Competency standard: Unit THHBFB11B Develop & update food and beverage knowledge - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Competency standard: Unit THHBFB11B Develop & update food and beverage knowledge
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Competency standard: Unit THHBFB11B Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

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  1. Competency standard:Unit THHBFB11BDevelop & update food and beverage knowledge

  2. Unit Descriptor • This unit deals with the skills and knowledge required to develop and maintain the general product knowledge required by food and beverage attendants. It brings together much of the product knowledge that underpins effective work performance in a range of food service roles and relates to food knowledge and the relationships between different foods and beverages. The unit also focuses on the need for ongoing updating of knowledge by all food and beverage staff. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  3. Unit Descriptor • Please note that the specific product knowledge that applies to those mainly involved in beverage service Is found in other units such as unit THHBFB04B Provide table service of alcoholic beverages and THHBFB01B B Operate a bar. There are also two other higher level units which deal with specialised food and beverage knowledge. These are THHADFB02B Provide specialist advice on wine and THHADFB01 B Provide specialist advice on food. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  4. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Performance Criteria 1.1 Identify the Information required in order to fulfil daily activities associated with the job role 1.2 Identify suitable sources of the required information on food and beverage 1.3 Develop and maintain current knowledge of food and beverage as required for the job role. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  5. Element 2: Share information with customers Performance Criteria 2.1 Provide assistance to customers on selection of food and beverage Items 2.2 Offer advice on suitable combinations of food and beverages where appropriate 2.3 Respond courteously and correctly to customer questions on menus and drinks lists 2.4 Provide advice on menu Items In response to special dietary or cultural requirements of customers. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  6. Essential knowledge and skills to be assessed The following skills and knowledge must be assessed as part of this unit: • the features of commonly prepared dishes as appropriate to the industry sector • traditional accompaniments for different types of food • service styles for different types of food • compatibility of common food and beverage items • specific food safety issues for different types of food • common cultural and dietary issues and options • general overview of special dietary requirements, including food exclusions for allergies and food Intolerance Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  7. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage 1.1 Identify information required It Is vital for every hospitality employee to have an excellent knowledge of the products and services offered by their workplace. In particular, you need this knowledge so you can take every opportunity to promote dishes, recommend beverages and generally assist customers. Opportunities to promote products frequently arise during service sessions, and elsewhere in the general hospitality environment. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  8. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage These opportunities mainly occur when taking orders, and present an excellent opportunity to show-off your skills, as well as to inform the customer of the various products or services offered by your place of work. Knowledge about food, beverages, the services you offer and the facilities available is called 'product knowledge', and you can't have too much of it! Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  9. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Information to assist in fulfilling daily duties Waiters and bar attendants, because of their roles, will have greater focus in different areas. Waiters One of the more immediate ways for you to acquire food product knowledge is to refer to the menus being used. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  10. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage • If you are unsure about any of the listed items, the terms used or the cooking methods mentioned, you should ask the kitchen: the first time you do this, you may have quite a few questions you want answered (and this is normal), so it may pay you to make an appointment with whoever can help you. • To get a broader up-to-date knowledge of the food products currently available on the market, along with various recipes and cooking methods, you should start developing an interest in books and magazines that feature these things. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  11. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage In addition, you'll have to equip yourself with beverage knowledge, because part of your role will at sometime Involve you In taking orders for, preparing and serving beverages. A good knowledge of wines is also useful. Bar Attendants Bar attendants deal with a wide range of products, so It is important you become familiar with all the different beverage tastes, styles and qualities. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  12. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage It is also useful to have accurate knowledge about Ingredients and production methods, as well as a little product history (such as place of origin). Beer The term 'beer' relates to all the fermented liquors from malted and unmalted cereals. It includes ales, lagers, pilseners, porters and stouts. Beer is said to be one of the oldest drinks dating back around 5,000 years, to the ancient Egyptians. Around the 15th century, hops were Introduced from Germany, and these hops helped prevent the ale from souring. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  13. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  14. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage The original distinction between ale and beer was that ale contained no hops. Today, the difference is between ale and lager, not ale and beer. This is because of the brewing methods: ales are 'top fermented', while lagers are 'bottom fermented'. Fermentation depends on the strain of yeast used, and some yeasts rise and others sink during the fermentation process. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  15. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage The process of making beer is broken down into five areas: • malting • mashing • hopping • fermentation • Pasteurisation. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  16. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  17. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Colour, body and flavour of beer The colour, body and flavour of beer will largely depend on the kind of malts, grains, hops and water used. It will also depend on whether top or bottom fermenting yeasts were used, the temperature of the fermentation, and the handling duration of the beer prior to packaging. