slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Wisconsin’s Statewide Youth Media Campaign: What Happened After Less Than One Year? PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Wisconsin’s Statewide Youth Media Campaign: What Happened After Less Than One Year?

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 25

Wisconsin’s Statewide Youth Media Campaign: What Happened After Less Than One Year? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 235 Views
  • Uploaded on

Wisconsin’s Statewide Youth Media Campaign: What Happened After Less Than One Year?. University of Wisconsin Monitoring and Evaluation Program Amanda M Riemer Ann Christiansen D. Paul Moberg David Ahrens. Acknowledgements. Monitoring and Evaluation Program Pat Remington, Paul Peppard

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Wisconsin’s Statewide Youth Media Campaign: What Happened After Less Than One Year?' - Leo


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Wisconsin’s Statewide Youth Media Campaign:

What Happened After Less Than One Year?

University of Wisconsin

Monitoring and Evaluation Program

Amanda M Riemer

Ann Christiansen

D. Paul Moberg

David Ahrens

acknowledgements
Acknowledgements
  • Monitoring and Evaluation Program
    • Pat Remington, Paul Peppard
  • Wisconsin Tobacco Control Board
    • David Gunderson, Earnestine Willis
  • BVK
    • Anne Wilbur, Craig Gagnon
  • Market Strategies
    • Darren Maloney
  • Marquette University
    • Craig Andrews
objectives
Objectives
  • To provide you with a framework for assessing short, intermediate and long-term goals associated with a statewide youth media campaign
  • Explore different measures of campaign exposure and their relationships to attitudes, beliefs and behaviors
background
Background
  • In 2001, the Wisconsin Tobacco Control Board allocated $6.5 million for a statewide anti-tobacco, counter-marketing media campaign.
  • Three major focus messages:
    • Secondhand smoke kills
    • Nicotine is addictive/tobacco is deadly
    • Tobacco companies lie
background5

Attitudes

and Beliefs

Behaviors

Awareness

Intentions

Background
  • Model used to evaluate the campaign.
methods overview
Methods - Overview
  • Pretest and Posttest telephone surveys
    • Vendor list of statewide youth (12-18 years old)
    • Oversample of African American youth (12 –18 years old)
variable definitions exposure
Variable Definitions - Exposure

Several different measures of exposure included in the survey

  • SEEN ANY MESSAGE - Y/N
  • UNAIDED MESSAGE RECALL - Y/N
  • HOW MANY MESSAGES - 0,1,2,3,4
  • ANY SPECIFIC ADVERTISEMENTS – Y/N
  • HOW MANY ADVERTISEMENTS – 0,1,2,3,4
  • HOW OFTEN SEE CAMPAIGN – 0-9
variable definitions perceived effectiveness
Variable Definitions – Perceived Effectiveness
  • RATING 0-10

How would you rate the advertisement on a scale of 0 to 10,

  • LIKING 0-10

How much did you like the advertisement?

  • FEELING 0-10

How did the advertisement make you feel about the tobacco industry?

variable definitions attitudes
Variable Definitions – Attitudes

Thirteen anti-tobacco attitudes were combined into one 0 – 3 scale

variable definitions intentions and behaviors
Variable Definitions – Intentions and Behaviors
  • Four measures of intention to start smoking were averaged into a 0 – 3 scale
  • Two measures of smoking behaviors
    • Have you ever tried cigarette smoking, even one or two puffs?
      • Yes/No
    • During the past thirty days, on how many days did you smoke cigarettes?
      • >0 - Smoker = 1;
      • 0 - Smoker = 0.
slide15

Results- Beliefs and attitudes related to campaign messages

  • Indexed scale (0-3) of all thirteen attitudes and beliefs
    • Pretest mean – 2.21
    • Posttest mean – 2.27
slide21

Limitations

  • Two cross sectional surveys used to measure change.
    • Weak evaluation design
    • Will continue to monitor progress with data from coming years to strengthen design
  • Youth data have limited generalizability because sample was from vendor list vs. random digit dial.
  • Changes may be attributable to other tobacco control efforts in the state, as well as counter efforts by the tobacco industry.
slide22

Results – Relationships between media exposure

  • Measures of campaign exposure were associated with stronger anti-tobacco sentiments at the posttest.
  • Only perceived effectiveness of advertisements is associated with youth intentions to start smoking and trying a puff of cigarette
  • Youth smoking was associated with measures of campaign message awareness, and with perceived effectiveness
slide23

Results – overall pretest

to posttest change

  • Youth advertisement exposure and youth agreement with anti-tobacco attitudes and beliefs increased from pretest to posttest
  • Youth intentions to start smoking and the proportion who had ever tried even a puff was slightly, but significantly lower at the posttest
slide24

Recommendations

  • History has shown that a sustained youth media campaign is an integral part of any comprehensive tobacco control program
  • Our data suggest that repeated exposure to a wide range of messages and advertisements tends to have the greatest impact on youth attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors
trailer slide
Trailer slide
  • 24 slides x 1 set = 24 slides
  • Monitoring and Evaluation (WTCB)
  • Erich Mussak 265-9931
  • Set 3 of 3 in order.