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International Financial Management Chapter 5 International financial management. Michael Connolly School of Business Administration, University of Miami. Michael Connolly © 2007. Summary. Capital structure of the firm The weighted average cost of borrowing

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International financial management chapter 5 international financial management

International Financial ManagementChapter 5 International financial management

Michael Connolly

School of Business Administration,

University of Miami

Michael Connolly © 2007

Chapter 5


Summary
Summary

  • Capital structure of the firm

  • The weighted average cost of borrowing

  • Cross-listing on foreign stock exchanges

  • Transfer pricing

  • International taxation

  • Working capital

  • Cash netting

  • Mergers and acquisitions

  • Offshore banking

  • An international business plan

  • Optimal international investing

Chapter 5


Capital structure
Capital structure

  • There are two ways of financing your firm, by contracting debt (business loans) or issuing equity (shares).

  • Creditors have senior debt that must be paid or satisfied, except in the case of bankruptcy. Shareholders participate in ownership of the firm, so they share in business risk and risk of bankruptcy.

  • Due to the greater risk, shareholders typically require a higher rate of return on their equity. Interest payments to creditors are treated as an expense, so they are a “tax shield” for the firm

Chapter 5


Capital structure1
Capital structure

  • The cost of capital is thus a weighted average of the after-tax cost of borrowing (D) and the cost of issuing equity (E).

    where WACC indicates the weighted average cost of capital, the cost of debt, D, the cost of equity, E, and the marginal corporate tax rate.

Chapter 5


Capital structure2
Capital structure

  • For example, assume your firm has 30% debt and 70% equity. It can borrow at 10% by selling its corporate bonds, while its shareholders require a 14% return on investment due to a 9.5% market risk premium on your company.

  • Consequently, the weighted average cost of capital is:

  • Your firm should use this rate to discount future cash flows.

Chapter 5


Capital structure3
Capital structure

  • Due to the tax shield of borrowing and to the low degree of risk to the initial loans, the WACC initially declines with greater financial leverage.

  • With a high degree of financial leverage approaching one), the risk of financial distress and bankruptcy increase.

  • This causes both the borrowing rate and the equity rate to rise sharply.

Chapter 5


Capital structure4
Capital structure

  • Consequently, there is an optimum capital structure which minimizes the weighted average cost of capital

Chapter 5


International capital structure
International capital structure

  • International capital structure - , the basic rule for conversion of the WACC in dollars to say pounds for purposes of discounting pound cash flows, the interest rate parity rule is:

    or

Chapter 5


International capital structure1
International capital structure

  • If your weighted average cost of capital is 11.05% in USD,Treasuries in the U.K yield 3.0% and in the U.S. 4.5%, your WACC in pounds is:

    reflecting the lower expected inflation rate in the U.K.

  • When risk free Treasuries are not available, the expected inflation rates may be substituted for the interest rates: That is use PPP instead of IRP.

    .

Chapter 5


Crosslisting on foreign stock exchanges
Crosslisting on foreign stock exchanges

  • Crosslisting on foreign stock exchanges - By crosslisting its shares on foreign stock exchanges - despite additional disclosure, listing and reporting costs - a firm can improve the liquidity of its existing shares by making it easierfor foreign shareholders to acquire shares at home in their own currencies.

  • Crosslisting may also increase the share price by overcoming mis-pricing in a segmented, illiquid, home capital market.

Chapter 5


Transfer pricing
Transfer pricing

  • Transfer pricing refers to pricing of the transfer of goods, services, and technology between related units of the firm. It is done both domestically and internationally.

The marginal cost of the marketing and the production divisions are summed vertically to yield the marginal cost of the final product. Setting marginal cost of the final product equal to its marginal product yields the profit-maximizing level of production, 100, and a price of $8.

Chapter 5


Transfer pricing1
Transfer pricing

  • To provide the correct incentives to the production division, a transfer price of $3 is optimal. In its production decisions, the production division sets marginal cost equal to $3 to maximize profits, producing exactly the required amount of intermediate inputs.

  • When there is a possibility to buy or sell the intermediate input externally to other firms at a fixed price, the firm should regard this price as the opportunity cost of the intermediate input.

Chapter 5


Transfer pricing2
Transfer pricing

  • When the market for the intermediate good is not competitive, the marketing division should set a higher transfer price to its internal division, and restrict its purchases slightly from the external market. Profit-maximization requires:

    Where represents the transfer price,

    the price at which the firm purchases the input on the external market, and e the elasticity of supply of the intermediate input to the marketing division.

