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TRAFFIC ANALYSIS TRANSPORTATION PLANNING TRAFFIC SAFETY. Developed for the ASCE YMF PE REVIEW COURSE August 27, 2007. COURSE REFERENCE SOURCES. Traffic and Highway Engineering , Garber and Hoel, 1997.

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TRAFFIC ANALYSIS TRANSPORTATION PLANNING TRAFFIC SAFETY


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    1. TRAFFIC ANALYSISTRANSPORTATION PLANNINGTRAFFIC SAFETY Developed for the ASCE YMF PE REVIEW COURSE August 27, 2007

    2. COURSE REFERENCE SOURCES Traffic and Highway Engineering, Garber and Hoel, 1997. “PTOE Certification Program Refresher Course.” Institute of Transportation Engineers. 2001. Traffic Engineering, Roess, McShane, and Prassas, 1997. Highway Capacity Manual, Transportation Research Board, 2000. Six-Minute Solutions for Civil PE Exam Transportation Problems Voigt, 2004.

    3. COURSE OVERVIEW • What to bring to the test • Civil Engineering Reference Manual for the PE Exam, Lindeburg • Highway Capacity Manual, Transportation Research Board – “HCM” • A Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets, AASHTO – “The Green Book” • Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, Federal Highway Administration – “MUTCD”

    4. COURSE OVERVIEW • Course Goals • Answers < 6 mins. • Review of concepts and procedures • Slides with notes will be included on ASCE YMF Course webpage

    5. COURSE OVERVIEW • Morning Session – 20% Transportation Topics • Transportation Planning • Traffic Safety • Pavement Design (Rigid and Flexible) • Surveying • Curves (Horizontal, Compound, Vertical) • Construction Staking

    6. COURSE OVERVIEW • Transportation Afternoon Session • 13% Transportation Planning • Capacity Analysis • Origin Destination Studies • Site Impact Analysis • Trip Generation/Distribution Assignment • 13% Traffic Safety • High-Hazard Locations • Countermeasure Choices • Roadside Designs • Taper Design

    7. COURSE OVERVIEW • Topics Covered Tonight • Traffic Flow Principles • Capacity Analysis • Multilane highways • Freeways • Signalized Intersections • Traffic Volume Studies • Speed Studies

    8. COURSE OVERVIEW • Topics Covered Tonight (Continued) • Parking Operations Analysis • Sight Distance Analysis • Braking Distance Analysis • Pedestrian Facilities

    9. COURSE OVERVIEW • Traffic analyses not covered tonight • Unsignalized Intersections (HCM Ch 17) • Mass Transit Studies (HCM Ch 14 and 27) • Traffic Control Devices • Bicycle Facilities (HCM Ch 11) • Driver Behavior and Performance • Freeway Weaving and Ramps (HCM Ch 24-26)

    10. ASCE YMF PE REVIEW COURSE Traffic Analysis (Based on HCM Chapters 2 and 7)

    11. Traffic Flow Principles • Uninterrupted Flow • Vehicles are not interrupted by external factors. • Interrupted Flow • Vehicle flow on interrupted flow facilities is influenced by external factors such as traffic signals, stop or yield signs, or frequent uncontrolled intersections or high volume driveways.

    12. Traffic Flow Principles • Traffic Stream Parameters • Flow Rate or Volume • Speed • Density

    13. Traffic Flow PrinciplesBasic Stream Parameters

    14. Traffic Flow PrinciplesBasic Stream Parameters Volume (veh per hour) # of vehicles that: pass a point on a roadway, travel within a lane, or travel in a given direction on a roadway Flow Rate (veh per hour) Based on time periods of <1 hr Converted to 1 hr time period

    15. Traffic Flow PrinciplesPeak Hour Factor (PHF) Ties Hourly Volumes to Flow Rates (typically 0.92) For 15 minute periods:

    16. Traffic Flow Principles Example Find the peak hour Find the peak hour factor (PHF)

    17. Traffic Flow Principles Example • Peak Hour • 7:00-8:00 = 500+550+650+675 = 2,375 • 7:15-8:15 = 550+650+675+625 = 2,500 • 7:30-8:30 = 650+675+625+575 = 2,525 • PHF • PHF = Peak Hour / (4 x peak 15 minute vol) • PHF = 2,525 / (4x675) = 0.935

    18. Traffic Flow PrinciplesSpeedDistance Traveled per Unit of Time • Time Mean Speed (TMS) Time mean speed is defined as the average speed of all vehicles passing a point over a specified time period. • Space Mean Speed (SMS) Space mean speed is defined as the average speed of all vehicles occupying a given section of roadway over a specific time period

    19. Traffic Flow Principles • Example Assume a road section of 88 feet long (Note 60 mph = 88 fps). Four cars are timed through the section. Their times were: 1 s, 1 s, 2 s, and 1.5s. What is the TMS? What is the SMS

    20. Traffic Flow Principles • Example TMS: 88/1+88/1+88/2+88/1.5 or individual speeds of 60 mph, 60 mph, 30 mph, and 45 mph TMS = (60+60+30+45)/4 = 48.7 mph

    21. Traffic Flow Principles • Example SMS: add up the travel times and divide by the number of vehicles. Then divide the length of the section by average time SMS = 88 / ((1+1+2+1.5)/4) = 43.5 mph Note: SMS is always less than or equal to TMS

    22. Traffic Flow PrinciplesTravel Time The time required to travel a segment of a given length. Frequently used by traffic engineers to assess the performance of the transportation system

    23. Traffic Flow PrinciplesDensity Density is the number of vehicles in a given length of roadway or a lane. It is usually expressed in vehicles/km (vehicles/mile).

