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Renaissance Thinking

Renaissance Thinking

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Renaissance Thinking

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  1. Renaissance Thinking

  2. (20) Interjections Hey! Yeah! Wow!

  3. Objectives (20) Interjections Students will: -Learn the function of interjections -Use interjections appropriately in speaking -Identify interjections and their function in particular sentences

  4. Synopsis (20) Interjections In today’s Walking Classroom lesson, we will learn about the meaning of and purpose for using interjections. An interjection is a word or phrase that shows emotion or excitement, usually at the beginning of a sentence. For example, in the sentence, “Wow! We’re outside!” Wow! is the interjection, and is followed by an exclamation point. Sentences can take on entirely different meanings just by changing the interjection you use.

  5. Vocab (20) Interjections • interjection (noun) an interruption of what someone is saying to add extra information or detail. • When you mentioned rocks, my interjection explained the three kinds of rocks. • interjection (noun) in grammar, a word that shows emotion or excitement, usually at the beginning of a sentence. One of the eight parts of speech. • The interjection “Wow!” showed the boy’s surprise and delight when he said, “Wow! I got a 100 on my spelling test!”

  6. Recap (20) Interjections • An interjection (the grammar kind) is a word or phrase that shows emotion or excitement, and interjections are often at the beginning of a sentence. • When you write a sentence with an interjection, the interjection word is set apart from the sentence by an exclamation point or a comma, depending on the level of feeling. • The same sentence can taking on really different meanings just by changing the interjection you use. • Not all interjections are polite; be careful in the interjections you choose.

  7. (21) Prepositions through over before after

  8. Objectives (21) Prepositions Students will: -Identify the most commonly used prepositions -Understand how to identify a preposition and how its use enhances a sentence -Understand that prepositions answer the questions of when, where and how

  9. Synopsis (21) Prepositions Today’s Walking Classroom podcast talks about the effective use of prepositions and prepositional phrases. A preposition is a word that shows the relationship between other words in a sentence. For example, in the sentence: The bunny sat on the box, “on the box” is the prepositional phrase that tells where the bunny sat. Prepositional phrases add information to a basic sentence but are not required to make a sentence complete. Most prepositions describe where, when, or how.

  10. Vocab (21) Prepositions modify (verb): to change; to make more clear She wanted to modify her statement by adding that she would be eating at the deli. precise (adjective): definite or exact Prepositional phrases help to make our sentences more precise.

  11. Recap (21) Prepositions • Prepositions are words that show the relationship between other words in a sentence. • Prepositions always begin prepositional phrases. Prepositional phrases give added information to a basic sentence, but they are not required to make a sentence complete. • Most prepositions describe where, when, or how. There are about 25 main prepositions.

  12. (22) Riddles from The Hobbit I’m tall when I’m young and I’m short when I’m old… Answer A candle

  13. Objectives (22) Riddles from The Hobbit Students will: -Identify the key components of a riddle -Understand the ways that symbolism is used in riddles -Understand how to decode riddles by working out clues that build upon one another

  14. Synopsis (22) Riddles from The Hobbit Today’s Walking Classroom lesson talks about the use of riddles in the novel, The Hobbit, by J.R.R. Tolkien. In a riddle, each line gives you a clue, and you have to piece the clues together like a detective to figure out the answer. Sometimes riddles use words and phrases that mean something other than what you think they mean when you first hear them, and you really have to think about the words.

  15. Vocab (22) Riddles from The Hobbit Hobbits (noun): a fictional race of little people, about four feet tall, with big hairy feet who live in cozy Hobbit holes in the sides of hills, created by author J.R.R. Tolkien The Hobbitsare a gentle, peaceful people who like to garden and make up songs. literally (adverb): word for word The boy took the meaning of the poem literallyand missed much of the symbolism. chain mail (noun): armor soldiers used to wear in battle in medieval times The knight wore chain mail to protect him from his enemy’s sword.

  16. Recap (22) Riddles from The Hobbit • In a riddle, each line gives you a clue, and you have to piece the clues together like a detective to figure out the answer. • Sometimes riddles use words and phrases that mean something other than what you think they mean when you first hear them. Like poems, riddles are often full of symbolism. • Experienced writers are able to play with language in creative and innovative ways.

  17. (23) Johannes Gutenberg

  18. Objectives (23) Johannes Gutenberg Students will: -Describe the process that Gutenberg went through to develop the printing press -Compare how life was before and after the invention of the printing press -Identify the impact that Gutenberg and the printing press had on the world

  19. Synopsis (23) Johannes Gutenberg In today’s Walking Classroom podcast, the kids and Mrs. Fenn focus on Johannes Gutenberg and his invention of the printing press in the early 1400s. Before Gutenberg’s invention, most books were copied by hand, few books existed, and few people learned how to read. The invention of the printing press changed the world as information and ideas could be learned and shared quickly and easily.