Chapter 5


Transfer pricing3
Transfer pricing

  • Abusive transfer pricing takes place for the main purpose of reducing taxation by shifting profits from high tax to low tax jurisdictions, if not to tax havens.

In this example, Stanly Wurks, CT produces a hammer at a marginal cost of $2, sells it for $1, a loss of $1, to the FSC located in a Bahamian tax haven. In turn, Stanly Wurks, Europe pays $5 to the FSC and sells the hammer at $3.75 in Europe, losing $1.25.

The IRS could penalize this

abuse of transfer pricing.

Chapter 5


Transfer pricing4
Transfer pricing

  • If the production division produces more of the intermediate input than sold to the marketing division and has monopoly power in the market for the intermediate input, its optimal transfer price is below the price at which it sells the intermediate input to the external market.

    where h is the absolute value of the elasticity of market demand for the intermediate good.

Chapter 5


Transfer pricing5
Transfer pricing

  • For example, if h = 2, the optimum transfer price is 50% below the price at which the intermediate input is sold on the external market.

  • If the external market were perfectly competitive, h approaches infinity, and the optimal transfer price equals the market price of the intermediate good.

Chapter 5


International taxation
International taxation

  • The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) of the World Trade Organization (WTO) governs the tax treatment of branches and subsidiaries located abroad. If a branch or subsidiary is located in a signatory country, it is entitled to “national treatment” - that is, tax and regulatory treatment no less favorable than that accorded to national enterprises.

Chapter 5


International taxation1
International taxation

  • Article III National Treatment on Internal Taxation and Regulation explicitly forbids discrimination against foreign subsidiaries. Consequently, a firm with a foreign subsidiary may appeal any discriminatory treatment to the GATT/WTO in Geneva, Switzerland. Its corporate income tax cannot be higher than that of local companies, it cannot be charged higher duties to import intermediate goods, nor be required to purchase inputs locally to protect domestic production.

Chapter 5


International taxation2
International taxation

  • Income derived from foreign subsidiaries is fully taxable at U.S. rates, but eligible for tax credits on taxes deemed paid abroad up to its marginal tax rate. A tax credit thus typically reduces the tax liability of the parent firm by the full amount paid in foreign taxes. If the foreign corporate rate is above 35%, a deferred tax credit is given on the amount above 35% or is combined with other sources of foreign income less that 35% to reduce the rate to an effective 35%.

Chapter 5


International taxation3
International taxation

  • A foreign sales corporation (FSC) allows firms having export operations to enjoy exemption of most export income from U.S. taxes, even when the good is produced in the U.S. Exempt foreign trade income derives from “export property” sold, leased, or rented outside the United States by the FSC.

  • Profits not repatriated escape U.S. taxation altogether, in violation of Article VI Anti-Dumping of the GATT/WTO.

Chapter 5


International taxation4
International taxation

  • A foreign majority-controlled branch is treated as part of the parent firm and thus must repatriate profits and pay home taxes contemporaneously.

  • A subsidiary incorporated locally need not repatriate profits, nor pay home country taxes unless it remits the profits.

  • Foreign income tax credits apply in both cases.

  • The value-added tax and sales taxes are deducted from income, and thus treated as expenses.

Chapter 5


International taxation examples
International taxation: examples

  • Country A, where the affiliate is located is a high-tax country, so that the home country, assumed to be the U.S., issues an excess tax credit to the parent firm.

Chapter 5


International taxation examples1
International taxation: examples

  • Country B is a comparable tax country.

  • No U.S. taxes would be paid, the firm receiving a full tax credit for the 35% corporate income tax.

Chapter 5


International taxation examples2
International taxation: examples

  • Country C is a low tax country.

Chapter 5


International taxation examples3
International taxation: examples

  • The tax treatment of affiliates located in Country D, a tax haven.

Chapter 5


International taxation examples4
International taxation: examples

  • A Foreign Sales Corporation located in a tax haven benefits either from 34% exemption, or 17/23 exemption of foreign source income depending on whether arm’s length pricing or administrative rules pricing is applied. The total exemption of foreign possessions source income or possessions derived investment income is also shown.

