slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
New Roles for Librarians: the Application of Library Science to Scientific/Technical Research -- Purdue University - a C PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
New Roles for Librarians: the Application of Library Science to Scientific/Technical Research -- Purdue University - a C

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 38

New Roles for Librarians: the Application of Library Science to Scientific/Technical Research -- Purdue University - a C - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 345 Views
  • Uploaded on

New Roles for Librarians: the Application of Library Science to Scientific/Technical Research -- Purdue University - a Case Study International Council for Science and Technology – ICSTI Ottawa, Ontario, Canada James L. Mullins, PhD Dean of Libraries & Professor Purdue University

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'New Roles for Librarians: the Application of Library Science to Scientific/Technical Research -- Purdue University - a C' - MikeCarlo


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

New Roles for Librarians: the Application of Library Science to Scientific/Technical Research -- Purdue University - a Case Study

International Council for Science and Technology –

ICSTI

Ottawa, Ontario,

Canada

James L. Mullins, PhD

Dean of Libraries &

Professor

Purdue University

June 9, 2009

slide2

e-Science

  • What is meant by e-Science?
  • E-Science is a complex interdisciplinary, data, and computationally-intensive, and often multi-institutional and many times international research process that is changing the methodology of science.
  • Such collaborative scientific enterprise requires access to large data collections, very large scale computing resources and high performance visualization back to the individual user scientists
  • Requires large scale storage, retrieval and transfer
what is data curation
What is Data Curation?
  • Archival Science - manage implies short term, archive implies long term preservation with control (dependent)
  • Library Science - organization, description, discovery, navigation and access are critical for identifying, finding, accessing, and using/re-using data
gregor mendel an example
Gregor Mendel – an example

James L. Mullins – Purdue University

slide7

Innovative Research Concepts

National Science Board.

Long-lived digital data collections:

Enabling research and education in the

21st century.

slide8

Innovative Research Concepts

  • Data Authors – benefit from their own work, broadly disseminated, safely archived.
  • Data Managers -- collaborates by insuring successful retention and dissemination through technical infrastructure
  • Data Scientists – conduct creative inquiry and analysis, enhance the research of data authors

National Science Board,

Long-lived digital data collections:

Enabling research and education in the

21st century, p. 27.

slide9

Innovative Research Concepts

Data Scientists:

… crucial to the successful

management of a digital data

collection – lie in having their

contributions fully recognized

National Science Board,

Long-lived digital data collections:

Enabling research and education in the

21st century, p. 27.

slide10

National Science Foundation Recognition of the Challenge for Data Curation

Dr. Christopher Greer

Former Program Director

Office of Cyberinfrastructure, NSF, USA

why curate manage research outputs
Why curate/manage research outputs?

Re-use of data for new research, including collection-based research to generate new science.

Retention of unique observational data which is impossible to re-create.

More data is available for research projects.

Compliance with legal requirements.

Ability to validate research results.

Use of data in teaching.

For the public good.

From: e-Science Curation Report. Data curation for e-Science in the UK: an audit to establish requirements for future curation and provision. Philip Lord and Alison Macdonald. 2003

slide12

Computational

& Information

Sciences

Cyber

Infra-

structure

Computer Science

Lib/Info Sciences

Archival Sciences

Conceptualization

by Chris Greer, NSF – 2007

Domain

Science

I-Center

slide13

Data Context

unpublishedresearchtraditional/non

“published”researchnon-traditional

secondarytertiaryresources

“published”data/datasets

publishedresearchtraditional

analyzeddata/datasets

The changing nature of research and scholarly communication in cyber enabled environments allows for discovery of and access to research of small research groups and unorganized, disparate and heterogeneous data further upstream than previously imagined…

processeddata/datasets

“raw”data/datasets

Modified from: Brandt, D.S. “Scholarly Communication” (in To Stand the Test of Time: Long-Term Stewardship of Digital Data Sets in Science and Engineering.: Final Report of Workshop New Collaborative Relationships: Academic Libraries in the Digital Data Universe. ARL, Washington, DC, September 2006.)

