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Presentation Overview Characteristics of Sound- overview Dynamics Ministry expectations (dynamics) Key Questions Content Symbols and language Teaching activities or strategies CHARACTERISTICS OF SOUND (Hookey, 2000, p. 65) DYNAMICS : How loud or soft is it? TIMBRE :

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presentation overview
Presentation Overview
  • Characteristics of Sound- overview

Dynamics

  • Ministry expectations (dynamics)
  • Key Questions
  • Content
  • Symbols and language
  • Teaching activities or strategies
characteristics of sound hookey 2000 p 65
CHARACTERISTICS OF SOUND(Hookey, 2000, p. 65)

DYNAMICS:

  • How loud or soft is it?

TIMBRE:

  • What is its characteristic sound?

(quality of the sound)

DURATION:

  • How long or short is the sound?

PITCH:

  • How high or low is the sound?
ministry expectations dynamics
Ministry ExpectationsDynamics
  • Identify examples of dynamics in their life and in music (Gr. 1) and how they are achieved (Gr. 2)
  • Identify the dynamics in familiar pieces of music (Gr. 3)
  • Indicate with appropriate hand movements the dynamics heard in familiar pieces of music (Gr. 3)
ministry expectations dynamics4
Ministry ExpectationsDynamics
  • Sing or play expressively, giving particular attention to using suitable dynamics, tempi and phrasing. (Gr. -6)
  • Create musical compositions that show appropriate use of the various elements of music ( tempo, dynamics, melody, form, texture, tone colour and perform them.Gr. 5-6)
  • Describe how the various elements of music are used to create mood in two music pieces of different styles. (Gr. 5-6)
dynamics key questions hookey 2000 p 41 43
DYNAMICS:Key Questions(Hookey, 2000, p. 41-43)
  • What do students associate with loud sounds or soft sounds?
  • What language do they have to describe the differences?
  • What choices of dynamics do they make? Why?
dynamics the varying degree of loudness
DYNAMICS:the varying degree of loudness

Content

  • music may be loud or soft or get louder or softer
  • sounds may get suddenly louder
  • melodies and pieces may have a dynamic shape or a steady dynamic level
dynamics language and symbols
DYNAMICS:LANGUAGE AND SYMBOLS
  • Pianissimo pp very soft
  • piano p soft
  • mezzopiano mp medium soft
  • mezzoforte mf medium loud
  • forte f loud
  • fortissimo ff very loud
  • sforzando sf sudden loud note
  • cresendo < getting louder
  • decresendo > getting softer
dynamics activities
DYNAMICS: ACTIVITIES
  • Singing: sing a song all at one level and contrast it by singing with dynamics
  • Chanting: Do a chant all at one level and do same one with dynamics
  • Creative thinking: have children add their own dynamics to a familiar piece.
dynamics practical application
DYNAMICS:Practical Application

In a Dark Wood (p.30 Musicanada 3)

  • Say the chant without any dynamics
  • Explain to the students what fff to ppp means.
  • Say the chant with the dynamics as marked.
  • Work on articulation and diction.
dynamics practical application10
DYNAMICS:Practical Application

Someone Came Knocking (p. 108Musicanada 3)

Teach song using rote or tape method.

Teach dynamics at the end of the song.

Add the dynamics as you sing.

Work on crisp articulation and contrasting legato (smooth) singing.

summary of dynamics
Summary of Dynamics
  • Characteristics of Sound
  • Ministry expectations
  • Key Questions
  • Content
  • Symbols and language
  • Teaching activities or strategies
timbre distinctive character of a sound
Timbre:distinctive character of a sound

Overview:

  • Definition
  • Ministry expectations
  • Key Questions
  • Categories
  • Activities and teaching strategies
ministry expectations
Ministry Expectations
  • identify correctly specific sounds heard in their classroom (door closing, chalk squeaking) Gr. 1
  • Produce a specific effect (sound of wind, farm animals) using various sounds sources (e.g. voice body, musical instruments, “found materials” Gr. 1
  • Create simple accompaniments and sound effects to songs, poems and chants using various sound sources (voice, body, instruments, or “found” sounds) Gr. 1-3
ministry expectations14
Ministry Expectations
  • Identify the four families of orchestral instruments (strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion) Gr. 2
  • Create or arrange music or a song to accompany a reading, dramatization, using appropriate rhythm instruments, body percussion, or “found” sounds Gr. 3-6
  • Identify the instruments within the percussion family of orchestral instruments Gr. 3
ministry expectations15
Ministry Expectations
  • Identify the individual instruments of the woodwind, brass, string and percussion families Gr. 4
  • Recognize and classify the various instruments (woodwind, brass, stringed, percussion) Gr. 5
timbre distinctive character of a sound hookey 2000 p 44 47
Timbre:distinctive character of a sound(Hookey, 2000, p.44-47)

Key Questions:

  • Do they have the vocabulary for comparing a range of sound sources?
  • Can they make choices for their own compositions?
timbre content
TIMBRE : CONTENT

