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Building Bridges Fall 2005 Conference. Forging new generations of engineers. TECH PREP ON STEROIDS. PROJECT LEAD THE WAY. College and Career Transitions Initiative (system). Academy of Engineering Technology (Program). PLTW Curriculum. PLTW. Building a Transition System.

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slide1

Building Bridges Fall 2005

Conference

Forging new generations of engineers

slide2

TECH PREP ON STEROIDS

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY

College and Career Transitions Initiative (system)

Academy of Engineering Technology (Program)

PLTW

Curriculum

PLTW

Building a Transition System

the engineering problem

Academy of Engineering Technology

The Engineering Problem

There are currently 1,300,000 engineering/engineering technology jobs available in the U.S. without trained people to fill them.

advanced manufacturing survey
Advanced Manufacturing Survey
  • Surveyed over 200 Advanced Manufacturing Firms in St. Louis County.
  • Job training starting in High School was cited as the second highest need area / priority area for improvement.
  • # 1 Challenge facing companies was lack of skilled labor.
  • Improving training was most cited as specific action that would enhance the local business climate / grow local economy.
slide5

Academy of Engineering Technology

The Challenge

Schools are not graduating enough qualified engineers and technicians to meet the demands of business.

  • A shortage of engineers and technicians exists.
  • Enrollments in local university Engineering programs are down.
  • Persistence to graduation is down.
  • There is a need for engineers and engineering technicians in the St. Louis area.
slide6

Academy of Engineering Technology

And to further complicate the problem…1. By 2010, half of all baby boomers will have left the workforce.2. By 2020, the other half will be retired.

slide8

PLTW

Curriculum

“…a national program forming partnerships (currently over 500) among public schools, higher education institutions and the private sector to increase the quantity and quality of engineers and engineering technologists graduating from our educational system

slide9

High School Course Program

  • Principles of Engineering
  • Introduction to Engineering Design
  • Digital Electronics
  • Computer Integrated Manufacturing
  • Engineering Design and Development

Note: Course program requires college entrance mathematics each year.

school district partners agree to

Academy of Engineering Technology

-- School District partners agree to --
  • Implement PLTW high school course curriculum
  • Identify and send to be trained appropriate teachers
  • Identify & support school counselors in the Fall professional development conference
  • Participate in regional consortium activities
in 2001 the jones study found secondary career and technical education in st louis was viewed as
In 2001, the Jones Study found secondary career and technical education in St. Louis was viewed as:
  • Important
  • Underutilized
  • Lacked a constituency
  • Had a negative image
  • Not a “real” high school
  • Old fashioned
  • An improvement
  • A supplement, not a replacement
  • Pathways made sense
  • Untested in St. Louis Co.
  • Site challenges
  • Best located in district high schools

Career Academies were viewed as:

academy overview

Academy of

Engineering

Technology

Academy Overview

Academy of Information

Technology

Academy

of Life

Sciences

slide13

What is a Career Academy?

A small learning communityof students who take classes together for at least two years in a common subject area.

The curriculum encompasses acareer theme, enabling the students to see the relationships between academic subjects and their application to a broad field of work.

The curriculum includesextensive partnershipswith employers,colleges, and the community, bringing resources in from outside the school to improve student motivation and achievement.

slide14

Career Academies are

the band experience

for technical students

slide15

Engineering Technology: an Articulated Curriculum

4+2+2 articulated program of study in Engineering Tech-nology between participating High Schools, St. Louis Community College and 4-year partner institutions based on the Project Lead The Way

(PLTW) model

Engineering Technology Pathway Vision

A Seamless 4+2+2 Pathway:

4

2

2

High School

St. Louis Community College at Florissant Valley

University

slide16

PLTW

Curriculum

Academy of Engineering Technology (Program)

St. Louis Regional

Academy of Engineering Technology

A Project Lead The Way initiative in partnership with St. Louis Community College, St. Louis County Economic Council, and these High Schools:

