section 11 food safety ch 14
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Section 11: Food Safety (CH 14)

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 29

Section 11: Food Safety (CH 14) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 248 Views
  • Uploaded on

HNU 200. Section 11: Food Safety (CH 14). 11.3. preventing food-borne illness. HNU 200. Section 11: Food Safety (CH 14). Special Concerns with Produce. Reason for concern: Exposed to mo’s during growth Can be eaten raw Limited number of control practices

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Section 11: Food Safety (CH 14)' - Jeffrey


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
section 11 food safety ch 14
HNU 200

Section 11: Food Safety (CH 14)

11 3 preventing food borne illness

11.3. preventingfood-borne illness

HNU 200

Section 11: Food Safety (CH 14)

special concerns with produce
Special Concerns with Produce
  • Reason for concern:
    • Exposed to mo’s during growth
    • Can be eaten raw
    • Limited number of control practices
  • Sources of contamination: soil, water, equipment, humans, animals, manure, unsanitary processing methods, by consumer
  • Common mo’s: Salmonella, Shigella, E. coli O157, hepatitis A, noroviruses, Cyclospora, and Cryptosporidium
special concerns with animal products
Special Concerns with Animal Products
  • Reason for concern:
    • Naturally contain mo’s
    • Risk of cross contamination to other animal products and produce
    • Processing of products: grinding
    • Ready to eat foods: not handled safely
  • Sources of contamination: naturally occurring mo’s, feces, unsanitary processing methods, processing equipment, cross contamination, by consumer
  • Common mo’s: Salmonella, parasites, Campylobacter, E. coli, Listeria, Norwalk
step 1 check
Step 1: Check
  • Non bruised/cut/moldy produce
    • Leafy Greens:
      • Selection: Look for leaves that are crisp
  • Pre-cut/packaged produce should be kept cool at store
  • Check for best before dates
  • Look at appearance, smell
step 2 clean
Step 2: Clean
  • Hands: wash with warm water and soap for at least 20 seconds before and after handling foods
    • Before and after handling food
    • After using bathroom, coughing, sneezing, blowing nose, changing diaperr
    • After touching animals/pets
    • After touching skin
step 2 clean7
Step 2: Clean
  • Produce: unless pre-washed, under tap water, rub firm skinned produce or scrub with brush
  • Surfaces and utensils: hot water and soap, including cutting boards, counter tops
    • Be aware: what do you clean surfaces with?
step 2 clean8
Step 2: Clean
  • Surface cleaning tip:
    • 1 tsp liquid bleach/quart water
    • Flood surface with mixture
    • Let stand few mins
    • Wipe up
  • Never use bleach to clean food
step 3 separate
Step 3: Separate
  • Separate fresh produce from raw meats/fish/poultry (MFP) during:
  • Shopping: in cart, bags, at checkout
  • Storage: in fridge
  • Preparation: on plates, cutting boards; use new utensils
step 3 separate10
Step 3: Separate
  • Watch MFP juices
  • Separate: fresh produce from MFP and their juices
  • Seal: MFP when storing
  • Boil: don’t use MFP marinades on cooked food unless you boil them first
  • Clean: clean up juice spills (even in fridge and on floor)
step 4 cook
Step 4: Cook
  • Cooking temperatures: cook to proper internal temp (see next page)
  • Holding temperatures: keep hot foods hot, and cold food cold
    • Buffet style: keep hot foods at 140F or higher
    • Transporting foods: thermos/insulated containers to keep hot
step 5 chill
Step 5: Chill
  • Temperature guide:
    • Fridge: 1 - 4o C (34 – 40o F)
    • Freezer: below 0o C (32o F)
    • Danger zone for bacterial growth: 4 – 60o C (40 – 140o F)
  • Refrigerate or freeze: leftovers, perishables, within 2 hours of purchase or use; within 1 hr if temp of product > 90o F
  • Divide: large amounts of food into small containers for quick cooling
step 5 chill16
Step 5: Chill
  • Storage: don’t fill up freezer or fridge too much
  • Thawing Do’s:
    • Refrigerator: safest
    • Cold water : either running, or change every 30 min
    • Microwave: only if going to use immediately
  • Thawing Don’ts:
    • Thaw at room temp
    • Thaw in warm/hot water
step 5 chill17
Step 5: Chill
  • Transportation: keep cold foods cold
    • Use ice packs/insulated containers
    • Chill until serving
    • Doggy bag: refrigerate/freeze within 2 hrs
  • Length of storage: see next slides
step 6 throw away
Step 6: Throw Away
  • Throw out fresh produce:
    • That has not been refrigerated within two hours of cutting, peeling, or cooking
    • That is bruised or damaged
    • That has touched raw meat, poultry or seafood
  • If in doubt, throw it out!
preventing food borne illness
When eating out:

Eat at restaurants that look clean

Insist that food be cooked thoroughly

When travelling:

Avoid raw foods, salads, uncooked fruits and vegetables, unpasteurized milk

Only drink bottled water or soda, boiled water such as tea, beer, wine

Preventing Food-Borne Illness
references
References
  • Brown, J.E. (2005). Nutrition Now. 4th ed. USA: Thomson Wadsworth.
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency. (2009). Certain Maple Leaf, Shopsy’s, and Hygrade brand wieners may contain Listeria monocytogenes. Retrieved Nov. 25, 2009, from http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2009/20090803e.shtml#photos
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency. (2008). Meat products produced at establishment 97B may contain Listeria monocytogenes. Retrieved Nov. 25, 2009, from http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2008/list97be.shtml
references28
References
  • Health Canada. (2009). Food-related illness. Retrieved Nov. 25, 2009, from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/securit/ill-intox/index-eng.php
  • Health Canada. (2008). Listeria and food safety. Retrieved Nov. 25, 2009, from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hl-vs/iyh-vsv/food-aliment/listeria-eng.php
  • Nova Scotia Department of Agriculture. (2009). Food inspection and enforcement division. Retrieved Nov. 25, 2009 from https://www.gov.ns.ca/agri/foodsafety/index.shtml
references29
References
  • Partnership for Food Safety Education. (2006). Fight Bac. Retrieved Nov. 28, 2009, from http://www.fightbac.org
  • Prescott, L.M., Harley, J.P., and Klein, D.A. (2002). Microbiology. 5th ed. New York:McGraw Hill.
ad