Chapter 5


Working capital
Working capital

  • A firm must have operating balances to manage its receivables, inventories and payables. Its net working capital finances the cash conversion cycle from raw inputs to final product and sale.

Chapter 5


Cash netting
Cash netting

  • If subsidiary A must pay 150 euros to subsidiary C for widgets, and C must may A 100 euros for intermediate inputs for assembling widgets, rather than having two separate transactions, subsidiary A (or a centralized facility) can simply pay subsidiary C 50 euros.

  • The single transaction nets the payment saves the multinational firm transactions and spread fees in its cash operations.

Chapter 5


Mergers and acquisitions
Mergers and acquisitions

  • A merger is the absorption of one firm by another. Firm A might acquire firm B by offering two shares in A for each share of B. B would then cease to exist. Typically, two thirds of the voting shares of each firm must approve the merger. In general, a merger is only worthwhile is there is synergy in combining the firms:

  • The value of the merged firm should be greater than the individual firms taken alone.

Chapter 5


Mergers and acquisitions1
Mergers and acquisitions

  • When firm A and firm B consolidate into a new firm C, in general it should be true that:

  • In practical terms, a consolidation is equivalent to a merger.

Chapter 5


Mergers and acquisitions2
Mergers and acquisitions

  • Acquisition by cash

  • After the acquisition, the combined firms are worth $170. Synergy is thus $20. Firm A could acquire firm B by paying $60 in cash, a premium of $10 over its market value in order to secure the 2/3 vote necessary of B’s shareholders. Each share would be tendered at $6 while it was previously worth $5.

Chapter 5


Mergers and acquisitions3
Mergers and acquisitions

  • Acquisition by cash

    The value of Firm A after the acquisition will therefore be $170 minus the $60 paid to B’s stockholders. A is thus worth $110 after the acquisition, or:

Chapter 5


Mergers and acquisitions4
Mergers and acquisitions

  • Acquisition by shares

    How many shares should A offer to B’s shareholders? The correct amount would equal the ratio: a170 = 60, giving them shares worth $60. That is, a = 60/170 = 0.352941176 of the combined company.

    and

    We can solve for the number of new shares issued, , in addition to the exiting number of shares, n = 20.

Chapter 5


Mergers and acquisitions5
Mergers and acquisitions

  • Acquisition by shares

  • Firm A’s situation is now:

  • The 10.91 shares offered to shareholders of B are worth exactly $60 at the new market price of $5.50!

Chapter 5


Mergers and acquisitions6
Mergers and acquisitions

  • Acquisition by shares and cash

  • Suppose firm A acquires firm by an offer of both cash and stock, for instance, $30 in cash and the rest in stock.

  • How many shares of stock will firm A have to offer? Firm A will therefore be worth $140 after the cash payment of $30. In this case a = 30/140 = .21428571429.

Chapter 5


Mergers and acquisitions7
Mergers and acquisitions

  • Acquisition by shares and cash

  • By offering exactly 5.45455 shares and $30 in cash, Firm A would be offering the same premium as with pure cash or pure stock. Notice that the 5.45455 new shares are worth exactly $30 at the new share price of A, $5.5.

Chapter 5


Mergers and acquisitions8
Mergers and acquisitions

  • Acquisition by shares and cash

    Firm A’s new situation would be as follows:

Chapter 5


Alternatives to acquisition
Alternatives to acquisition

▪ Joint ventures involve local partners who share in the managerial and financial decision-making in the local venture.

  • Direct licensing agreements and management contracts allow headquarters to share in some of the profits from a locally owned operation. Direct foreign investment should be considered as an alternative.

  • A strategic alliance takes place when two firms exchange stock and form a separate joint venture to develop and manufacture a product or service.

Chapter 5


Offshore banking
Offshore banking

  • Offshore banking refers to deposits and loans that are made in a country other than the depositor’s or borrower’s country of origin.

Chapter 5


Offshore banking1
Offshore banking

  • The key differences between offshore banking and domestic banking are the currency of denomination, the tax jurisdiction and the regulatory framework.

  • For accounts payable and hedging purposes, it is often convenient to hold cash balances in a foreign currency.

  • In some cases, however, offshore banking is used for money-laundering.

Chapter 5


An international business plan
An international business plan

  • The principal ways of organizing a business are:

    • A sole proprietorship involves an individual acting on his or her own behalf in a business context.