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  18. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Lager styles Yeast cultures that ferment at the bottom of a vessel can be isolated and removed. This means that lager beers are usually a cleaner and 'thinner' style of beer than ales, which can be seen as 'heavier'. After fermentation, the yeast that settles on the bottom of the vessel is drained off and the now 'green beer' is run off to be stored under cool conditions for two or three months. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  19. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Pilseners Pilseners are usually paler In colour than lagers, and have a fresh hop aroma with a strong carbonated, dry, clean finish. Pilseners are known as the ideal aperitif style of beer. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  20. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Ale styles Ales are generally an older style of beer. They are a result of using top fermenting yeasts, and once the yeast rises to the top, it is skimmed off before the ale is run off into barrels or bottles for further maturation. Ales are usually more 'complex' in flavour, darker in colour and less effervescent than lagers. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  21. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Ales may be served at cellar temperature (which to many means at room temperature, but when it Is realised that the cellar temperature in the northern hemisphere can be pretty cold, perhaps 'cellar temperature' should mean 'lightly chilled'. Some sub-types of ales are: • stouts • porters • barley wines. In the main, the stout that is usually served in Australia is served chilled, but there may well be drinkers who prefer certain stouts unchilled. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  22. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage The Packaging of Beer Draught (or bulk) beer Beer that comes In barrels (also known as kegs) Is referred to as 'draught beer' - also known as 'bulk beer' -- to differentiate it from beer that comes in bottles, cans or stubbies, which is known as 'packaged beer'. Any product which is drawn directly from a keg/barrel is called 'draught': thus you can have draught stout and draught cider. Bulk wine tends just to be called 'bulk wine' and not draught wine. The level of carbonation of draught beer is usually lower than for packaged beer. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  23. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Kegs should be stored in a cool area and never left out in the sun, as high temperatures can accelerate the ageing process. This can result In the deterioration of flavour and loss of quality. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  24. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Packaged beer This term refers to any beer packaged In a bottle or a can: • 24 cans/bottles makes up what is generally known as a 'slab' • a 375 ml bottle of beer is known as a 'stubby' • a 750 ml is often known as a 'King Brown' or a long neck' • 6 bottles or cans are known as a 'six pack'. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  25. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Boutique beer Boutique beer is beer produced by a small brewery. It may be dearer than normal, and may have a 'cult' following. A venue is unlikely to stock much in the way of boutique beer unless there is a demonstrated demand for it: your venue may, in fact, be a brewer of boutique beer! Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  26. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Imported beer Beers from many countries are now commonly sold in packaged form In venues. Some are relatively new arrivals on the Australian market, and some have been popular here for decades. Many are of a higher quality and price than domestic options, some aren't: however, it is always a matter of personal taste. It is interesting to remember that Fosters lager Is pretty commonplace locally, but - In England - it is an Imported beer. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  27. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage • Some of the more popular imported beers are: Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  28. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Spirits Spirit is fermented alcohol after it has been distilled to separate the alcohol and flavour from the water. Most spirits are made from grain such as barley, rye and corn, while others are made from grapes. There are 5 main spirits - brandy, whisky, vodka, rum and gin. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  29. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Distillation The process of distillation makes beverages of high alcoholic strength out of liquids from a lower alcoholic strength. During distillaton, a base Ingredient (with alcohol) is heated until the alcohol turns into steam or vapour. This is possible because alcohol boils at a lower temperature than water making it possible to vaporise most of the alcohol In the base liquid, leaving behind the water. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  30. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Once the vapour is trapped and then cooled, it turns back into a liquid that has a higher concentration of alcohol, which is then known as spirit wine. There are two styles of spirits: • Intrinsic Flavour Spirits When the main flavour is that of the flavouring agent. • Added Flavour Spirits Where a flavour is added to the neutral spirit. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  31. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Base Ingredients • grape wine makes brandy • sugar wine makes rum • fruit wine makes cherry brandy • malted/unmalted grain wine makes whisky, gin and vodka. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  32. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Brandy • Brandy was said to have been first developed as a by-product of the wine growing areas in France. • During the Middle Ages, France first began exporting wine and found it didn't travel well, so they boiled it down to a concentrate and upon arrival at its destination, the concentrate wine was mixed with water and then bottled. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  33. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Many people acquired a taste for the boiled down concentrate which came to be known as brandy. Cognac is brandy distilled from the wine made in the Cognac region of France. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  34. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Cognac can undergo a lengthy period of ageing in wooden casks and can be identified by letters to Indicate its quality: • X - Extra • V - Very • S - Superior • P - Pale • O - Old • M - Mellow • F - Fine • E - Extra or Special Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  35. