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Career Planning

Career Planning

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Career Planning

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  1. Career Planning Module Number Seven Applied Communication SPCH 1315 Department of English and Communication The University of Texas at Brownsville/Texas Southmost College Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  2. One of the most frequently asked questions on college campuses is “what is your major?” Is your major something that your parents picked for you because it will lead to a successful career after college? Does your major match up with career goals and values? What is a college major? Choosing Your College Major Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  3. A college major is a series of courses that provide a foundation of learning in an academic discipline. Majors vary in the number of courses required. Some students enter college knowing exactly what they want to study, and some have no idea. Nearly two-thirds of undergraduate students in the United States change majors before graduating and might consider up to four or five majors before finally deciding on a major. What Is a College Major? Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  4. Before choosing a major, make a realistic assessment of your interests, skills, and abilities. Be patient. The first year of college is a time of exploration and learning how to succeed in college. During your second year of school you should have a good idea whether your major is a good fit for you. Unfortunately many college students choose a major for the wrong reasons: to please parents, follow their friends, or have a light load. It is your life. Choose the major that feels right to you. Some of the best information in choosing the right major comes from your college - career planning. How Do You Know Whether a Major Is Right for You? Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  5. Making the right career choice is a critical step in the journey of life. Now is a good time to consider different career paths and evaluate your values, interests, abilities, and skills. As you participate in this module, think about how your general interests, career interests and goals align with the courses you are taking and your college major. Choosing a Career Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  6. An important first step in choosing career options is to know your values. Knowing what you value most - what is important to you in life - will help you refine your career search and choice. Clarifying your values helps you zero in on the career that will likely be the most meaningful and rewarding to you. Choose a Career That Matches Your Values Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  7. One of the most commonly used systems for examining the link between personality and career choice was developed by John Holland. Holland believes that there are six basic personality types: realistic, investigative, artistic, social, enterprising, and conventional*. Link Your Personality and Career Choice Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  8. Realistic - prefer to work with objects, machines, tools, plants, or animals. They are often less social, have difficulty in demanding situations, and prefer to work alone. This personality type matches up best with jobs in farming, truck driving, construction, engineering, and being a pilot. Personality and Career Choice (continued) Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  9. Investigative - like to observe, learn, investigate, analyze, evaluate, or solve problems. They are interested in ideas more than people, are indifferent to social relationships, are troubled by emotional situations, and are often aloof and intelligent. This personality type matches up with scientific, intellectually oriented professions. Personality and Career Choice (continued) Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  10. Artistic - have artistic, innovative, or intuitional abilities and like to work in unstructured situations using their imagination and creativity. They enjoy working with ideas and material that allow them to express themselves in innovative ways. They value nonconformity and freedom. Not many jobs match up with the artistic type. Personality and Career Choice (continued) Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  11. Social - like to work with other people to enlighten, inform, help, train or cure them. They tend to have a helping orientation and like doing social things more than intellectual tasks. This personality type matches up with jobs in teaching, social work, and counseling. Personality and Career Choice (continued) Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  12. Enterprising - like to work with people, influencing, persuading, performing, leading or managing for organizational goals or economic gain. They may try to dominate others to reach their goals and are often good at persuading others to do tasks. The enterprising type matches up with jobs in sales, management, and politics. Personality and Career Choice (continued) Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  13. Conventional - like to work with data, have clerical or numerical ability, carry out tasks in detail or follow through on others’ instructions. They function best in well-structured situations and are skilled at working with details. The conventional type matches up with jobs in accounting, banking, and secretarial work. *Most people are a combination of two or three types. Personality and Career Choice (continued) Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  14. Career exploration involves investigating the world of work and becoming knowledgeable about different careers. Think about what type of work you are likely to find rewarding and satisfying. This involves exploring different job opportunities while still in college as well as conducting research to gather information from many different fields, industries, and companies. Explore the “Occupational Outlook Handbook.” Become Knowledge about Careers Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  15. As with exploring potential careers, finding the right job involves doing your homework and becoming as knowledgeable as you can about jobs in which you have a interest. Among the most