  20. Vocab (23) Johannes Gutenberg manuscript (noun) something written by hand rather than typed or printed My manuscript took me four hours to write. scribe (noun) a person who copies documents, especially by hand The scribe worked for days and days writing down the king’s speech.

  21. Recap(23) Johannes Gutenberg • Gutenberg realized the effect that creating a printing press could have on society, and he relentlessly pursued his dream of developing it for over 30 years. • Before the invention of the printing press, most books were copies by hand, few books existed, and few people learned how to read. • The invention of the printing press changed the world as information and ideas could be learned and shared quickly and easily.

  22. (24) Galileo Galilei

  23. Objectives (24) Galileo Galilei Students will: -Discover who Galileo was and explore the time period in which he lived -Analyze the events leading up to Galileo’s meeting with the Pope in 1633 -Evaluate the affect Galileo’s scientific methods, inventions, and beliefs had on other scientists and later inventions

  24. Synopsis (24) Galileo Galilei Today’s podcast focuses on Galileo Galilei, a courageous man from Italy who challenged accepted ideas. During the early 1600s, the time when Galileo lived, most people believed that the Earth was the center of the universe, but Galileo’s research led him to believe that the sun was the center of our universe – a belief that was true, but got him in a lot of trouble . Galileo’s use of accurate experiments that could be repeated and proven by someone else was an important contribution to scientific investigation.

  25. Vocab (24) Galileo Galilei • astronomer (noun): a scientific observer of stars, planets, and other objects found in space. • Many astronomers came to the conclusion that Pluto was no longer a major planet. • wrangler (noun): someone who loves to argue, debate and disagree • Wranglers can make effective lawyers. • renewed (verb): to make effective for an additional time period • The company was pleased with his work and renewedhis contract.

  26. Recap (24) Galileo Galilei • Most people during Galileo’s time believed that the earth was the center of the universe. • Galileo’s use of accurate experiments that could be repeated by someone else was an important contribution to scientific investigation. • New scientific evidence has not always been welcomed or accepted by the scientific community.

  27. (25) Renaissance Artists

  28. Objectives (25) Renaissance Artists Students will: -Identify characteristics of Renaissance art and examples of influential artists during that time period -Contrast the Renaissance period with preceding time periods and the Middle Ages -Describe the inventive techniques used by Italian Renaissance artists

  29. Synopsis (25) Renaissance Artists Today’s Walking Classroom lesson talks about the historical significance of the Renaissance period and the artists who energized the creative world in Europe. The Renaissance was a bright period for art and culture that lasted from the 1300’s to the 1600’s and started in Italy and then spread to other parts of Europe. Renaissance means rebirth and renewal, and citizens of that time welcomed a renewed sense of learning, knowledge, and cultural growth after a dark period that included the Black Death.

  30. Vocab (25) Renaissance Artists renaissance (noun): period of rebirth and renewal, especially in art I went through a real personal renaissance that helped me learn and grow. technique (noun): skill or ability; method or way of doing something His advanced techniques required a lot of skill and talent to execute. patronage (noun): support; in this case, financial support provided to artists The artist appreciated all the patronage he received from wealthy supporters.

  31. Recap (25) Renaissance Artists • The Renaissance was a bright period for art and culture that lasted from the 1300-1600’s, and started in Italy. It then spread to other parts of Europe. • Citizens of that time welcomed a renewed sense of learning, knowledge, and cultural growth after a dark period that included the Black Death. • Some of the most famous artists during that time included Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, who created works like the Mona Lisa and the Sistine Chapel ceiling fresco.

  32. (26) Leonardo da Vinci

  33. Objectives (26) Leonardo da Vinci Students will: -Identify da Vinci’s best known masterpieces and inventions -Describe the qualities that made da Vinci’s work style so memorable and influential -Understand how da Vinci’s many accomplishments contributed to the Renaissance era

  34. Synopsis (26) Leonardo da Vinci Today’s Walking Classroom podcast focuses on Leonardo da Vinci, a famous Italian inventor and artist who lived during the Renaissance. Da Vinci is well known for paintings like the Mona Lisa and the Last Supper, although he also spent much of his time on other types of creations and inventions. His many interests went beyond painting and included anatomy, architecture, and engineering.