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Thus, V.S.O.P means 'Very Superior Old Pale'. Brandy can be served straight, on-the-rocks or with a mixer. Cognac is usually served straight in a warmed brandy balloon. Common brandy brands sold in Australia are: • Chatelle • Hardys • McWilliams • Mildara • Seppelt • St. Agnes • Remy. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  36. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Commonly served cognacs in Australia are: • Courvoisier • Hennessy • Martel • Remy Martin. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  37. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Whisky and bourbon Whisky has been made by the Irish and the Scots for hundreds of years. The word 'whisky' comes from the Gaelic and means `water of life'. In Australia, there are over two hundred brands, covering five main types. Regular whisky drinkers really know their favourite tipple - so don't think you can 'pull one over them' and substitute one type - or one brand - for another: they are certain to pick the deception. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  38. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Scotch Is the most popular type of whisky, and there are three main kinds of Scotch whisky: • Traditional Malt Whisky made from the highest quality of malted barley. It can be aged between 5 and 25 years. • Blended Whisky can sometimes have up to 38 different whiskies in the blend. The majority of blended whiskies are bottled in Australia, after arriving here in bulk. • Deluxe Blended Grain Whisky, usually use a high proportion of malted grain in the blend. It is usually served on the rocks or with water. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  39. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Whisky can be served straight, on-the-rocks or with a mixer. Brands of scotch (bottled in Scotland - B.I.S.) commonly sold In Australia include: • Ballantines • Bells • Chivas Regal • CuttySark • Dewars • Dimple • Famous Grouse • J&B • Johnnie Walker • Teachers. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  40. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Scotch (bottled In Australia) commonly sold In Australia Includes: • Black Douglas • Grants • Highland Queen • Macleay Duff • Pipers • Vat 69. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  41. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Scotch ('Traditional Malt' B.I.S.) commonly sold In Australia Includes: • Glenfiddlch • Gienlivlt. American bourbons There are two main kinds of American bourbon: • Bourbon Whisky - made mostly from corn • Tennessee Whisky - made from a blend of cereals that have been filtered through finely ground sugar and maple charcoal. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  42. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage • It is served mostly with a mixer, though some like It on-the-rocks. American bourbon brands commonly sold in Australia Include: • Beam's Choice • Cougar • Early Times • Jack Daniels • Jim Beam. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  43. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Irish whiskey Irish whiskey (with an 'e') has been called the original of whiskies. It has a distinctive taste that sets it aside from other whiskies. It is served straight, on-the-rocks or with water. It Is also the basis of Irish Coffee. Irish whiskey brands commonly sold in Australia Include: • Tullamore Dew • Jameson. • Taste of Ireland. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  44. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Canadian whisky Canadian whisky is commonly known as rye whisky, Rye whisky has a light bodied taste. Canadian is usually served with a mixer, though some prefer it on-the-rocks. Canadian whisky brands commonly served in Australia are: • Canadian Club • Crown Royal • Seagram. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  45. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Vodka Vodka was first made in Kiev in the Ukraine in the 12th century. The word vodka in Russia means 'little water'. It was originally made out of potatoes and other vegetables, though is now distilled from grains, the principal one being rye. It is a colourless and uncomplicated spirit, with little to no taste, which lends it perfectly to being used as a mixer, and in cocktails: flavoured vodkas lend themselves to more creative uses. Brands of vodka commonly sold in Australia include • Absolut • Cossack • Smirnoff • Stolichnaya. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  46. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Rum Rum is made from distilled sugar molasses, and is usually produced where sugar cane is a major crop. Rum was said to have originated in the West Indies, and is still produced there today along with areas in eastern South America, the Philippines, Mauritius and, in smaller quantities, in the USA and Australia. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  47. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage There are three main styles of rum: • Dark or Brown Rum has a rich distinct flavour that comes from adding molasses and caramel • Gold Rum is matured for three years in charred casks with caramel added for colour • White Rum is rather light in taste, very popular and suitable for most mixed drinks. Rum is usually served with a mixer.  White rum is also a very popular Ingredient in cocktails. Brands of rum commonly sold in Australia Include: • Bacardi • Bundaberg • Captain Morgan • Coruba • Black Heart • Mt. Gay. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  48. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Gin The origins of gin go back to the 16° century in Holland. The common ingredients found in gin are juniper berries, angelica, liquorice, orris root, dried citrus peel, caraway and coriander seeds. It has a distinctive, dry taste. Gin is a very versatile drink and is commonly served with a mixer, especially tonic or bitter lemon. It is also used in cocktails and is the major ingredient in a Martini. Brands of On commonly sold In Australia Include: • Beefeater • Gilbeys • Gordons • Grants • Seagram • Tanqueray • Vickers. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  49. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage Tequila Tequila Is a colourless spirit that originated in Mexico. It Is made from fermenting and distilling a cactus-like agave plant called the Blue Mezcal, a cactus that mainly grows In the southwest region of Mexico. The township of Tequila Is the main production centre, hence the spirit's name. There are two types of tequila: • White Tequila is aged in wax-lined vats • Gold Tequila is matured In oak barrels just long enough to give its golden colour. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge

  50. Element 1: Research general information on food and beverage The most common way of drinking tequila, and the most traditional, is called 'lick, sip and suck', because you lick some salt, gulp down the tequila, then suck on a wedge of lemon. Some tequilas come with a Mezcal Worm, which is to be eaten by the drunker. Tequila is also a popular mix in cocktails like Tequila Sunrise. Brands of tequila commonly sold in Australia • Coyote • Cuervo • El Toro • Mestizo • TQ. Develop & update food and beverage knowledge