    • A partnership formed by the independent action of the partners whose rights and duties are spelled out in business charters.

    • A limited partnership involves one or more investing partners and at least one operating partner. An investing partner is liable only to the extent of that partner's investment.

    • A corporation is a single entity, a "person" that may sue or be sued without its members being held liable. Owners may enter or withdraw from the venture at any time by buying or selling shares.

Chapter 5


An international business plan1
An international business plan

  • The principal ways of terminating a business are:

    • Legal bankruptcy (Firms or creditors bring petitions to a court for bankruptcy.)

      • In Chapter 7, or liquidation cases, the debtor's property is sold off by a trustee to pay the debts owed to creditors. An individual debtor can keep a modest amount of household property or realty under federal or state exemptions.

      • In Chapter 11, or business reorganization, the business is continued by its management or a trustee while creditors' claims are frozen pending approval of a plan. With court approval, the plan can modify or forgive debts, recapitalize a corporation, provide for mergers or takeovers, or dispose of assets.

Chapter 5


An international business plan2
An international business plan

  • The profit-maximizing point:In operations, setting marginal cost (the slope of the cost curve) equal to marginal revenue (the slope of the revenue curve) maximizes profits, p, the difference between revenues and costs.

Chapter 5


An international business plan3
An international business plan

  • The net present value of the firm is given by substituting forecasted profits into the NPV formula using the firm’s cost of borrowing, i, to discount future cash flows:

    where T is the terminal value of the firm in its fifth year. The terminal value is an estimate of its resale value based on discounted profits from the sixth year onward. At worst, if the firm ceases operations, it could be its scrap value.

Chapter 5


The aztec caf
The Aztec Café

▪ Let’s take the example of the Aztec Café whose revenues and costs are in Mexican pesos. As a start-up in 2001, its initial investment costs were N$500,000 for the oven and new hood with fire extinguisher, grease trap, tables, chairs and dinnerware, plus renovation of the existing facility.

▪ The owner/manager, Juan Olive had borrowed from a local bank the entire start up amount at 22% in pesos, which gives us the weighted average cost of capital (no equity was brought to the project).

▪ Juan elected straight line depreciation of his investment over five years.

Chapter 5


The aztec caf1
The Aztec Café

▪ Unfortunately, the business plan was done at the end of the Aztec’s first year of operations in May 2001. Had it been done earlier, the project would not have taken place.

▪ The Aztec’s forecasted revenue and costs yielded a free cash flow projection for five years. In addition, a terminal value was predicted as a no-growth perpetuity of its fifth year’s free cash flow.

Chapter 5


The aztec caf2
The Aztec Café

▪In the first year, Juan accumulated arrears in his rent, his loan and in payment of the 15% value-added tax in Mexico. His cash-flow was negative so he sought finance by running arrears. The value of debt arrears had to be subtracted from the net present value of forecasted free-cash flow to value the restaurant.

Chapter 5


The aztec caf3
The Aztec Café

▪ The landlord could padlock the restaurant door at any moment with a court order, and the lender could seize the oven and equipment as secured collateral. The state was about to file criminal charges for tax evasion. The Aztec Café was clearly in serious financial distress.

▪ Could it be sold? No, the restaurant had negative net worth of $46,308. Its forecasted cash flow was also negative.

▪ New equity financing was sought to recapitalize the restaurant and re-pay the loan, rent and tax arrears. Potential investors took the position was that any more money put into the venture would be lost.

Chapter 5


The aztec caf4
The Aztec Café

▪The dénouement

▪ The Aztec Café was liquidated in June 2001.

▪ The owner turned in his keys to the landlord.

▪ The bank took the equipment and sold it in auction. It also required the owner to sell his home, applying the equity to the unpaid balance. It rescheduled the remaining balance and penalties.

▪ Finally, he negotiated forgiveness of the arrears in the value added tax.

▪ Moral of the story: look before you leap! That is, do a reasoned business plan.Also, be wary of high financial leverage, especially 100%.

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • Market and unique risk

    • Market risk, also known as systematic risk, represents risk factors that are common to the whole economy. Firm specific risk, also known as diversifiable risk, represent risk factors that can be eliminated by diversification. The variance of security i, , can be written as the sum of the market risk and the firm specific risk:

      5.15 where

      and is the covariance between security i’s return and the market return, and is the variance of the market return.

