to follow along with during lecture.

    15. The Visual/ Verbal Learning Style • You benefit from information obtained from textbooks and class notes. • You tend to like to study by yourself in a quiet room. • You often see information "in your mind's eye" when you are trying to remember something.

    16. Learning Strategies for the Visual/ Verbal Learner: • To aid recall, make use of "color coding" when studying new information in your textbook or notes. • Using highlighter pens, highlight different kinds of information in contrasting colors. • Write out sentences and phrases that summarize key information obtained from your textbook and lecture.

    17. Learning Strategies for the Visual/ Verbal Learner: • Make flashcards of vocabulary words and concepts that need to be memorized. • Use highlighter pens to emphasize key points on the cards. • Limit the amount of information per card so your mind can take a mental "picture" of the information.

    18. Visual/ Verbal • When learning information presented in diagrams or illustrations, write out explanations for the information. • When learning mathematical or technical information, write out in sentences and key phrases your understanding of the material. • When a problem involves a sequence of steps, write out in detail how to do each step.

    19. Visual/ Verbal • Make use of computer word processing. Copy key information from your notes and textbook into a computer. Use the print-outs for visual review. • Before an exam, make yourself visual reminders of information that must be memorized. Make "stick it" notes containing key words and concepts and place them in highly visible places --on your mirror, notebook, car dashboard, etc..

    20. The Visual/ Nonverbal Learning Style • You learn best when information is presented visually and in a picture or design format. • In a classroom setting, you benefit from instructors who use visual aids such as film, video, maps and charts. • You benefit from information obtained from the pictures and diagrams in textbooks. • You tend to like to work in a quiet room and may not like to work in study groups. • When trying to remember something, you can often visualize a picture of it in your mind. • You may have an artistic side that enjoys activities having to do with visual art and design.

    21. The Visual/ Nonverbal Learning Style • You learn best when information is presented visually and in a picture or design format. • In a classroom setting, you benefit from instructors who use visual aids such as film, video, maps and charts. • You benefit from information obtained from the pictures and diagrams in textbooks.

    22. Learning Strategies for the Visual/ Nonverbal Learner: • Limit the amount of information per card, so your mind can take a mental "picture' of the information. • Mark up the margins of your textbook with key words, symbols, and diagrams that help you remember the text. • Use highlighter pens of contrasting colors to "color code" the information.

    23. Learning Strategies for the Visual/ Nonverbal Learner: • Use the computer to assist in organizing material that needs to be memorized. • Using word processing, create tables and charts with graphics that help you to understand and retain course material. • Use spreadsheet and database software to further organize material that needs to be learned. • As much as possible, translate words and ideas into symbols, pictures, and diagrams.

    24. Learning Strategies for the Visual/ Nonverbal Learner: • When learning mathematical or technical information, make charts to organize the information. • When a mathematical problem involves a sequence of steps, draw a series of boxes, each containing the appropriate bit of information in sequence. • Use large square graph paper to assist in creating charts and diagrams that illustrate key concepts.

    25. The Tactile/ Kinesthetic Learning Style • You learn best when physically engaged in a "hands on" activity. In the classroom. • You benefit from a lab setting where you can man ipulate materials to learn new information. • You learn best when you can be physically active in the learning environment. • You benefit from instructors who encourage in-class demonstrations, "hands on" student learning experiences, and field work outside t he classroom.

    26. Strategies for the Tactile/ Kinesthetic Learner: • To help you stay focused on class lecture, sit near the front of the room and take notes throughout the class period. • Don't worry about correct spelling or writing in complete sentences. Jot down key words and draw pictures or make charts to help you remember the information you are hearing. • When studying, walk back and forth with textbook, notes, or flashcards in hand and read the information out loud. • Think of ways to make your learning tangible, i.e. something you can put your hands on. For example, make a model that illustrates a key concept.