  35. Vocab (26) Leonardo da Vinci • renaissance (noun): period of rebirth and renewal, especially in art and culture • He was a true Renaissance man – always learning about all sorts of new topics. • apprentice (noun): someone who works as assistant to learn from an experienced master • My medical training allowed me to serve as an apprentice to established doctors. • innate (adjective): natural, present at birth • He had an innate talent for playing the violin.

  36. Recap (26) Leonardo da Vinci • Leonardo da Vinci became one of the stars of the Italian Renaissance after he began studying art in Florence in the 1400’s. • His many interests went beyond painting to include anatomy, architecture, and engineering – but they all helped him to represent the human form in different ways. • Da Vinci is well known for paintings like the Mona Lisa and the Last Supper – although he also spent much of his time on other types of creations and inventions.

  37. (27) Madrigals

  38. Objectives (27) Madrigals Students will: -Analyze the origin and development of the English madrigal -Describe the subject matter of English madrigals -Compare and contrast English madrigals to music styles of today

  39. Synopsis (27) Madrigals This Walking Classroom podcast talks about the beginning and development of the English madrigal in the late 1500’s. English madrigals started as translations of Italian songs and they developed into their own a capella secular style, which means the songs were sung without instruments and they were not religious songs. Madrigals covered a wide range of subjects, and there are still many groups that perform this type of music today.

  40. Vocab (27) Madrigals secular (adjective): not related to or connected with religion       Most folk songs are secular since they don’t discuss religion or religious subjects. a capella (adjective): music for voices only, no instruments are used Most madrigals were a capella, since they were written to be sung without instruments.

  41. Recap (27) Madrigals • English madrigals started as translations of Italian songs. They developed into their own style that was separate from the Italian songs. • Most madrigals were secular, not religious, and dealt with a wide range of subjects. • There are still many groups that perform this music today.

  42. (28) Benjamin Banneker

  43. Objectives (28) Benjamin Banneker Students will: -Identify the key contributions Benjamin Banneker made to society -Understand how observation and an inquisitive mind are the foundations of inventive processes -Understand the struggles Banneker overcame as a black male and the strides he took towards racial equality

  44. Synopsis (28) Benjamin Banneker Today’s Walking Classroom podcast focuses on the famous inventor, scientist, astronomer, and writer, Benjamin Banneker. Banneker was curious about the ways things worked and was very inventive. The kids discuss the challenges that he faced as a black man in the 1700’s, but because of his perseverance, he made many contributions to science and literature. Through experimentation and observation, he collected enough data to publish six almanacs. He also helped plan the city of Washington D.C!

  45. Vocab (28) Benjamin Banneker almanac (noun): an annual publication containing a calendar of natural occurrences like the phases of the moon, sunrises and sunsets, and tides The farmer consulted the almanac before planting his fall crops. astronomy (noun): the scientific study of matter in outer space She was interested in the planets, stars, and anything else related to astronomy. integrated (adjective): including members of different races, religions or ethnic groups as equals Benjamin Banneker attended an integrated Quaker school.

  46. Recap (28) Benjamin Banneker • Banneker’s grandmother, Molly, had tremendous influence on him. At age seventeen, she came to America as an indentured servant. She eventually bought her own land and married a black slave, BannaKe, Benjamin’s grandfather. She taught Benjamin to read and write. • Banneker was curious about the ways things worked and very inventive. Through experimentation and observation, he collected enough data to publish six almanacs. • Banneker helped plan the city of Washington, D.C.

  47. (29) George Washington Carver

  48. Objectives (29) George Washington Carver Students will: -Identify the key ways that George Washington Carver changed farming practices for poor farmers -Explain how the health of soil impacts the health of the plants grown in it -Recognize that by following his passions for learning and plants, Carver changed the lives of many

  49. Synopsis (29) George Washington Carver This Walking Classroom lesson discusses the famous educator and scientist, George Washington Carver. Carver was a former slave with a passion for learning. He became a professor at the Tuskegee Institute and helped educate poor farmers about how to care for their soil so it would produce healthy crops year after year. Carver took an undesirable crop, peanuts, and through experimentation developed meaningful and desirable ways that it could be used. This discovery changed the lives of poor cotton farmers.

  50. Vocab (29) George Washington Carver agriculture (noun): the study of how plants, soil, and animals can be made more sustainable and productive Her knowledge of agriculture made her an excellent farmer. bumper crop (noun): an unusually large crop growth and harvest With just the right amount of rain and sunny weather, this year’s tomato farmers had a bumper crop. enrich (verb): to improve the quality of by adding desirable ingredients Carver enriched the lives of poor farmers by teaching them to enrich their soil.