Clayton

Hazelwood Central

Hazelwood East

Hazelwood West

Kirkwood

Lindbergh

Mehlville

Parkway

Pattonville

Riverview Gardens

Rockwood

St. Louis Public Schools

slide17

Academy of Engineering Technology

ACADEMIC CLASSES

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY CLASSES

St. Louis Community College at Florissant Valley –

Dept. of Engineering & Technology

Academy

of

Engineering

Technology

Mathematics, Science, English

Social Studies, Physical Education

Music / Art / Business

Senior

Engineering Design and Development

(2 hours)

Computer Integrated Manufacturing

(1 hour)

Mathematics, Science, English

Social Studies, Phys. Ed. / Health

Music / Art / Business

Junior

Digital Electronics

(1 hour)

High

Schools

Introduction to Engineering Design

(1 hour)

Mathematics, Science, English

Social Studies, Foreign Language

Phys. Ed. / SH, Music / Art /Business

Sophomore

Principles of Engineering

(1 hour)

Mathematics, Science, English

Social Studies, Foreign Language

Phys. Ed. / SH, Music / Art /Business

Freshman

slide18

Academy of Engineering Technology

____ CAREER CLUSTER CLASSES

COLLEGE - PREP ACADEMIC CLASSES

Course may be taught

at high school or at a 2-year college, and should be taught as a dual-credit course.

Capstone Authentic Design

and Projects

(1 or 2 hours)

Mathematics (College Algebra) Science (advanced) , Communications Arts (writing intensive)

Social Studies, Phys. Ed.

and supporting electives

Senior

Mathematics (Trigonometry), Science (advanced), Communications Arts (writing intensive)

Social Studies, Phys. Ed.

and supporting electives

Junior

Courses may be taught at high school or at a 2 year college, and may be offered as a dual-credit course.

Specialized Technical

Concepts and Contents

(1 or 2 hours)

Curriculum Integration

Mathematics (Geometry), Science (Biology or Chemistry), Communications Arts (writing intensive)

Social Studies, Foreign Language

Phys. Ed., and supporting electives

Sophomore

Courses Taught at High School during Freshmen and Sophomore Years

Applications of Technical Concepts

(1 hour)

Mathematics (Algebra I), Science (Biology or Physical Science), Communications Arts,

Social Studies,

Phys. Ed., and electives

Freshman

Introduction to Technical Foundations

(1 hour)

slide19

Articulation–

Academy of Engineering Technology

12 credit hours of transferable credit for completion of the PLTW course of study based on the following courses:

GE:131 Engineering Technology Orientation 1 hour

EGR:145 Computer Solids Modeling 2 hours

ME:140 Introduction to Robotics 3 hours

EE:230 Analog and Digital Electronics 3 hours

ESC:100 Engineering Computer Appls/Design 3 hours

slide21

Academy of Engineering Technology

Academy graduates will be able to:

1. use technology in problem solving.

2. understand and apply the scientific process.

3. be prepared for challenging college Engineering courses.

4. understand technological systems.

5. use mathematics in problem solving.

6. communicate effectively.

7. work in teams.

slide22

Academy of Engineering Technology

What will an Engineering Academy graduate know and be able to do?

We are perfect partners. We work together. Some parts I don’t understand, and he explains it to me exactly. It’s been a very good experience; I really like this project.

Student, Clayton High School

hstw 2002 naep assessment
HSTW 2002 NAEP Assessment

How effective is the PLTW Curriculum?

All HSTW sites who participated in both the 2000 (Mature Sites) and 2002 assessments

Total Students N= 35,422

Total CTE Students N= 29,184

slide24

Academy of Engineering Technology

Students who complete the five-course curriculum outperform other high school students enrolled in Technical courses in the areas of Reading, Math, and Science as measured by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP Test).

slide25

Academy of Engineering Technology

Project Lead The Way has been shown to be an

excellent stimulus for college attendance

slide26

Academy of Engineering Technology

Introduction at this level will attract more students to engineering, and will allow students, while still in high school, to determine if engineering is the career they desire. Students participating in PLTW courses are better prepared for college engineering programs and more likely to be successful, thus reducing the attrition rate in these college programs, which currently exceeds 50% nationally.

what causes this performance
What causes this performance?

