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Production Estimates and Crop Assessment Division Foreign Agricultural Service, USDA Florida – Hurricanes August/September 2004 For more information, contact Carl Gernazio gernazio@fas.usda.gov 202-690-0136 FFAS - Center for Remote Sensing Analysis PECAD Track of Charley – WAOB map

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florida hurricanes august september 2004

Production Estimates and Crop Assessment Division

Foreign Agricultural Service, USDA

Florida – Hurricanes August/September 2004

For more information, contact Carl Gernazio

gernazio@fas.usda.gov

202-690-0136

FFAS - Center for Remote Sensing Analysis

PECAD

florida crop weather summarized from report by usda nass released august 17 2004
Florida Crop WeatherSummarized from report by USDA-NASSReleased – August 17, 2004

Weather Summary Report: Tropical Storm Bonnie and Hurricane Charley both hit the State during the week of August 9 – 15. Bonnie formed in the Gulf of Mexico and brought major precipitation to the Panhandle on August 11. On August 13, Hurricane Charley plowed a destructive swath across the Peninsula from Port Charlotte to Daytona Beach causing very extensive damage due to hurricane force winds and heavy rains. Heavy rainfall was reported in stations all across the Panhandle and the Central Peninsula, with over six inches reported in Apopka, Avalon, Daytona Beach, Madison, Jefferson, and Santa Rosa. Temperatures were normal in Miami as well as West Palm Beach, whereas other major cities were one to three degrees below normal. Pensacola reported five degrees below normal. Daytime highs were in the upper 80s and lower 90s. Nighttime lows were in the high 60s and low 70s.

Field Crop Reports: Wet conditions may delay the first digging of peanuts, expected by the end of the week to early next week. Tobacco yield, as well as the quality, is poor due to diseases. Since much of central and northern Florida was trending dry, the heavy rainfall was mostly welcomed news for cotton and peanuts. Moisture also improved hay fields, which were becoming too dry.

Vegetable Report: Heavy rains delayed some fall field preparations, especially in the southern Peninsula.

Livestock Report: Pasture conditions vary from fair to excellent. Moisture improved pasture conditions statewide.

Citrus Report: Hurricane Charley passed directly through three major citrus producing counties on Friday causing extensive damage and loss to trees and green fruit on either side of the hurricane’s path. The storm, with winds measuring up to 100 mph in a tight pattern around the eye, passed directly through DeSoto, Hardee, Polk, Orange, and Seminole counties. Reports indicate pushed over trees, broken limbs, and green fruit on the ground in many areas. Assessments of loss will follow, when NASS can get out into the growing areas. Growers are not able to enter some groves at this time because of blocked roads and standing water.

nass citrus prod map with charley track pecad
NASS Citrus Prod. Map – with Charley Track - PECAD

The area shaded red accounted for

just under 52 percent of last year’s

citrus production.

Hurricane Charley

Sustained Wind-speed

Winds – 85 to 140 mph.

Winds – 39 to 73 mph.

florida noaa 15 july 6 2004
Florida – NOAA 15, July 6, 2004

FFAS Center for

Remote Sensing

Analysis

NOAA 15, Ch. 2,1,1 = R,G,B

July 6, 2004

florida noaa 15 august 17 2004
Florida – NOAA 15, August 17, 2004

FFAS Center for

Remote Sensing

Analysis

NOAA 15, Ch. 2,1,1 = R,G,B

August 17, 2004

noaa 15 charley pre landfall august 13 2004
NOAA 15, Charley, pre-landfall August 13, 2004

FFAS Center for

Remote Sensing

Analysis

Arrow points to the eye of Charley,

Friday morning.

NOAA 15, Ch. 2,1,1 = R,G,B

August 13, 2004

noaa 15 florida comparing july 6 to august 17 2004
NOAA 15, Florida – Comparing July 6 to August 17, 2004

NOAA 15, Ch. 2,1,1 = R,G,B

July 6, 2004

NOAA 15, Ch. 2,1,1 = R,G,B

August 17, 2004

FFAS Center for

Remote Sensing

Analysis

noaa 15 charley morning august 14 2004

Charley

NOAA 15 – Charley – Morning August 14. 2004

Charley was well on his way north

by 7:00 am Saturday morning, about to make

landfall again in South Carolina.

