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System Administration

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  1. Presented by: Chuck Sereboff and Laura Sereboff System Administration St. Petersburg Beach – October 2nd  October 6th

  2. GOALS The following goals define broad statements about the content and skill learning that will take place in this lesson plan. These simply stated goals will serve as “guideposts” as you approach the study of these lessons.   Upon completion of this plan, the student will develop competency in the following areas of CISCO System Administration. • CISCO requirements •   Maintenance     •    Third Party Products CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  3. CISCO REQUIREMENTS As the System Administrator, it is important to “know your system.” If you should encounter a problem, you should be able to determine what the problem is so that you can get the right help. • Hardware related • Operating System related • Application Software related In most cases, CISCO provided only the Application software so that is where we will start. CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  4. A successful installation requires the following: • A licensed copy of the necessary Third Party Products • Certain data files containing site specific information • A licensed copy of the object, or program files. • The execution of CISCOSYS.EXE CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  5. THE MAP When your CISCO programs were first installed, a “map” showing the location of the elements was was developed. It is important the System Manager be familiar with this map. We recommend this information be shared with at least one other responsible on-site person. CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  6. CISCO ELEMENTS ·E-911 Interface ·Paging Interface ·NCIC Interface ·ODBC Interface ·Mapping interface ·EMD Interface ·Mobile Interface ·Programs ·Data ·Runtime ·Configuration file ·Hazard Material Guides ·Help files ·Spooler files CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  7. Creating the “map” PROGRAM FILE LOCATION________________________ DATA FILE LOCATION____________________________ RUNTIME LOCATION_____________________________ CONFIGURATION FILE NAME_____________________ CONFIG FILE LOCATION__________________________ HAZARD GUIDE LOCATION_______________________ SPOOLER FILES LOCATION_______________________ HELPFILESLOCATION___________________________ CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  8. Map continued E-911 PROGRAMS LOCATION_______________________  PAGING PROGRAM S LOCATION____________________  NCIC/STATE PROGRAM LOCATION__________________  ODBC PROGRAM LOCATION________________________  MAPPING PROGRAMS LOCATION___________________  EMD PROGRAM LOCATION_________________________  MOBILE PROGRAM LOCATION______________________  SCRIPT OR BATCH FILES ___________________________ CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  9. Program Information CISCO programs are a collection of files that normally reside in their own directory. Depending on what products were purchased, when executed, you see choices in a menu fashion on your screen. CISCO’s programs have a specific naming convention. If you list the files in your program directory you will see file names such as: CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  10. Program naming convention XXXMENU = Menu Programs XXXMAINT = Maintenance Programs MNIINQRY = Master Name Index Syntax XXXINQRY = Inquiry Programs XXXPRT01 = Report Programs XXXHTM01 = Report Programs in HTML format XXX represents either the first three letters of a data file name or a specific module. CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  11. Programs must have shared properties. Some programs must be executable. Set proper permissions:  UNIX chmod 777 * The 777 sets permissions to read, write, and execute for all. Windows/NT attrib [filename] reveals the attributes of a file. Clear “r” by using ATTRIB. attrib –r [filename] It is also important to know that the directory in which the programs reside be read, write and shareable by all. So set them accordingly. CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  12. Data File Information Data files normally reside in their own directory. They too, have a specific naming convention and require the same levels of permissions as the program files. If you list the files in the data directory you would see file names such as: CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  13. AAADATA =Data Audit Trail ACCDATA =Accident Data ARRDATA =Arrest Data FILEA =Cad Call types, Units and parameters FILEB =Cad Active and Pending Calls FILEC =Cad Geo File CADCFS =Cad calls waiting to transfer Most data file names end in DATA with the exception of a few A-CAD data files listed above. CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  14. Controlling Data Files CONTDATA ROTDATA TABDATA SYSDATA MACDATA CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  15. Controlling Data Files CONTDATA is initially created by CISCO and sent to each customer. This file contains your Agency and User Identification information. ROTDATA is initially created by CISCO and sent to each customer. This is your serial number information and is keyed in conjunction with the CONTDATA file. TABDATA is initially created by CISCO and sent to each customer. This data file contains specific UCR/NIBRS codes as well as other sample code table entries. It is important that you refer to the CISCO user manual before changing or removing code tables from this file. SYSDATA is initially created by CISCO and sent to each customer. This file sets the computer environment in which the application will run. MACDATA is initially created by CISCO and sent to