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4 phone etiquette tips to practice when speaking to Hispanic PowerPoint Presentation
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4 phone etiquette tips to practice when speaking to Hispanic

4 phone etiquette tips to practice when speaking to Hispanic

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4 phone etiquette tips to practice when speaking to Hispanic

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  1. 4 phone etiquette tips to practice when speaking to Hispanic consumers It's no secret the Hispanic market represents a huge opportunity for American businesses. With an estimated $1.5 trillion in purchasing power, this market is more important to reach than ever. It is important to remember that the Hispanic community has its own culture and expectations. Relating to and understanding these individuals’ wants and needs is crucial. “Hispanics, from a psychographic standpoint, have stronger belief systems around family, religion, and core cultures.” – Craig Handley, Founder/CEO of Listen Up Español Using proper phone etiquette is one way to gain trust and loyalty from your Hispanic consumers. The first 30 seconds on the phone are imperative. Personalize and disarm. Find a way to connect with the customer to ensure that you get off on the right foot. Approach with energy and enthusiasm, with the end goal being to showcase expertise. Expect more formal conversations Hispanics tend to be more formal when speaking on the phone, especially to someone they don't know. Phrases often used are "Si es tan amable" ("If you please") or "Si no es mucha molestia" ("If it's not too much trouble"). Always be polite In Spanish conversations, you will find yourself asking for permission frequently. "Con permiso" and "¿Me permite?" are popular phrases to obtain another's consent to continue the conversation. “Please” and “thank you” should also be used frequently. Try to avoidusingimperatives. Imperatives are direct orders such as "Bring me water.” This form of speech tends to strike Spanish-speaking people as being pushy or rude. Instead, you should ask for something in a polite way, such as, “¿Me trae agua, por favor?” ("Could you please bring me some water?") This is seen as a respectful request rather than an order. Relationships matter

  2. In Hispanic cultures, people often enjoy buying from friends. It’s important to be relatable and to put your best foot forward to establish a positive rapport and connect with the person on the other end of the line. Marketing to Hispanics must be relationship-building, not just a transaction. Addressing people by their name is preferable to saying “Mr.” or “Ma’am.” Be cordial and down-to-earth – this will go a long way. Get to the bottom line Instead of explaining the features and specifications of the product or service, talk about how it can help customers in their everyday lives. How will this product be beneficial to them specifically? Does it save time and energy? Does it make their lives easier? Focus on these aspects instead of listing product features. Be sincere and don’t be afraid to give an honest answer. If you don’t know the answer, it’s better to respond with “Try it for yourself” instead of “Just trust me.” The bottom line in promoting your business to the Hispanic market is that cultural norms are key. It's not just about a simple translation. The more time you put into relating to your target audience, the more success you will see.