Categories for timbre

  • Environmental: natural sound , man made sounds
  • Voice: man, woman and child
  • soprano, alto, tenor, bass, counter tenor, falsetto
  • choirs: adult, children’s, male, mixed
timbre content18
TIMBRE : CONTENT
  • Body: stamp, patsch, clap, snap
  • Orff Instruments: tuned percussion instruments - glockenspiel, marimbas, metalophone, xylophone, hand drums
  • Electronic: synthesizers, keyboards, computer
  • Boomwackers: Plastic tubes of various lengths to produce different pitches
categories for timbre
CATEGORIES FOR TIMBRE

ORCHESTRA:

  • Families of instruments:
  • String:
  • violin, viola, cello, bass
  • Brass:
  • trumpet, French horn, trombone, tuba
  • Woodwind:
  • flute, piccolo, oboe, English horn
categories for timbre20
CATEGORIES FOR TIMBRE
  • Percussion:
  • timpani, snare drum, bass drum, cymbals, bells, xylophone, claves etc.
  • Keyboard:
  • piano, organ, synthesizer
  • Folk:
  • guitar, ukulele, autoharp
timbre activities
TIMBRE: ACTIVITIES
  • Create a vocabulary list of sound words.
  • Try out various ways to use voice.
  • Listen to identify instruments.
  • Build your own instruments.
timbre activities22
TIMBRE: ACTIVITIES
  • Play timbre matching games.
  • Interpret a story using various timbre.
  • Analyze a story using timbre.
  • Add instruments or found sounds to create soundscapes or accompaniments.
slide23

My Moccasins Have Not Walked

My moccasins have not walked

Among the giant forest trees

My leggings have not brushed

Against the fern and berry bush

My medicine pouch has not been filled

With roots and herbs and sweet grass

My hands have not fondled the spotted fawn

My eyes have not beheld

The golden rainbow of the north

My hair has not been adorned

With the eagle feather

Yet

My dreams are dreams of these

My heart is one with them

The scent of them caresses my soul.

Duke Redbird

slide24

BANG! Smash! Sh…

Bang! Smash! Noisy beat!

Smash! Crash! Clatter!

Louder, louder, louder, pop!

Noise, noise, noise, stop!

(no words, express the beat with sound)

Sh… Sh… Tippy toe.

Sneaky, creaky, off we go…

slide25

Summer Showers

The rain comes in sheets

Sweeping the streets.

Here and here and here,

Umbrellas appear.

They tilt and they lean

Like mushrooms, like flowers,

They grow when it showers.

slide26

Billy Boy’s Boots

Billy boy’s boots are big

And Billy boy like to jump

So Billy boy’s boots go

Bumpety, bumpety, bumpety, bumpety bump!

slide27

Couldn’t Sleep Last Night

Couldn’t sleep last night

With the thunder and the lightning,

And the dog on the bed

And the chicken in the kitchen

At the Barnyard farm.

Couldn’t sleep at all last night

With the baby crying

And the thunder and the lightning,

And the dog on the bed

And the chicken in the kitchen

At the Barnyard farm.

Couldn’t sleep at all last night

With my Daddy snoring…

Couldn’t sleep at all last night

With the cows a mooing…

summary timbre
Summary: Timbre
  • Definition
  • Ministry Expectations
  • Key questions
  • Categories
    • Environment
    • Voice and body
    • Instruments
  • Activities and teaching strategies
rhythm the organization of time
RHYTHM: the organization of time

Overview

  • Definition of terms
  • Ministry Expectations
  • Key questions
  • Content
  • Activities and teaching strategies
rhythm relates to the organization of time hookey 2000 p 48 49
Rhythmrelates to the organization of time(Hookey, 2000, p. 48-49)
  • DURATION:How long or short is it?
  • ARTICULATION:
    • the speed and energy of a note
  • BEAT:
    • the steady pulse
  • TEMPO:
    • speed of music
rhythm
Rhythm
  • ACCENTS:
    • emphasize some beats either strong or weak
  • METRE:
    • grouping of beats into sets by regularrecurring accents, may be simple or compound
  • RHYTHM PATTERN:
    • pattern of long and short sounds that move in relation to a basic underlying beat.
rhythm32
Rhythm
  • FREE RHYTHM:
    • pattern of long and short sounds that are unrelated to beat.
  • LEGATO:
    • sounds are joined together smoothly
  • STACCATO:
    • Clearly separated sounds.
free rhythm
Free Rhythm

Examples:

  • Listening: Music In Education selection
  • Poem: I Am Me
ministry expectations grades 1 6
Ministry ExpectationsGrades 1-6
  • Identify examples of beat in daily life (Gr. 1)
  • Identify rhythms and rhythm patterns in language (Gr. 1- 2)
  • Distinguish between beat and rhythm in music (Gr. 1-2)
  • Create rhythm patterns using a variety of sounds (Gr. 1- 2)
  • Identify the tempo of various pieces of music