each customer. This data file contains the licensed number of users the agency has purchased. CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  16. CISCOSYS.EXE Required to print, run the spell checker, view photos or for other various executable programs to function, you must run CISCOSYS.EXE at each client. Must be Administrator Find and double click on CISCOSYS.EXE from the Client. Select all choices listed. This will create a C:\CISCO folder. Under the CISCO folder, a BIN, SPOOL,and HTML folder will be created. The BIN folder will contain a backup copy our executable programs. The SPOOL folder will permit the users to print or view reports. The HTML folder will permit users to print or view our enhanced reports. The program will put an entry in the registry and place the created folders in your path for execution. CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  17. MAINTENANCE CISCO programs require very little maintenance. Follow a regular schedule of maintenance to head off most situations before they become problems. Establish a “log” that is used to record your actions and results. This will be valuable in case you are not present. Be prepared! CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  18. Daily (estimate 15 minutes) Daily Backup Make sure that you have an ample supply of good quality tapes or CD’s (one tape or CD for every day of the week). Back up the data every day. Do a full system backup monthly. Verification The only way to know for sure is to do a restore. Don’t believe the backup software report! Remember, what good is the backup if it cannot be used when you need it. Record your backup in the log. CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  19. Weekly (estimate 15 minutes) Disk Maintenance Check and record disk usage. Use a log to record the results. Hint You will be able to plot these results and be able to visually see how you are doing and project when you might need to get more disk space. CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  20. Clean-up unnecessary files These include: Files that start with “SP” Files that contain “SOR” or “SRT” in their names Files with the “core” (UNIX only) Files that begin “vtmp” Check permissions – Data files need to be shareable CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  21. Monthly(estimate 45 minutes) Hardware Integrity Windows systems Re-boot the system to check the integrity of the hardware and reset the operating system. Run the VUTIL utility. Clear user counts to zero. Rebuild when there are many deleted records or are broken. Record your actions in the log. CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  22. Annually(estimate 60 minutes) Archive Old Information Consult the CISCO User Guide, General Information   Get ready for the New Year! Plan on resetting all of your numbers CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  23. The Configuration File The configuration file sets/defines variables, which enable the programs to execute. It contains the path to the programs and data, sets information for printers, and other necessary variables for CISCO to operate. A sample configuration file could contain the following entries: CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  24. Configuration - Printers C10 -P SPOOLER #courier 10 C10C -P SPOOLER #courier 10 compressed C12 -P SPOOLER #courier 12 C12C -P SPOOLER #courier 12 compressed The first series of letters must match an entry in the CISCO printer definitions file under system utilities. Additionally, the appropriate number must be inserted in the font box. An example follows: CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  25. Printer definition file CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  26. Configuration - Common V-VERSION 3 # VERSION 3 FILE SYSTEM FONT 1 # FONT SIZE MAX-FILES 128 # MAXIMUM FILES OPENED MAX-LOCKS 128 # MAXIMUM WINDOW_TITLE CISCO SOFTWARE # TITLE TO DISPLAY ON FILE_PREFIX=C:\CISCO\DATA #LOCATION OF DATA FILES CODE_PREFIX=C:\CISCO #LOCATION OF PROGRAM FILES CODE_SUFFIX= # INDICATES PROGRAMS WITHOUT SUFFIX PMS-REQ Y # PERMITS ALL PROPERTY TYPES QUIT-MODE –2 # DISALLOWS EXIT BY CLICKING ON X ICON C:\CISCO\CISCOL.ICO # LOATION OF THE CISCO ICON CISTHIN=N # USE OF THIN CLIENT Y or N CISHTML=C:\CISCO\HTML #LOCATION OF HTML REPORT FILES # CISHTML=NO HTML #DISALLOW HTML REPORT FILES CISSTART C:\CISCO # START IN LOCATION CISSPL C:\CISCO\SPOOL # LOCATION OF SPOOLER FILES CISHAZ C:\CISCO\HAZ #LOCATION OF HAZ MAT FILES CISMSG=C:\CISCO\SWITCH # MESSAGING FOLDER LOCATION CISCADOUT C:\CISCO\SWITCH\CADOUT # LOCATION OF CADOUT FILE CISCADIN C:\CISCO\SWITCH\CADIN # LOCATION OF CADIN FILE CISWRCNO Y # ALLOWS WRECKER ROTATION BY NUMBER CISCLR=C:\CISCO\DATA # SETS DAY & NIGHT COLORS FOR MOBILES CISHELP=C:\CISCO\DATA # LOCATION OF HELP FILES CIS_OPEN_OUT Y # SILENTLY CREATE NEW DATA FILES CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  27. Configuration / Interfaces CIS911=C:\CISCO\911\QUEUE LOCATION OF 911 QUEUE FILES An interface is simply an additional piece of software that enables two software applications to connect and “speak” to each other. If your agency has purchased optional interface software than you will be provided with specific information as to the setup and care of that application. Be sure to list your interface information on your “map” document. CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  28. RUNTIME FILES What is it? What if you were to travel the world? How would you communicate? Just think of how many languages you would have to speak. You might need an interpreter. Every Server is like a country. The O/S is the language it “speaks”.   