purdue university
Purdue University
  • Founded 1869 by gift from John Purdue
  • Premier programs: engineering; agriculture; hospitality and tourism; business; computer science; communications. Alumni include Neil Armstrong & Gene Cernan, first and last men on the moon.
  • 40,105 students 2008/2009, third largest international student enrollment in U.S. – 6,057 for 2008/09. Fall 2009 12% of first year undergraduate class will be international students, 60% graduate school international.
purdue university15
Purdue University

Nine Colleges: Agriculture, Consumer & Family Sciences, Education, Engineering, Liberal Arts, Management, Pharmacy/ Nursing/Health Sciences, Technology, Vet Medicine

73 Departments, several cross-disciplinary: e.g. Agricultural & Biological Engineering

interdisciplinary collaboration

DiscoveryPark

Interdisciplinary collaboration

Discovery Park: Eleven interdisciplinary centers designed to facilitate and promote leading edge research

Bindley Bioscience Center - Birck Nanotechnology Center

Burton D Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship

Center for Advanced Manufacturing

Center for the Environment - Cyber Center

Discovery Learning Center - E-Enterprise Center

Energy Center - Oncological Sciences Center

Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering

slide17

Purdue’s HUBzero

  • HUBzero™ allows creation of dynamic web sites that connect a community in scientific research and educational activities, e.g. nanoHUB (from: http://hubzero.org/)
  • 2009 – Google lists top 200 most trafficked university sites in the world on the web – Purdue ranked 6th.
slide18

Envisioning New Interdisciplinary Collaborations

Associate Dean for Research,

D. Scott Brandt,

Professor of Library Science

Facilitates individual and interdisciplinary research efforts of the fifty Libraries faculty

slide19

And remember Data Scientists?

Data Scientists:

… crucial to the successful

management of a digital data

collection – lie in having their

contributions fully recognized

National Science Board,

Long-lived digital data collections:

Enabling research and education in the

21st century, p. 27.

slide20

And remember Data Scientists?

Jacob (Jake) Carlson, appointed

Data Research Scientist Purdue Libraries

April, 2007

determine need for collaboration
Determine need for collaboration
  • Hypothesized that researchers have data management needs and that librarians can help meet them
  • Employed top-down and bottom-up investigation for data collection
  • Verified: PU researchers said they need help in collecting, organizing and providing access to their data
outside of the library
Outside of the library
  • Attended research seminars, call-outs, etc., to identify collaboration and funding opportunities
  • Built relationships - found researchers who understood that collecting, organizing and providing access to data and information are not only important, but critical
  • Found problems to solve, then collaborated on solutions
  • Talked about what we know—organizing data and information (different meanings to different groups)
  • Brought something to the table. Had to be prepared to demonstrate something tangible (initially a proof-of-concept or a prototype).
motivation library participants
Motivation (library participants)
  • Directly related to work, and makes something difficult easier
  • It’s an extension of “everyday job”
  • Something new and exciting to do
  • Breaking new ground, want to contribute to interdisciplinary initiative
  • Force the issue of how it gets done (i.e., more people added to help out)
motivation non participants
Motivation (non-participants)
  • Articulation of what is expected by the Dean
  • Partly determined on a case-by-case basis
  • Has to be “interesting to me”
  • Something that uses “the skills I can bring to it”
  • Need to get credit for it (recognition, reward)
  • Important to allow individual to define what interdisciplinary research is
  • Should be opportunities to "stick your toe in the water" before making big commitment
  • Need time to do it, and to do the “things I want to do”
purdue university libraries
Purdue University Libraries

Since 2004, initiative for Libraries faculty to collaborate with other faculty across campus—apply library science knowledge and expertise to research problems:

collect, organize, describe, curate, archive, disseminate data/information

past current areas of collaboration
Discovery Learning Center

Earth & Atmospheric Sciences

Economics

English

IT at Purdue

Mechanical Engineering Technology

Regenstrief Center

Graduate School

Oncological Sciences

Agricultural Economics

Agronomy

Biology

Cancer Center

Center for the Environment

Chemical Engineering

Chemistry

Civil Engineering

Cyber Center

Past & Current Areas of Collaboration
slide27

Distributed Data Curation Center – D2C2

    • Sustainability for data curation repositories
  • Ontological and taxonomic organization of disciplinary datasets
    • Metadata to facilitate access to data
      • collections
    • Data curation profiles for archiving and preserving datasets
    • http://d2c2.lib.purdue.edu/
d2c2 sponsored research 2008
D2C2 Sponsored Research 2008

