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2003 National Conference on Tobacco or Health Page 1. Assessing the Relative Impact of a Media Ad Campaign. Selina Carver Idaho Department of Health and Welfare. Michael Willmorth, Ph.D. Clearwater Research, Inc. December 11, 2003. Policy. Media. R & E.

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assessing the relative impact of a media ad campaign

2003 National Conference on Tobacco or Health Page 1

Assessing the Relative Impact of a Media Ad Campaign

Selina Carver

Idaho Department of Health

and Welfare

Michael Willmorth, Ph.D.

Clearwater Research, Inc.

December 11, 2003

background

Policy

Media

R & E

2003 National Conference on Tobacco or Health Page 2

Background
  • Idaho Tobacco Prevention and Control Program (ITPCP)
    • Bureau of Health Promotion, IDHW
    • Prevent initiation of tobacco use, eliminate exposure to ETS, promote quitting among youth and adults, and eliminate disparities in the population
  • es/drake (ESD)
  • Clearwater Research, Inc.
research history

2003 National Conference on Tobacco or Health Page 3

Research History
  • ITPCP’s targeted surveillance and evaluation efforts
    • Baseline survey of teens and parents in 2000
    • Anti-tobacco marketing survey of teens and parents in 2001
    • Counter-marketing media campaign evaluation surveys of teens in 2002 and 2003
2002 teen media ad campaign

2003 National Conference on Tobacco or Health Page 4

2002 Teen Media Ad Campaign
  • Targeted to teens (aged 12–17)
  • Messages
    • If you smoke, quit
    • Don’t start
  • Channels
    • Radio
    • Television
    • Billboards
  • Flights: September 2001–May 2002
2002 study objectives

2003 National Conference on Tobacco or Health Page 8

2002 Study Objectives
  • Measure the effectiveness of ITPCP media campaign based on campaign objectives and exposure.
  • Provide research-based conclusions that can guide message development and delivery to Idaho teens.
  • Evaluate impact of current media campaign on teen behavior.
2002 study design overview

2003 National Conference on Tobacco or Health Page 9

2002 Study Design Overview
  • Data collection
    • Telephone interview with 630 Idaho teens (12–17)
    • Field period: April 24–June 13, 2002
  • Sample
    • Probability sample (list-assisted RDD)
    • Stratified proportionately by media market
    • ±3.9% C.I. At 95% C.L. for entire state
    • Response rate: 49.0% CASRO, 63.9% upper bound
research questions

2003 National Conference on Tobacco or Health Page 10

Research Questions
  • What impact has the campaign had on the population of teenage smokers' propensity to quit or reduce smoking?
  • Has the campaign sparked conversation for the teenage population in Idaho?
  • How effective were particular ads in influencing smoking behavior? How convincing was each one? How sellable was the idea in each one?
  • What ads received by Idaho’s teenage population have been the most effective (whether or not a part of the ESD/ITPCP media ad campaign)?
  • What messages are the most beneficial for effecting change in smoking behavior? What works and what doesn’t?
  • What audience is most receptive to the current media ad campaign?
data collection methodology

2003 National Conference on Tobacco or Health Page 11

Data Collection Methodology
  • Telephone interviews
    • CATI
    • 10 minute interviews (on average)
  • Instrument design: screening questions
    • Determine eligibility of household
    • Obtain permission from parent/guardian to interview teen
    • Enumerate number of teens in household
    • Random selection of teen (with replacement as refusal avoidance)
questionnaire topics

2003 National Conference on Tobacco or Health Page 12

Questionnaire Topics
  • Demographics (including media use)
  • Social activities
  • Use of tobacco (self, family, friends)
  • Quit attempts
  • Tobacco-related beliefs (including ad-related messages)
  • Campaign and noncampaign ads (recall, awareness, effectiveness)
  • Conversations about tobacco/ads
recall frequency hearing ad

2003 National Conference on Tobacco or Health Page 13

Recall Frequency Hearing Ad
  • Over the past 12 months, how frequently have you heard a radio commercial or ad telling you about the risks of smoking and tobacco? Would you say …
    • Not at all
    • Less than once a month
    • 1 to 3 times a month
    • 1 to 3 times a week
    • Every day or almost every day
    • More than once a day
unaided recall

2003 National Conference on Tobacco or Health Page 14

Unaided Recall
  • Please describe one of the anti-tobacco radio ads you have heard over the past 12 months. (SELECT UP TO 3)
    • Facts
    • 5th Guy
    • Singing Pollution
    • Just a Pinch
    • Lucky Rick
    • Joe DeBoer
    • Critique
    • Look at Me
    • When You Smoke
    • OTHER (SPECIFY)
prompted recall

2003 National Conference on Tobacco or Health Page 15

Prompted Recall
  • Now, I will describe for you an ad that might or might not have been playing on the radio in your area. [READ DESCRIPTION] Over the past 12 months, how many times have you heard this ad? Would you say …
    • Not at all
    • Once
    • 2 to 4 times
    • 5 to 10 times
    • More than 10 times
  • Followed up with 3 agree/disagree assessments
    • Ad was convincing
    • Ad exaggerated the problem
    • Ad made me more aware of the risks of smoking and tobacco
coding data

2003 National Conference on Tobacco or Health Page 16

Coding Data
  • Interviewers coded open-ended responses into existing categories or recorded verbatim descriptions
  • New categories were created for “other” ads
    • Consultation with ESD
    • Internet searches
  • Analysts reviewed open-ended responses
    • Checked and corrected interviewer coding
    • Recoded “other” ads into new categories
  • New variables (“yes”/”no”)
    • Any ITPCP ad
    • Only ITPCP ads
    • No ITPCP ads
calculating impact

2003 National Conference on Tobacco or Health Page 20

Calculating “Impact”
  • “Impact” = percentage of unaided mentions accounted for by ITPCP ads
  • Lower bound = % only ITPCP ads / % any antitobacco ad
  • Upper bound = % any ITPCP ad / % any antitobacco ad
  • “Ballpark” point estimate = average of lower and upper bound
recommendations

2003 National Conference on Tobacco or Health Page 22

Recommendations
  • Use to quantify (in a “ballpark” way) how components of a media ad campaign fit into the larger system of antitobacco messages in which it operates
  • Limitations
    • Very restricted definition of “impact”
    • Relies completely on unaided recall, so interpretation is dependent on time of measurement
thanks

2003 National Conference on Tobacco or Health Page 23

Thanks!

Michael Willmorth, Ph.D.

Clearwater Research

Senior Study Director

2136 North Cole RoadBoise, ID 83704(208) 376-3376 1-800-727-5016

http://www.clearwater-research.com