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Latin Christendom Timeline. 476 “Fall” of the Roman Empire 400+ Irish monks preserve knowledge 400+ Decline of urban population 622+ Muslim Expansion 732 Defeat of Muslims at Tours 800 Charlemagne crowned “Emperor of the Romans” by Pope 843 Treaty of Verdun. LATIN CHRISTENDOM.

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latin christendom timeline
Latin Christendom Timeline
  • 476 “Fall” of the Roman Empire
  • 400+ Irish monks preserve knowledge
  • 400+ Decline of urban population
  • 622+ Muslim Expansion
  • 732 Defeat of Muslims at Tours
  • 800 Charlemagne crowned “Emperor of the Romans” by Pope
  • 843 Treaty of Verdun
main points
Main Points
  • Post Roman Western Europe
  • Christianity and Monasticism
  • Germanic Culture
  • Merovingians
  • Carolingians & Charlemagne
i post roman western europe
I. Post Roman Western Europe
  • Political instability
    • Multiple kingdoms
    • Incessant wars
    • Inability to regulate royal succession
    • Rivalries
i post roman western europe6
I. Post Roman Western Europe
  • Economic disintegration
    • Land passed out of cultivation
    • Coinage system broke down
    • Urban population shrinks
    • Trade declines
      • Bandits on roads
      • Rivers are main communication source
i post roman western europe7
I. Post Roman Western Europe
  • Total population declines
    • birthrate, marriage age
    • disease 560-750 series of plagues
i post roman western europe8
I. Post Roman Western Europe
  • Germanic tribes rule Rome
  • Ostrogoths rule from 476
    • dualistic government
    • preservation of classical knowledge
    • Arianism vs. Catholicism
  • Spain
    • controlled by the Visigoths
    • fused with existing power structure
    • rule until 711 - Muslim conquest.
i post roman western europe10
I. Post Roman Western Europe
  • North Africa
    • Vandals conquer and rule until 5th century
    • were Arians - persecuted Catholics
    • vanished when conquered by Justinian
  • Impact of Eastern Roman Empire
    • destroyed power of Ostrogoths, led to further dissolution of political authority in Italy (N & S)
    • destroyed Vandals
    • weakened Visigoths.
ii christianity and monasticism
II. Christianity and Monasticism
  • Christianity spreads to Germany
  • different types of holy men
    • hermits, cenobites, vagrants
  • relics.
ii christianity and monasticism13
II. Christianity and Monasticism
  • Pope Gregory I
    • Christianity centralizes its authority
      • Bishop of Rome vs. all other Western bishops
    • The Gregorian chant
    • Encouraged the Benedictine rule in all monasteries
  • Saint Benedict of Nursia (480-547)
    • Arise because of “impurity” of other monks
    • regimented day
    • Necessity of penance
ii christianity and monasticism14
II. Christianity and Monasticism
  • unsettled times increase appeal of monasticism
  • role of monasteries in early middle ages
    • Christianize countryside
    • learning - Irish Monks
    • safety
    • economic (beer).
iii germanic culture
III. Germanic Culture
  • Northern Europe
    • Beowulf

What does this tell us about this society?

iv merovingians
IV. Merovingians
  • Clovis (reigned 481-511)
    • defeated last Roman outpost
    • married Clothilde and converts to Catholicism in 506
    • ruled in conjunction with Romano-Gallic nobility

– preserved some of the Roman system

by end of the 600’s fusion of German and Roman ideas of kingship and law.

v carolingians charlemagne
V. Carolingians & Charlemagne
  • The reign of Charlemagne (742–814, r. 768–814)
    • United the Frankish Kingdom through armed expeditions
      • Forcing conversion to Christianity
    • Counts and local administration
      • Administration of justice
      • Courts, tolls, and taxation
      • New coinage system
v carolingians charlemagne21
V. Carolingians & Charlemagne
  • Can be seen many different ways
    • major Frankish king, restorer of the Roman Empire, Christian saint, mythic figure of French Romance, descendant of Charles Martel (Tours)
  • Expansion of empire
    • Saxons 772-804, Spain, Italy, Slavs.
v carolingians charlemagne23
V. Carolingians & Charlemagne
  • Christianity and kingship
    • Kingship regarded as a divine office created by God to protect the church
    • Religious reforms
      • Changed liturgy of Frankish church
      • Reformed rules of worship
      • Prohibited pagan observances
    • Spiritual responsibilities of kingship: the protector of the papacy
v carolingians charlemagne24
V. Carolingians & Charlemagne
  • Coronation on Christmas Day 800
v carolingians charlemagne27
V. Carolingians & Charlemagne
  • Renaissance
    • Reformation of law codes
    • celebration of learning
    • support of churches
v carolingians charlemagne28
V. Carolingians & Charlemagne
  • Aftermath
    • end of booty
    • ephemeral nature of kingdom
    • new invasions
    • Verdun 843 divides empire..