FFAS Center for

Remote Sensing

Analysis

NOAA 15, Ch. 2,1,1 = R,G,B

August 14, 2004

24 hour precipitation mm
24 Hour Precipitation (mm)

Bonnie and a Stationary Front

August 13, 2004

As of 5:00 am

Charlie and a Stationary Front

August 14, 2004

As of 5:00 am

Charlie and a Stationary Front

August 15, 2004

As of 5:00 am

Climate Prediction

Center

ne charlotte county florida
NE – Charlotte County, Florida

Wet

fields

FFAS Center for

Remote Sensing

Analysis

Landsat 7, Ch. 4,5,3 = R,G,B

August 17, 2004

Citrus

ne charlotte county florida13
NE – Charlotte County, Florida

Map of approximately the

same area as the Landsat

scene. More images and

analysis will follow.

FFAS Center for

Remote Sensing

Analysis

Citrus

landsat 5 before and after
Landsat 5 – Before and After

Before Charley – July 24, 2004

After Charley – August 25, 2004

FFAS Center for

Remote Sensing

Analysis

Landsat 5, Ch. 4,5,3 = R,G,B

peace river hardee county florida
Peace River – Hardee County, Florida

Peace River

Peace River

Before Charley – July 24, 2004

After Charley – August 25, 2004

FFAS Center for

Remote Sensing

Analysis

Landsat 5, Ch. 4,5,3 = R,G,B

peace river de soto county florida
Peace River – De Soto County, Florida

Horse Creek

Horse Creek

Peace River

Peace River

Before Charley – July 24, 2004

After Charley – August 25, 2004

FFAS Center for

Remote Sensing

Analysis

Landsat 5, Ch. 4,5,3 = R,G,B

a spot scene southwest florida
A SPOT Scene – Southwest Florida

After Charley – August 16, 2004

Charlotte County border is in dark

blue. The area shown in the

next scene is highlighted in

light blue.

FFAS Center for

Remote Sensing

Analysis

SPOT 4, Mid_IR, Wide-IR, Red Channels

a spot scene southwest florida18
A SPOT Scene – Southwest Florida

FFAS Center for

Remote Sensing

Analysis

SPOT 4, Mid_IR, Wide-IR, Red Channels

quickbird march 23 2004 oceanside
QuickBird – March 23, 2004Oceanside

Digital Globe – QuickBird March 23, 2004 – Oceanside Punta Gorda, Florida

quickbird august 14 2004 oceanside
QuickBird – August 14, 2004Oceanside

Digital Globe – QuickBird August 14, 2004 – Oceanside Punta Gorda, Florida

quickbird march 23 2004 mobile home park
QuickBird – March 23, 2004Mobile Home Park

Digital Globe – QuickBird March 23, 2004 – Mobile Home Park, Punta Gorda, Florida

quickbird august 14 2004 mobile home park
QuickBird – August 14, 2004Mobile Home Park

Digital Globe – QuickBird August 14, 2004 – “Mobile Home Park”, Punta Gorda, Florida

noaa 17 frances post landfall september 5 2004
NOAA 17, Frances, post-landfall September 5, 2004

Hurricane Frances a few hours after landfall.