Students are volunteers. Their attendance can be commanded, but their attention must be earned.

I think it’s definitely challenging. I’ve been staying after and coming early so much, because it’s not something that you can work on just during the class period and go home and stop thinking about it.

Gabe Rischal, Student

Clayton High School

beliefs that underlie pltw
Beliefs That Underlie PLTW

The business of school is to provide students with opportunities to do quality work; work that is engaging, work with which they will persist.

I think it’s really cool. We get to work with hands-on stuff. This is a lot more fun than just sitting and doing paperwork. With this, if it doesn’t work, you’ll see how it doesn’t work and hopefully why it doesn’t work. The real world . . . where things don’t necessarily always work.

Mark Goldman, Student

Clayton High School

results
Results……

Students learn, test scores increase, and discipline problems decrease when schools provide students with the right work.

Matt Dieckhaus, former Engineering Instructor, Clayton High School, Clayton, Missouri

slide31

Lesson Number 10

The implementation of our partnership at times was challenged by disconnected systems.

lesson number 9
Lesson Number 9

Students, parents, and K-12 educators get conflicting messages about what students need to know to enter and succeed in college.

slide33

Lesson Number 8

High School

Science, technology and mathematics coursework between high school and college is not connected.

College

slide34

Lesson Number 7

Students graduate from high school under one set of standards and three months later are required to meet a whole new set of standards in college.

REMEDIAL WRECKING BALL

slide35

Lesson Number 6

Current data systems are not equipped to address students’ needs across systems.

slide36

Lesson Number 5

No one is held accountable for issues related to student transitions from high school to college.

slide37

Lesson Number 4

While we share the common goal of improving student performance, we often act in isolation; thus, efforts are sometimes conflicting or duplicated, and often certain needs are never addressed.

slide38

Lesson Number 3

Do not be afraid to question or ask for policy changes on current practices that do not facilitate the end result.

slide39

Lesson Number 2

A coherent sequence of academically rigorous courses that prepares students for more advanced coursework related to their occupational area of interest and successful completion of state academic standards; an exception, not a rule, in our high schools.

slide40

Lesson Number 1

A coherent sequence of rigorous technical skill coursework for grades 9 - 12 that culminates in dual/concurrent enrollment credit.

Hopeful Parents

slide42

We would . . .

Get agreement at the very beginning about common data points that we all could use to measure progress; such as:

HSSE

Explore

Plan

ACT

Accuplacer

slide43

We would . . .

Stress that community college minimum entry requirements do not mean minimum preparation.

We would make greater efforts to dispel this misconception.

slide44

We would . . .

Demonstrate that the main purpose of rigorous technical coursework, at the secondary level, is to increase student achievement in math and science, thereby reducing postsecondary remediation.

PLTW data

slide45

We would . . .

Educate community college staff about the State K-12 standards.

slide46

We would . . .

Make efforts to get everyone to understand how their teaching directly affects a student’s transition to college and that they are accountable for that transition.

slide48

We would . . .

Start small and prepare for rapid growth, only dealing with committed partners.

slide49

We would . . .

Use data to select diverse partners.

Diversity attracts business interest.

slide50

We would . . .

Ask community colleges to identify their standards.

All partners must come to the table with a set of student expectations.

slide51

We would . . .

Not get bogged down with common high school course titles; i.e., Algebra I, Algebra II, Integrated Mathematical Concepts.

Worry about grade-level expectations and outcomes.

slide52

We would . . .

Not make assumptions that most secondary instructors understand postsecondary expectations.

There is a possible disconnect between State standards and Postsecondary standards.

slide53

The Academy of Engineering Technology Success Formula

PROVEN CURRICULUM

COMMITTED PARTNERS

+ CCTI ENHANCEMENT

= ENSURESSTUDENT SUCCESS

/

slide54

TECH PREP ON STEROIDS

College and Career Transitions Initiative (system)

Academy of Engineering Technology (Program)

PLTW

Curriculum

Building a Transition System

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY

PLTW