Depending on what O/S the CISCO programs are installed, the Runtime acts as the interpreter allowing the program to “speak” to your computer. CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  29. VUTIL UTILITY • The standard database deployment is called “Vision” • We have a special utility called VUTIL that can be used to examine files and rebuild/reset corrupted indexes • All commands are executed from the command prompt CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  30. Options used with Vutil • -i“info” returns basic information about the data file. The command is:  • UNIX vutil –i [FILENAME] • Windows vutil32 –i [FILENAME] CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  31. - i flagexample vutil -i ARRDATA ARRDATA [vision version 3] # of records: 18 (Total number of records in file) # of deleted records: 1 (Total number of deleted records) file size: 11264 (Total number of bytes in file) record size: 1500 compressed(100%) # of keys: 11 (Total number of keys in file) user count: 2 (Total number of current users) CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  32. -check option • -check This option tests a data file for internal consistency. The command is: •  UNIX vutil –check *DATA • Windows vutil32 –check *DATA CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  33. -check example • CONTDATA: non-zero user count • CVSDATA: non-zero user count • CXRDATA: non-zero user count • EMLDATA: non-zero user count • EMQDATA: non-zero user count • FSCDATA: non-zero user count • HYDDATA: non-zero user count • HZWDATA: non-zero user count • LOGDATA: non-zero user count CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  34. -r option • The “rebuild” option is used to rebuild or recreate an indexed file. This option will need to be performed if you receive a 98 status on a data file. The command is: • UNIX vutil –r [FILENAME] • Windows vutil32 –r [FILENAME] CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  35. -r continued Note the number of records in the file when you begin! When a file is rebuilt, a temporary file is created and each record from the original file is written to it. Upon completion of a rebuild, you will be asked to replace original file with new one, to which you reply “Y” for yes or “N” for no. If the number of recovered records is less than the number you started with, STOP and call Support. CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  36. -r example C:\cisco\data:> vutil32 –r ARRDATA Input = ARRDATA, output = vd775r2, 91 records Rebuilding… .10%…20%...30%...40%...50%…60%…70%…80%…90%…100% 91 records recovered, 1 deleted records removed Replace original file with new one? Responding “Y” will re-index the file. “N” will not and leave the temporary file on the disk and the file remains broken. CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  37. -k example Special Rebuilds First, run VUTIL –i to determine the number of available keys Use only when the standard rebuild does not work! • UNIX vutil –r –k1 [FILENAME] • Windows vutil32 –r –k1 [FILENAME] CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  38. -k option Start with key 1. If this fails, move on to key 2, then on to key 3, until all keys have been attempted. If the rebuild fails, the data file is broken beyond repair. Restore from backup. If the rebuild is successful, remember to change the permissions of the data file for sharing (UNIX). CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  39. -z option This option resets the user count of each named file to zero.   A non-zero user count occurs when a data file is abnormally terminated. Examples would be terminal lock-ups, Windows locks or freezes, which requires killing a process or ending the current task, turning your computer off without logging out properly, temporary lost of power, etc. CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  40. -z example To set the user count to 0, you would type the following: •   UNIX vutil –zero [filename] • Windows vutil32 –zero [filename] CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  41. The CISCO Icon Let’s examine the CISCO icon properties. An example of one could be: C:\acu\wrun32.exe-c C:\config\wcbl11-sw CISCOLOG C: = drive indicator \acu\wrun32,exe=Location of runtime and runtime executable -c= runtime switch points to location of config file Config= Folder that contains the configuration file Wcbl11=name of the configuration file -sw= runtime switch means silently in background CISCOLOG= Our program to start the application. CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  42. HELP FILES Help files are available in various modules. They can be accessed by pressing the f1 key when you are in a field. Set the CISHELP variable in the configuration file to the program folder. How does it work? Place the cursor in the field and press F1 CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  43. CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  44. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS GUIDES This folder contains the hazardous material guide’s text information provided by DOT. It is usually located off you program directory. To properly use this file, you must also have a copy of HAZDATA and HMIDATA in your DATA directory. CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  45. Standard Operating Procedures Commonly referred to as SOP’s. This data file (SOPDATA) contains all of the SOP’s. The Print SOP Report button at the bottom of the screen allows standard print options for printing the displayed SOP data. Hint! If the Procedures are already typed in a word processor of some type, they can easily be attached to the CISCO application. CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  46. SOP example CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  47. Guide entry screen CISCO Conference 2005 - System Administration

  48. Thank you for attending