slide1 l.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Neighbourhood policing in a railway context PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Neighbourhood policing in a railway context

Loading in 2 Seconds...

  share
play fullscreen
1 / 22
Download Presentation

Neighbourhood policing in a railway context - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

JasminFlorian
255 Views
Download Presentation

Neighbourhood policing in a railway context

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Neighbourhood policing in a railway context National Community Safety Network 14th conference June 10-11, 2009 Supt Paul Brogden (Crime and Neighbourhood Policing) British Transport Police Sue Nelson, Community Safety Partnerships Ltd

  2. Background • National police force for Britain’s railways • Safer station, safer journey philosophy • Working in partnership to build a safer railway environment free from disruption and fear of crime • 2,835 police officers and 1,455 support staff • Policing 6 million passenger journeys a day over 10,000 miles of track and at 2,500 stations • Also police • London Underground • Docklands Light Railway • Channel Tunnel Rail Link • Croydon Tramlink • Railway arches/land

  3. BTP Area map • 7 areas - • Scotland • North Western • North Eastern • Wales & Western • London North • London South • London & DLR

  4. BTP engagement structure • Assistant Chief Constable Operations maintains Government Office (GO) overview and strategic input to industry • Area Commanders link with GO Regional Crime Directors, plus LSPs • Sector commanders link with CDRPs and local industry groups • Officers in Charge and NPTs link with ward teams, community forums and CDRP sub-groups

  5. London North area • 678 staff • 19 train operating companies • 5 major London stations • Paddington, Euston, King’s Cross, St Pancras, Liverpool Street • 19 Met Police boroughs • 90 CDRPs • 52 LSPs • Olympics/Stratford

  6. Policing Pledge • Neighbourhood policing teams now 72 in number and growing • Central to railway policing agenda • Agree local plans with partners • Sharing of crime mapping data • London borough hotspots

  7. Neighbourhood policing teams • Defined teams with geographic responsibilities • Station hubs and/or line of route • Core principles • Visibility (meaningful numbers) • Engagement (industry and public) • Reassurance – perceptions of safety • PACT meetings • KIN data • Problem Solving Plans

  8. Engagement challenges (1) • Stations are gateways into wider communities as well as gateway to railway • Railway often seen as background feature of communities where people live and work • Home Office force NPT versus BTP? • Railway is linear and passes through neighbourhoods each with own territorial resources • Transcend local authority and policing boundaries • Has to be relationship between railway and elsewhere if seamless service to communities is to be provided

  9. Engagement challenges (2) • Good relationships with industry partners • But how do we engage better with the wider community? • Reviewed activity • Set challenges around customer engagement • Assisted NPT sergeants in developing awareness of wider community • Highlight existing activity – SNTs etc.

  10. Findings • Industry engagement has to be be strong in the first place to develop relationships outside • Broaden geographic footprint beyond station/railway boundary • Our criminals are your criminals • Problem solving to root cause • Public want to engage!

  11. Case study:Euston NPT • Longer term problem-solving approach using variety of key stakeholders • Not just industry ones! • Clear understanding of wider community issues • Truancy patrols to tackle ASB at Euston • Prescription drug addicts • Shopwatch

  12. Would you say you feel more or less safe in this area than you did 12 months ago

  13. How do you feel walking alone in the station during the day?

  14. On average how often do you see a uniformed police presence on foot in this station

  15. How do you feel walking alone in the station after dark?

  16. Have you noticed any change in police presence over the past 12 months

  17. Police interaction How important do you think it is for people in this station to know a local police officer How well informed do you feel about what the BTP have been doing at this station In the last 12 months have you…….

  18. Would you be willing to be involved with your local BTP around issues you face here

  19. Benefits to date (1) • Industry engagement through PACT forums • Links outside • Joint operations with Safer Neighbourhood Teams • Dialogue with CDRPs and local authorities • Residents’ groups/community organisations • Teams are maturing and growing in confidence • More ambitious • Open to challenges

  20. Benefits (2) • Crime on rail network fell by 4.5% in 2008/9 • Reduced for fifth consecutive year • Robbery down 16% • Violent crime down 2% • BTP achieved 11 out of 11 of national operational targets

  21. The future • Increasing local engagement through community safety structures • Belief in neighbourhood policing reflected in the data • More neighbourhood policing teams being rolled out across the network • Neighbourhood policing is core to BTP activity • Affects general public, not just railway businesses, rail staff, rail users

  22. QuestionsContact details • Supt Paul Brogden, British Transport Police • paul.brogden@btp.pnn.police.uk • 020 7391 8292 • Sue Nelson, Community Safety Partnerships Ltd • suenelson@comsafetypartners.com • 01904 448 439