Awarded—$618,383 (includes cont’ing)

INDURE—aggregating dissertation metadata (Indiana Economic Development Corporation), Witt

Enabling end-to-end geospatial data modeling workflows via INPort: The Isotope Networks Portal (NSF), Miller

Integrating Spatial Educational Experiences (ISEE) into Crop, Soil, and Environmental Science Curricula (USDA), Miller, M. Bracke

INTEROP: Developing Community-based DRought Information NetworkProtocols and Tools for Multidisciplinary Regional Scale Applications(DRInet) (NSF) Carlson

Pending (or in process for submission)

Nitrogen Science Network (Packard Foundation) M. Bracke, Witt

lisHUB: Investigating Community-based LIS Continuing Education in a Cyberinfrastructure-enabled Environment (IMLS) P. Bracke, et al

Object Reuse and Exchange for HUBZero (IMLS) Witt, et al

AfricaHUB (Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation) Nelson

Kollêma DataNet Project (NSF) Mullins, Carlson, Brandt

slide29

Grants(all Librariessince 2005)

2007 – 44 2008 – 57

d2c2 activities
D2C2 Activities

Lab in STEW G64

D-Space -> Fedora

Storage Resource Broker -> iRODS

Sun StorageTek 5800

Current Research Information Systems (e.g., INDURE) – SRU, Z39.50

HUB integration (OAI-PMH, Handle, ORE)

Metadata management and services

purdue e data task force
Purdue e-Data Task Force
  • Chartered by the Purdue Libraries Research Council
    • apply research from D2C2: what an institutional data repository service in context of Purdue Libraries
    • task force chartered: July 2008 to March 2009
    • three tasks:
      • complete a data repository prospectus
      • work with faculty and subject-specialist librarians in six different areas to ingest six different datasets into the current Purdue e-Data prototype
      • report findings and recommendations back to the Research Council
working group methodology
Working Group Methodology

interview faculty

selection & appraisal

create or enhance metadata

obtain and ingest dataset

determine and create appropriate points of access

policies: submission, use, and preservation

follow-up with faculty

examine role of librarians and the Libraries vis-à-vis an institutional data repository service

slide33

Ten Questions to Begin a Conversation With Faculty About Data Curation

What is the story of your data?

What form and format are the data in?

What is the expected lifespan of your data?

How could your data be used, reused, and repurposed?

How large is your dataset, and what is its rate of growth?

Who are potential audiences for your data?

Who owns the data?

Does the dataset include any sensitive information?

What publications or discoveries have resulted from the data?

How should the data be made accessible?

Witt, M. & Carlson, J. (2007). Conducting a data interview. http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/lib_research/81/.

examples
Examples

“Indiana Water Quality”

Group member = Chris Miller

Doctoral Student = Cristina Carbajo

Subject Librarian = Marianne Stowell Bracke

“Survey of Indiana Assistive Technology Professionals”

Group member = Jake Carlson

Faculty = Bart Bishop, Center for Assistive Technologies

Subject Librarian = Jane Kinkus

“Controversial Facilities in Japan”

Group member = Michael Witt

Faculty = Daniel Aldrich, political science

Subject Librarian = Bert Chapman

"Vehicle Signatures"

Group member = Mark Newton

Faculty = Darcy Bullock, civil engineering

Subject librarian = Megan Nelson

emerging issues include
Emerging issues include...

Reward structure, role of data in scholarly communication

Trust

Sustainability (both economic and technological)

Roles

Long-term preservation

Access (presenting data in an appropriate context)

Metadata (organization and description of data)

Persistence

Provenance

Ingest and scale

Intellectual property and permissions

Policies

slide38

Thank you!

Questions and Answers?

James L. Mullins – Purdue University

jmullins@purdue.edu