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment1
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • Market and unique risk: the Beta

    The beta,b, of an individual security measures the security’s sensitivity to market movements and therefore is known as its market risk. For example, the beta of the Standard and Poor’s 500 index share should be about one since it reflects a broad selection of market stocks. A riskier security would have a beta greater than one, and a less risky security would have a beta less than one.

    The is the firm specific, diversifiable risk.

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment2
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • Portfolio diversification

    • The level of market risk is dealt with by choosing the betas in the portfolio since the systematic risk is a weighted average of the individual security betas. Systematic variance equals , where is the simple average of the individual security betas.

    • By choosing , we decide the systematic variance of the portfolio. A choice of domestic and international betas can reduce systematic risk relative to a choice of only domestic betas. In short, systematic risk is manipulated by choosing the average beta of the securities, but the number of securities does not matter.

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment3
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • Portfolio diversification

    • Non-systematic risk, ,is diversifiable by increasing the number of securities. By sufficiently diversifying, the investor can virtually eliminate firm-specific risk. By holding both domestic and international securities, portfolio diversification is more efficient since the universe of assets is the choice set.

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment4
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • Portfolio diversification

    Figure 5.7

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment5
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • Asset allocation with one domestic and one foreign asset

  • Here we consider the allocation of the investment budget between two risky funds, a domestic fund and a foreign fund. If the proportion invested in the domestic fund is , then the remainder is invested in the international (g for global) fund, .

  • Some basic relationships hold:

    5.16

    • That is, the rate of return on the portfolio is a weighted average of the rates of return on the domestic and global funds.

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment6
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • Asset allocation with one domestic and one foreign asset

  • 5.17

  • That is, the expected rate of return on the portfolio is a weighted average of the expected rates of return on the domestic and global funds.

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment7
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • Asset allocation with one domestic and one foreign asset

    5.18

    That is, the variance of the portfolio is the sum of the square of weighted volatilities plus a term involving the correlation coefficient, , between the domestic and the global funds.

Chapter 5



Optimal international portfolio investment9
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • The efficient investment frontier

    The efficient investment frontier is derived by maximizing the expected return, subject to a given risk. Alternatively, it can be derived by minimizing the risk for a given expected rate of return on the portfolio. For a given level of risk, ,the efficient weight of the global asset is given by:

    5.19

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment10
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • The efficient investment frontier

    Note that this is the share of the global asset necessary to be on the efficient investment frontier, a purely technical condition. This share maximizes expected portfolio return for each level of risk.

    Our next step in the optimal efficient portfolio analysis is to maximize the Sharpe “reward to risk” ratio.

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment11
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • The capital allocation line (CAL)

  • Investors may be risk averse, demanding a higher rate of return - a risk premium - for holding risky assets. Risk may be reduced either by converting risky assets into safe assets such as money market assets or by constructing a risky portfolio efficiently, diversifying away unsystematic risk. Consider an investor holding a risky portfolio, P, along with a risk-free asset, T, such as US T-bills. The risky portfolio consists of some domestic and some foreign assets

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment12
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • For example, a hypothetical portfolio might be:

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment13
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • This investor is holding 62.5% of her risky portfolio in IBM, US and 37.5% of P in Tiger International. Let w represent the holdings in US securities and w* indicate the holdings of international securities in the risky portfolio, so that w+w*=1. Thus, w=0.625 and w*=0.375. The weight of the risky portfolio, P, in the complete portfolio, C, including risk-free investments is denoted by z. Thus the weight of the risk-free asset in the complete portfolio is 1-z. T-bills represent 20% of the complete portfolio, or 1-z = 0.2, and risky assets 80% of C, or z = 0.8. IBM, US represents 50% of the complete portfolio and Tiger International 30%.

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment14
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • The investor is thus holding a risk-free asset and a bundle of risky assets which can be thought of as one risky asset. In this way, the investor can keep the relative shares of the two risky assets constant in the risky portfolio P, and at the same time reduce risk by selling them off proportionately to acquire more of the risk-free asset, Treasuries.

  • By changing the distribution of the risky asset relative to the risk-free asset, yet maintaining the mix of assets in the risky portfolio, the investor can reduce the risk of the complete portfolio yet remain on the efficient investment frontier. That is, z can be reduced in C while maintaining w and w* fixed in P.

