making of the modern world week 14 modernism l.
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MAKING OF THE MODERN WORLD WEEK 14 MODERNISM. Paul C é zanne, Melting Snow, Fontainebleau (1879-80). Claude Monet, The Luncheon (1873). Georges Seurat, A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte (1884-86). Pablo Picasso, The Guitar Player (1910).

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Presentation Transcript
slide10

This book cover, published in 1925

by the Hogarth Press, was designed by the painter Vanessa Bell.

In 1904 she moved with her sister

and two brothers to 46 Gordon Square where they started the famous Bloomsbury Group of writers and artists.

slide14

… We affirm that the world’s magnificence has been enriched by a new beauty; the beauty of speed ... We will glorify war–the world’s only hygiene ... We will sing of great crowds excited by work, by pleasure, and by riot; we will sing of the multicoloured, polyphonic tides of revolution in the modern capital. The first ‘Futurist Manifesto’ (1909)

slide23

From about 1880 to the outbreak of World War 1 a series of

sweeping changes in technology created distinctive new modes

of thinking about experiencing time and space. Technological

innovations including the telephone, wireless telegraph, x-ray,

cinema, bicycle, automobile, and airplane, established the material foundation for this reorientation.

Stephen Kern, The Culture of Time and Space, 1880-1918

slide24

Le Corbusier, architect

Unité d’habitation, Berlin; erected 1959

slide26

Photograph showing the Humanities Building c. 1964.

Source: University of Warwick, Modern Records Centre, Warwick University Archive.

Image from the exhibition `The Idea of a University’, Mead Gallery, June 2010.

slide29

Council housing,

South London.

`Fentiman Road/Meadow Road, Lambeth, London, England, 20th century’.