    27. Strategies for the Tactile/ Kinesthetic Learner: • Spend extra time in a lab setting to learn an important procedure. • Spend time in the field (e.g. a museum, hi storical site, or job site) to gain first-hand experience of your subject matter. • To learn a sequence of steps, make 3'x 5' flashcards for each step. • Arrange the cards on a table top to represent the correct sequence. • Put words, symbols, or pictures on your flashcards -- anything that helps you remember the information.

    28. Strategies for the Tactile/ Kinesthetic Learner: • Limit the amount of information per card to aid recall. Practice putting the cards in order until the sequence becomes automatic. • When reviewing new information, copy key points onto a • Make use of the computer to reinforce learning through the sense of touch.

    29. Strategies for the Tactile/ Kinesthetic Learner: • Using word processing software, copy essential information from your notes and textbook. • Use graphics, tables, and spreadsheets to further organize material that must be learned. • Listen to audio tapes on a Walkman tape player while exercising. Make your own tapes containing important course information.

    30. The Auditory/ Verbal Learning Style • You learn best when information is presented auditory in an oral language format. • In a classroom setting, you benefit from listening to lecture and participating in group discussions. • You also benefit from obtaining information from audio tape. • When trying to remember something, you can often "hear" the way someone told you the information, or the way you previously repeated it out loud. • You learn best when interacting with others in a listening/speaking exchange.

    31. Strategies for the Auditory/ Verbal Learner: • Join a study group to assist you in learning course material. Or, work with a "study buddy" on an ongoing basis to review key information and prepare for exams. • When studying by yourself, talk out loud to aid recall. • Get yourself in a room where you won't be bothering anyone and read your notes and textbook out loud.

    32. Strategies for the Auditory/ Verbal Learner: • Tape record your lectures. • When learning mathematical or technical information, "talk your way" through the new information.

    33. Strategies for the Auditory/ Verbal Learner: • State the problem in your own words. • Reason through solutions to problems by talking out loud to yourself or with a study partner. • To learn a sequence of steps, write them out in sentence form and read them out loud (Miller, S., 2000).

    34. The more we know about our personal strengths, the more we can use these strengths to learn.

    35. We are all different, but we can all learn.

    36. We may have different “intelligences,” but we are all intelligent.

    37. The important point to remember is that if we choose ways to study that are best for us, we may improve our study and learning habits.

    38. What does it mean “to learn”? • Think • Write • Share • Compromise Discussion Think, Pair, Share

    39. Learning PairsCognitive processing: build knowledge, comprehension • Quick discussion or lengthy tasks. • From low level cognitive processing (comprehension) to higher level processing (problem solving). • Input and output vary for each situation, but the process always requires that learners work in pairs

    40. Assumptions About Learning

    41. We can “give” students knowledge.

    42. If we teach it, they will learn.

    43. Assumptions About Learning • People easily transfer learning from one situation to another if they have learned the fundamental skills and concepts. • Learners are "receivers" of knowledge in verbal forms from books, experts and teachers. • Learning is entirely behaviorist, involving the strengthening of bonds between stimuli and correct responses. • Learners are blank slates ready to be written on and filled with knowledge. • Skills and knowledge are best acquired independent of realistic contexts for use.

    44. Brainstorming • Define the problem • Keep the session focused • No criticism • Include everyone • Have fun • Make connections between ideas • Take notes

    45. How do people learn?

    46. When there were no schools, how did people learn? Where there are no schools, how do people learn?

    47. Resources • National Research Council (2000). How People Learn. • Jensen, E. (2005). Teaching with the Brain in Mind, 2nd Ed.

    48. Knowledge Overload • Human knowledge is currently doubling every 6 months.* • We can’t teach it all. *William J. Clinton.Remarks by the President to the National Association of Attorneys General. March 12, 1998. (retrieved 23 Dec. 2004).

    49. A new definition of knowledge… • …the meaning of “knowing has shifted from being able to remember and repeat information to being able to find and use it.” (Herbert Simon, Nobel laureate, 1996)

    50. What Current Research Says • Key findings were drawn from cognitive theory– about how people think, brain physiology – how the brain in made and works, and educational research – how students change in regard to classroom practice.