important things for you to do in your job search are: know what employers want, research the job, network, create a resume and cover letter, and prepare for the interview. Landing a Great Job Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  16. Employers (in a national survey of college students) said that first-year students need to be already thinking about the career they want to pursue. Employers recommend that first-year students focus on obtaining: work-related experience, good grades, computer skills, leadership experience, and participate in campus activities. Know What Employer’s Want Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  17. Research the type of job that you want, identifying the skills and experience necessary to perform it. Determine both the general requirements of the job and the day-to-day tasks and responsibilities. The more you know about the job, the stronger a candidate you will become. Research the Job Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  18. Networking is a valuable tool for learning about jobs (especially unpublished ones). When networking ask for suggestions of people that can be contacted for information about job possibilities. The personal contact gained through networking can enhance your chance of getting a job compared to an anonymous application. Network Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  19. A resume is a clear and concise description of your interests, skills, experiences, and responsibilities in work, service, extracurricular, and academic settings. There should be no errors - misspelled words, grammatical errors, typos, spacing your resume. Your resume must be an accurate reflection of your job history and accomplishments. Lies on your resume will catch up with you. Create a Resume and Cover Letter Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  20. A cover letter introduces you to a potential employer. You should never send a resume to a potential employer without a cover letter. The cover letter briefly describes your qualifications, motivation, and interest in the job. Don’t repeat the information in your resume. Create a Resume and Cover Letter (continued) Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  21. A key step in getting the job you want it to perform well in an interview. Following are strategies for success. Be Prepared - interviewers ask for detailed examples of our past experience. Know your information. Don’t Wing Your Interview- do your homework. Find as much information about your prospective employer as possible. Employers are impressed by applicants who have taken the time to learn about their organization. Interviewing for a Job Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  22. Anticipate What Questions You Will Be Asked - do some practice interviews. Typical questions include “what is your greatest strength?”, what interests you the most about this job?” or “why should I hire you?” Also be prepared for questions that catch you off guard. Example: “tell me something you are very proud of?” Ask Appropriate Job- Related Questions - review the job requirements with the interviewer. Keep Your Cool - always leave in the same polite way you entered. Follow-Up - immediately after the interview, send a follow-up letter. Thank the prospective employer for the opportunity to interview. Interviewing for a Job (continued) Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  23. This self-inventory explores your values and how your values relate to your career pursuits. From the following list, identify those values that you consider important in a career. - Working with people I like - Having peace of mind - Making a lot of money - Being mentally challenged - Not having to work long hours - Being happy - Contributing to the welfare of others - Having self-respect - Having opportunities for advancement - Being creative Self - Inventory One Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  24. - Having plenty time for leisure pursuits - Feeling powerful - Working in a good geographical location - Being self-fulfilled - Working in a setting where moral values are emphasized. - Working in a place where physical and mental health are important. As you explore careers, keep the values in mind that you wrote down. Self - Inventory One (continued) Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  25. This inventory explores your self-management skills. From the list below, identify the qualities you believe you have in terms of self-management skills. Accept supervision Ambitious Intelligent Complete assignments Assertive Loyal Get along with coworkers Cheerful Mature Learn quickly Creative Motivated Get things done on time Dependable Eager Take pride in work Open-minded Optimistic Good attendance Energetic Patient Self - Inventory Two Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  26. Sense of humor Flexible Persistent Hard-working Well-organized Responsible Honest Friendly Self-confident Productive Helpful Sincere Able to coordinate Humble Trustworthy Now go back and look at your list. Identify your top five qualities. Make sure to mention these strengths in future interviews. Self-Inventory Two (continued) Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  27. Sandra is a first-year student at the university whose parents insist she become a nurse. She has declared nursing as her major but she is having second thoughts about majoring in nursing. (She can’t stand the sight of blood). She was actually thinking about becoming a teacher. She has been directed by one of her professor to go to the career center. You are her counselor at the career center. What materials and services would you recommend for her job search? Should she choose her parents’ choice for her or her own. Why or why not? Scenario One Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  28. Congratulations on completing the Career Planning module. You have taken a big step toward managing your time better. Now you need to put what you have learned into practice – by completing the assignment! Congratulations Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk

  29. Career Planning Assignment Created by Julie Larson & Dr. Louis K. Falk Complete the two self inventories. Answer the questions for scenario number one. Bring a typed copy of your completed inventories, as well as your answers to class and be prepared to discuss them.