    24. Traffic Flow Principles Uninterrupted Flow – Basic Relationship q = us k q = flow (veh/hour) us = space mean speed (km/h [mph]) k = density (veh/km [veh/mile])

    25. Traffic Flow PrinciplesUninterrupted Flow - Key Points qm = maximum flow or capacity uf = free flow speed when flows approach zero uo = optimum speed under maximum flow conditions kj = jam density when both flow and speed approach zero, and ko = optimum density under maximum flow conditions

    26. Traffic Flow Principles Headway and Spacing Microscopic Measures of Flow (individual vehicles) Headway is the time between successive vehicles past a point. Spacing is the distance between successive vehicles past a point

    27. Traffic Flow Principles MoreFlow-Density Relationships Space Mean Speed = Flow x Spacing Density = Flow x Travel Time Spacing = Space mean speed x Headway Headway = Travel Time x Spacing

    28. Traffic Flow PrinciplesInterrupted Flow Saturation Flow Rate (usually 1900 pcphpl @ intersections) s = 3600 h s = saturation flow rate (veh/hr/lane) h = average headway (sec)

    29. Traffic Flow PrinciplesDelay Signalized Intersections: Control Delay Stop Controlled Intersections: Control Delay

    30. CAPACITY ANALYSES • Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) governs: • Urban Streets (Chapters 10 and 15) • Two-Lane Highways (Chapters 12 and 20) • Multilane Highways (Chapters 12 and 21) • Freeways (Chapters 13, 22, and 23) • Signalized Intersections (Chapter 16) • Unsignalized Intersections (Chapter 17)

    31. CAPACITY ANALYSESLevel Of Service Definitions

    32. CAPACITY ANALYSESUrban Street Methodology HCM page 15-2 • Define Segments and Sections • Determine Free-Flow Speed • Compute Running Time and Intersection Delays (or record delay and travel time) • Compute Average Travel Speed • Determine LOS

    33. CAPACITY ANALYSESTwo-Lane Highway Methodology HCM page 20-2 • Define Average Travel Speed • Compute Free-Flow Speed • Adjust Demand Volume for Average Speed and % Time-Spent Following • Compute Flow Rates, Average Travel Speed, % Time-Spent-Following • Determine LOS

    34. CAPACITY ANALYSESMultilane Highway Methodology • For Partial or no access control with a Divided Cross-Section • Full Access Control and Undivided Cross-Section • 4 or more through lanes and two-way operation • 2-3 through lanes and one-way operation

    35. CAPACITY ANALYSESMultilane Highway Methodology HCM page 21-2 • Calculate Free Flow Speed (FFS) and Flow Rate • Define Speed-Flow Curve • Determine Speed from Speed-Flow Curve • Compute density as f(flow rate, speed) • Determine LOS

    36. CAPACITY ANALYSESFreeways • Divided Highway • Access Control • Uninterrupted flow

    37. CAPACITY ANALYSESFreeway Capacity • Levels of Service - A to F • A - Best operating conditions • F - Worst operating conditions • Segments • Basic Freeway Sections • Weaving Areas • Ramp Junctions

    38. CAPACITY ANALYSESFlow Rates Under Ideal Conditions • 3.6 m (12 ft) traffic lanes and no obstructions within 1.87 m (6 ft) of the pavement edge. • Level terrain with geometric conditions that would allow free flow speeds of 70 mph (110 km/h). • Only passenger cars in the traffic stream.

    39. CAPACITY ANALYSESFreeway Segment Methodology HCM page 23-2 • Calculate Free Flow Speed (FFS) or Flow Rate • Define Speed-Flow Curve • Determine Speed • Compute Density • Determine LOS

    40. CAPACITY ANALYSESBasic Freeway Section Capacity Calculation Procedures Flow Rates Free Flow Speed Density Level of Service

    41. CAPACITY ANALYSESFree Flow Speed • By field measurement of speeds on a freeway section determined by a spot speed study. • By estimating free flow speeds on the basis of physical characteristics.

    42. CAPACITY ANALYSESLevel of Service

    43. CAPACITY ANALYSESTRAFFIC SIGNAL OPERATION • Pretimed Control • Consistent Cycle and Interval Lengths • Lower Installation and Maintenance Costs • Simpler Operation • Traffic Actuated Control • Responds to Changing Traffic Flows • Greater Efficiency • Minimizes Delay • Minimizes Some Crashes

    44. CAPACITY ANALYSESPRINCIPLES OF SIGNAL PHASING • Number of Phases Depends on Geometric Design, Volume, and Pedestrians • Phase to Minimize Potential Hazards • As Number of Phases Increases, Total Delay Increases • Use the Minimum Number of Phases to Accommodate Traffic