NOAA 17, Ch. 2,1,1 = R,G,B

September 5, 2004

FFAS Center for

Remote Sensing

Analysis

florida crop weather released september 7 2004 florida ag statistics service
Florida Crop WeatherReleased September 7, 2004 – Florida Ag. Statistics Service

Weather Summary Report

Rain totals in the major cities for the week of August 29through September 4 ranged from less than half an inch at Orlando to over nine inches at West Palm Beach. Temperatures in the major cities hovered within two degrees of normal with daytime highs in the 80s and 90s and night time lows in the 60s and 70s. Post Hurricane Frances preliminary rain totals for seven days ending on Labor Day were eight to twelve inches inmost southeastern Peninsula counties, four to twelve inches in some inland central Peninsula counties, one to eight inches over the northwest Peninsula and one to four inches in the Panhandle. A few localities in the Panhandle and a large portion of Miami-Dade County did not receive any rain from Hurricane Frances. Strong winds tossed crops and heavy rains flooded fields in areas affected by the storm.

Field Crops Report

In Washington County, corn harvesting is ahead of schedule. Peanuts, cotton, as well as soybeans needed some precipitation prior to the hurricane. Peanuts, statewide, were rated one percent poor, 23 percent fair, 55 percent good and 21 percent excellent. Producers in Madison County increased peanut digging due to the anticipation of prolonged wet weather. Wet fields are delaying some peanut harvesting over the northern Peninsula and Panhandle. Topsoil and subsoil moisture were mostly adequate to surplus, and a few localities in the Panhandle and northern Peninsula reported short to very short moisture supplies prior to the storm. Storm damage to peanuts and cotton is currently being assessed with early reports showing only limited damage over the Panhandle. Acreage in the far western Panhandle suffered no effects from the storm.

Vegetable Report

Strong winds tossed plastic laid for fall crop planting and tattered leaves on crops planted earlier in some southern Peninsula areas with most acreage expected to recover. Growers in East Coast areas are currently assessing damages with some losses expected. Wind-borne sandblasted immature fruit in some older fields. Some producers are delaying planting to avoid possible damage from another tropical system while a few others may not plant fall crops. Some producers sprayed plants for disease control after the hurricane passed. Most acreage in Miami-Dade County escaped damage from Hurricane Frances with okra harvesting very active prior to the storm.

florida crop weather released september 7 2004 florida ag statistics service page 2
Florida Crop WeatherReleased September 7, 2004 – Florida Ag. Statistics ServicePage 2.

Fruit Report

Citrus: For the second time in nearly three weeks, a strong hurricane crossed the state affecting citrus growing areas; this time, causing major loss to grapefruit. Hurricane Frances entered the state on the east coast near Stuart and moved west northwest through St. Lucie, Okeechobee, central Polk and Hillsborough counties, and exited the State north of Tampa. The paths of the two storms crossed just south of Alturas in south central Polk County. Winds up to and exceeding 100 mph were experienced in all areas of the east coast from north Volusia to Palm Beach counties. The wind gusts extended inland enough to affect most citrus in all the east coast counties. Reports are very preliminary but indicate more fruit loss on grapefruit than oranges with limited tree mortality. Heavy rainfall has left high water in many groves and ditches, and a high priority is being placed on moving this water away from tree roots. As the hurricane moved through other areas of the State, it remained strong but winds diminished as it moved further west and north. Groves hard hit from Hurricane Charley continue to drop fruit as growers assess damage and move downed trees to provide access to groves. Cultural practices continue in unaffected areas including fertilizations, hedging, mechanical and chemical weed control and the resetting of young trees.

Livestock Report

All areas have some flooded pastures. Heavy rain and high winds from Hurricane Francis damaged some dairies in the Panhandle and in the southeastern and central Peninsula. Power outages have delayed milking on some dairies in the hurricane's path. Scheduled milk pickup was disrupted by weather problems at some plants. Pasture conditions Statewide before the hurricane, were mostly good. Statewide, most of the cattle are in good condition.

florida crop weather released september 13 2004 florida ag statistics service
Florida Crop WeatherReleased September 13, 2004 – Florida Ag. Statistics Service

Weather Summary Report

Rain bands crossed the Peninsula as Hurricane Frances moved northward during the week of September 6 through 12, causing substantial flood damage in many areas. Significant rainfall at the major stations ranged from no precipitation at Pensacola to over twelve inches at Marion; however, some localities may have received more than the “official” recorded amount. Temperatures for the week averaged from two degrees below to two degrees above normal at the major stations. Daytime highs were in the upper 80s and lower 90s. Nighttime lows were in the high 60s and low 70s.