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment15
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • Portfolio expected return and risk

  • Notation:

  • Rate of return on the risky portfolio

  • Rate of return on the risk-free asset

  • Expected rate of return on the risky portfolio

  • The standard deviation (volatility)of the risky portfolio

  • Expected rate of return on the risk-free asset

  • Expected rate of return on the complete portfolio

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment16
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • Consequently, with a fraction z of risky assets in the portfolio and 1-z of risk-free assets, the rate of return on the complete portfolio is:

  • 5.20

  • Consequently, the expected rate of return on the complete portfolio is:

  • 5.21 Or equivalently,

  • 5.23

  • That is, the complete portfolio has a base return equal the risk-free rate plus an expected market risk premium, on its exposure to risky assets, z.

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment17
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • Risk-averse investors demand a positive market risk premium. The standard deviation of the complete portfolio is indicated by:

  • 5.24 since the volatility of the risk free asset is zero.

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment18
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • Substituting into 5.23, we have:

  • which is the capital allocation line (CAL). Figure 5.9 plots the capital allocation line (CAL) depicting the rise in expected portfolio return against the standard deviation of the risky asset.

Chapter 5



Optimal international portfolio investment20
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • The slope of the investment opportunity schedule is the Sharpe “reward to risk” ratio:

  • 5.25

  • The slope is also called the reward-to-volatility ratio since it is the ratio of the market risk premium to the standard deviation of the risky portfolio.

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment21
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • Consider the following utility (happiness or choice) function:

  • 5.26

  • This investor enjoys higher expected return, , but dislikes higher risk, . The level of risk aversion is A >0. The higher A, the more risk averse the investor.

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment22
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • Utility maximization: mathematically

  • The investor’s objective is to maximize utility (utils!) by selecting the fraction, z, of the investment budget to be invested in the risky portfolio, P. The expected return and variance of the complete portfolio are and respectively. To choose the best allocation to the risky asset, we maximize utility, equation 5.26 with respect to z. That is, maximize the quadratic utility function with respect to z.

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment23
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • Utility maximization: mathematically

    yielding the optimal share of the risky portfolio in the complete portfolio:

  • Where z* indicates the optimal share of the risky asset. The optimal share of the risky asset:

    • Rises with increases in the market risk premium,

    • Falls with increases in the degree of risk aversion, A.

    • Falls with increases in market volatility, .

Chapter 5


Optimal international portfolio investment24
Optimal international portfolio investment

  • Utility maximization: graphically

  • Figure 5.10 illustrates the optimal allocation of assets for a risk averse investor who chooses to hold approximately half the portfolio in the risky asset and half in the safe asset. This optimal allocation yields the highest level of utility (at point C, the tangency of the capital allocation line and the highest indifference curve).

Chapter 5


Optimal investment decisions
Optimal investment decisions

▪ A risk averse investor mixes risk free Treasuries with an efficient risky portfolio, thus maximizing her utility:

Figure 5.10

Chapter 5


Optimal investment decisions an example
Optimal investment decisions: an example

▪ For example, an investor might optimally hold half her complete portfolio in risky assets:

where

▪ The market risk premium is 15%.

▪ Her degree of risk aversion, A, equals 2.

▪ Market variance, ,is 10%.

▪ The risk free rate, , is 5%.

Chapter 5


Optimal investment decisions1
Optimal investment decisions

  • Since the optimal portfolio of the individual investor with average risk aversion, A*, is:

    and the average global investor has z = 1, the risk premium on the market portfolio is proportional to its risk and average degree of risk aversion.

Chapter 5


Application to china
Application to China

The implication of this approach is that Chinese investors will improve their efficient investment frontier by diversifying into foreign securities.

They will increase their return and reduce their risk by international portfolio diversification.

If Chinese investors were to hold one-fifth of their portfolio in foreign assets, there would be a one-time capital outflow of $1.4 trillion, approximately equal to the entire foreign reserve holdings of the People’s Bank of China.

Chapter 5


Summary estimates for china
Summary estimates for China

China, 2006/7

From the standpoint of liberalizing the capital account

in China, large holdings of foreign exchange reserves

are certainly justifiable.

Chapter 5


Conclusion
Conclusion

  • The multinational firm and investor have many decisions involving international borrowing, investing, cash management, mergers and acquisitions, and international business planning.

  • The objective of this chapter is to provide a framework for decision making and financial management of the international business firm.

Chapter 5