university of florida rehabilitation engineering research center on technology for successful aging l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
University of Florida Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Technology for Successful Aging PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
University of Florida Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Technology for Successful Aging

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 42

University of Florida Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Technology for Successful Aging - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 420 Views
  • Uploaded on

Funded by National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research University of Florida Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Technology for Successful Aging The University at Buffalo RERC-Aging (91 – 01)

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

University of Florida Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Technology for Successful Aging


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
university of florida rehabilitation engineering research center on technology for successful aging

Funded by

National Institute on Disability and

Rehabilitation Research

University of Florida

Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on

Technology for Successful Aging

the university at buffalo rerc aging 91 01
The University at Buffalo RERC-Aging (91 – 01)

Supported by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research of the USDE

slide3

Consumer Assessments Study

How do frail elders cope in face of

impairment / disability / pain?

in home interviews of frail elderly
In-Home Interviews of Frail Elderly
  • 2849 interviews over 10 years in Western New York and North Florida
r1 consumer assessments study
R1: Consumer Assessments Study
  • Explored functional needs of frail elders - over time (10 years) with focus on AT and Home Modifications
  • Provided direction for other RERC-Aging Research, Development, and Dissemination Projects
  • Participants serve as “sample pool” for other studies and projects – Continues today with
    • Concept testing, usability testing, prototype testing for industry
    • Focused research studies with additional grant funding
  • Led to present study: Needs and Barriers to Home Monitoring and Communications Technology
consumer assessments study data collected
Consumer Assessments Study: Data Collected
  • Demographics
  • Health status
  • Functional status
  • Psychosocial status
  • Services received
  • Quality of life
  • Caregiver survey (if person has family caregiver)
  • Ownership, use, satisfaction, problems with AT
  • Home / neighborhood environment & modifications
consumer assessments study findings
Consumer Assessments Study: Findings

Of all impairment groups, elders with cognitive impairments use the fewest number of assistive devices, with a mean of 5.8 devices per person (Mann et al., 1992).

the caregivers n 7
The Caregivers (n=7)
  • Mean age: 69.4 years (SD=6.2)
  • None employed
case 1 mrs grella slide 1
Case 1 - Mrs. Grella (slide 1)
  • MMSE Years 1, 2, 3 - -19, 0, 0
  • FIM Years 1, 2, 3 - - 81, 18, 18
  • SIP Years 1, 2, 3 - - 13.6, 42.1, 44.2
case 2 mrs grella slide 2
Case 2 - Mrs Grella (slide 2)

Devices Year 1, All used, satisfied with

1. Lock system - key required to exit

3. Watch with date

4. Hand written schedules

2. Towel bar and soap dish used as grab bars

5. Locking thermostat cover

case 2 mrs grella slide 3
Case 2 - Mrs. Grella (slide 3)

Devices Year 2, Changes in Year 1 Devices

  • uses none of the year one devices, now non-ambulatory

Devices Year 2, Additions

  • Incontinent briefs and pads, urinal
  • Over bed table
  • Hospital bed with double side rails
  • Hoyer Lift
case 2 mrs nichols slide 1
Case 2 - Mrs. Nichols (slide 1)
  • MMSE Years 1, 2, 4 - -17, 21, 9
  • FIM Years 1, 2, 4 - - 88, 73,29
case 3 mrs nichols slide 2
Case 3 - Mrs. Nichols (slide 2)

Year 1 Devices

  • Magnifiers
  • Calendar for orientation to date
  • Notes around home for reminders
case 3 mrs nichols slide 3
Case 3 - Mrs. Nichols (slide 3)

Year 2 Devices

  • No changes in Year 1 devices
  • Grab bar added in tub
case 3 mrs nichols slide 4
Case 3 - Mrs. Nichols (slide 4)

Year 4 Devices

  • Not using Year 1 Devices
  • Spouse added: wheelchair, wheelchair restraint, walker, bath chair, hospital bed, incontinence pads
summary alzheimers subjects
Summary - Alzheimers Subjects
  • High attrition, most to Nursing Homes
  • Those followed for two years (3 interviews)
    • Decline in mental and functional status
    • Increase in physical disability
    • Increase in #s of ADs owned
    • Little change in #s of ADs used
    • Major change in types of devices used
summary caregivers
Summary - Caregivers
  • Increase in hours spent caregiving
  • Increase in assistance and other resources
  • More depression
  • Burden dropped Year 2, increased Year 3
technology for successful aging

Technology for Successful Aging

University of Florida

Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on

Technology for Successful Aging

Funded by

National Institute on Disability and

Rehabilitation Research

why cell phones
Why Cell Phones?
  • Elders are accustomed to using phones – it is one of their most important technology devices
  • Most portable and mobile device
  • Better chances for acceptability as compared to other computing devices
  • Smart Phone evolution:
    • Voice
    • Computer and IP data network on board
    • Platform standardization  enabling third party application developers
smart phones

Code reader

(Smart ID,

RFID,…)

Wider

Screen

Back-lit &

Contrasting colors

Full-day

Back

Battery

Wider

Vertical

Key

Spacing

Larger fonts

Back-lit

Audio-feedback

Wider

Phone

Keypad

Wider

Horizontal

Key

Spacing

Smart Phones
smart phone carry anywhere assistant32

Smart

Phone

Smart Phone – Carry Anywhere Assistant

Grocery Stores

On the road

Restaurants

Doctor Office

. . . . . .

Parking Lots

Other Smart Spaces

… and Away

emerging mobile wearable
Emerging Mobile & Wearable

Subscriber Identification

Module (SIM)

wireless networks

Global

Satellite

dik

©

Suburban

Urban

In-Building

Pico-Cell

Micro-Cell

Macro-Cell

In-Room

(BlueTooth)

Wireless Networks
slide35

Automatically refill

prescription

Check if

laundry is done

Sense and see

visitors/strangers

at front door

Turn on/off

lights (and

visually

inspect)

other

rooms.

Check locks

on doors and

windows

Monitor

of kitchen:

oven and

stove on/off;

temp.

Call in for

help and

Assistance

Order groceries

with dietary

restrictions

Call in

a nurse

Other

Services

honeywell partnership
Honeywell Partnership
  • Leverage of Smart Home technology: The Independent LifeStyle Assistant (ILSA) Program
  • Plans for future collaboration on joint applications that uses Smart Phones and ILSA
  • Testing in the homes of elders beginning October, 2002 (next month).
cognitive assistance
Cognitive Assistance
  • U. of Wisconsin – focus on mild impairment
  • U. of Florida – focus on moderate impairment
    • Addressing interface questions
partnership with veterans health administration
Partnership with Veterans Health Administration
  • Tele-homecare demonstration
  • Low ADL Monitoring Project (LAMP) Spinning off applications from RERC to Veterans in VISN-8
issues relating to older drivers
Issues Relating to Older Drivers
  • Testing
  • Remediation
  • Florida ‘leading the nation’ in older drivers
policy
Policy
  • Promoting home based services versus institutional
  • Reimbursement for independence tools and services
  • Models that promote independence
international conference on aging disability and independence

International Conference on Aging, Disability, and Independence

December 4-6, 2003

Washington, DC

slide42

THE END

rerc.ufl.edu

THank You