Field Crops Report

Soil moisture supplies in the Panhandle and southern Peninsula are short to adequate while central and northern Peninsula moisture is adequate to surplus. In Jefferson County, limb breakage and uprooted trees have left much of the remaining pecan crop lost. Producers in Leon County report there will be a shortage in hay supplies this winter. Cotton is maturing rapidly in Santa Rosa County with some early planted fields nearing defoliation time. Peanuts are in good to excellent condition. Clearer conditions allowed peanut producers to rapidly advance harvesting with 20 percent of the crop dug. Twelve percent of the peanuts were harvested by this date last year.

Vegetable Report

Okra harvesting is active in Dade County. Fall field preparations for vegetables continue in southern and central Peninsula localities although rainfall delayed many activities. Some growers lost plastic ground cover and some new plants due to the hurricane winds and rain.

Livestock Report

In the Panhandle, pastures and hay fields look good. There is some concern that hay supplies will be short this winter. In the Big Bend, central and southwest areas, low spots in pastures are flooded from Hurricane Frances. Most pastures on the east coast and across the lower Peninsula are saturated and some are completely under water. Statewide, the condition of the cattle decreased significantly

Page 1 of 2

florida crop weather released september 13 2004 florida ag statistics service31
Florida Crop WeatherReleased September 13, 2004 – Florida Ag. Statistics Service

Fruit Report

Citrus: Unstable weather conditions occurred over the State following the passage of Hurricane Frances on Sunday the 5th with rainfall amounts variable. Hot temperatures returned with high humidity levels. Slow moving, heavy thunderstorms developed over wide areas with coastal and many interior areas receiving heavy rains on several days. Lakes and rivers are at their highest levels in many months. Growers continue to report many trees blown over or broken from both hurricanes in the interior counties and in the east coast counties. Groves hard hit from both hurricanes continue to drop fruit as growers assess damage and move downed trees to provide access to groves. Growers are trying to move excess water from groves as quickly as possible. Summer sprays are being applied to crops designated for fresh use as rainfall permits.

Page 2 of 2

florida department of citrus september 9 2004 statement on hurricane frances
Florida Department of Citrus – September 9, 2004 Statement on Hurricane Frances

Three weeks after Hurricane Charley pounded Florida’s Gulf coast, another powerful hurricane has slammed into Florida’s east coast. Our hearts go out to all of our fellow Floridians who have been affected by these storms. 

Hurricane Frances has compounded the dire situation left in Charley’s wake and devastated the homes and livelihoods of many more Floridians, including Florida’s citrus growers. Although it is too early to tell the extent of the damage, we know that many grapefruit and orange growers have been affected.  The Florida Department of Citrus is working with other state, federal and industry associations on behalf of the citrus growers to take the necessary steps to help rebuild Florida’s citrus industry and help the state recover. 

St. Lucie, Martin, Indian River and Palm Beach counties, all citrus producing counties, were hit hardest. These counties account for almost 200,000 acres of Florida citrus production – nearly 80,000 acres of grapefruit production (the equivalent of 73 percent of the grapefruit crop) and approximately 112,000 acres of orange production (the equivalent of 17 percent of the orange crop).  St. Lucie and Indian River grow the bulk of the total. 

While it’s too early to know the exact damage at this point, we know a lot of this year’s orange and grapefruit crops have been lost because of the storms.

The Florida Department of Citrus is an executive agency of the Florida government charged with the marketing, research and regulation of the Florida citrus industry.  Florida is one of the world’s leading producers of oranges, grapefruits and specialty citrus fruits, with more than 95 percent of Florida oranges processed into orange juice.  The industry employs 90,000 Floridians and provides a $9 billion annual economic impact to the state.

For more information, contact Andrew Meadows at (863)499-2516.