(Gr. 2)

ministry expectations grades 1 635
Ministry ExpectationsGrades 1-6
  • Identify the beat, rhythm, and tempo in familiar pieces of music (Gr. 3)
  • Recognize that sounds and silences of different durations may be represented by symbols (Gr. 3)
  • Identify and/or interpret whole notes, half notes, quarter notes, and eighth notes and their corresponding rests in 4/4 time (Gr. 4-6)
  • Create an accompaniment for a story, poem or drama presentation , using their knowledge of beat and rhythm(Gr. 4-6)
ministry expectations grades 1 636
Ministry ExpectationsGrades 1-6
  • Conduct in 4/4, 2/4 or 3/4 time (5-6)
  • Read correctly familiar and unfamiliar music that contains whole notes, half notes, quarter notes, and eight notes and their corresponding rests in 4/4 time (6)
  • Create musical compositions that show the appropriate use of the various elements of music ( beat, rhythm) (6)
rhythm key questions hookey 2000 p 49 51
RHYTHM: KEY QUESTIONS(Hookey, 2000, p. 49-51)
  • Do the learners display knowledge of the different aspects of rhythm?
  • Can they perform them in various ways?
  • Can they improvise with them?
  • Can they discover them in the music they hear and perform?
rhythm content
RHYTHM:CONTENT
  • Students may develop concepts about rhythm by listening to, moving, creating, mapping, singing, chanting and playing music.
  • Music may or may not have a definite feeling of rhythm.
  • If it does not have a definite feeling of rhythm it is called free rhythm.
rhythm content39
RHYTHM: CONTENT
  • Music may move with a steady beat.
  • Each beat may be divided into smaller parts.
  • Music moves in rhythm patterns of long and short sounds and silences.
rhythm practical applications
RHYTHM:Practical Applications

The Grand Old Duke of York(Musicanada 2 p. 20)

  • Teach the song by tape method.
  • Questions: How many men did he have? Where did he take them?
  • Keep the beat in different parts of your body as you listen to the tape.
  • Join in the singing as you learn the words to the first verse.
  • Keep the beat in your feet as you march around the room. Add actions to match words. Can you also keep the rhythm in your hands?
  • Extensions: Open text and follow the dynamic and tempo markings as shown.
rhythm practical applications41
RHYTHM:Practical Applications

Everybody Put a Little Bit In (Up with People) Gr. 3-5

Why can we use this live performance music?

  • Teach song using tape method.
  • Questions to focus listening: What have these musicians done in their travels? What have they learned?
  • Join in with the hand jive as soon as you can.

Extensions:

  • Have students create own actions or dance steps or write additional verses.
everybody put a little bit in
Everybody Put a Little Bit In

Well, we’ve traveled a lot of miles

And we’ve made a lot of friends,

Sang a few songs and we sang them again.

We see all kinds of people

Comin’ down the street.

They sing a different tune

And they walk a different beat.

And their faces tell the story

Of the places they have been

Might just be a dime in the hand of time

But they all put a little bit in.

everybody put a little bit in43
Everybody Put a Little Bit In

Where ever you’re going, where ever you’ve been,

Everybody puts a little bit in.

What ever the colour of your skin,

Everybody puts a little bit in.

In this whole world, we’re all kin,

Everybody put a little bit in.

Got nothin’ to loose, ‘cause we all win

When everybody puts a little bit in.

Well we all carry treasures that make us unique,

From the culture we show to the language we speak.

And we’re all street singers in our own way

With our tales to tell and our songs to play.

everybody put a little bit in44
Everybody Put a Little Bit In

And our faces tell the story

Of the places they have been

Might just be a dime in the hand of time

But we all put a little bit in

Where ever you’re going, where ever you’ve been,

Everybody puts a little bit in.

Chinese or Pole, Egyptian or Finn

Everybody puts a little bit in.

In this whole world, we’re all kin,

Everybody put a little bit in.

Got nothin’ to loose, ‘cause we all win

When everybody puts a little bit in.

rhythm practical applications45
RHYTHM:Practical Applications

A full unit on teaching Beat, Rhythm, and Accents can be found in the Canada is Music Grade 3 and 4 starting on p. 282

  • Use teachers resource guide and add one element at a time.  Soon you will be covering it all.
  • Pg. 282 Going to the Beach: "The Footprint of Music"
  • Follow the footprints with your fingers or tap the beat softly on your desk.
  • Listening to blues allows children to try new and different things with their voices.
rhythm practical applications46
RHYTHM:Practical Applications
  • Children in grade 2 can make up their own rhythm card kits using picture patterns like P.286 Musicanada 3 and 4 and teach them to grade 1. This allows the grade 2 students to apply what they have learned about rhythm patterns.
  • Subsequent pages teach ta’s, ti ti’s, ta-aa, whoosh for rests, ta-aa-aa. Rhythm chants like “Beats on the Outside” and “Rhythmic Posture Chant are included.
rhythm practical applications48
RHYTHM:Practical Applications

Rhythm Flash Card Kit

  • clapping and saying  Ti Ti Ta's Cards are sequenced from very easy to quite hard. Can make up your own set using computer graphics or can copy Nip U’s set onto bristol board squares.
rhythm activities 1 hookey 2000 p 49 51
RHYTHM: ACTIVITIES #1(Hookey, 2000,p. 49-51)
  • Walk the beat.
  • Clap the rhythm.
  • Play echo clapping games using names and familiar words.
  • Identify familiar songs after hearing only the rhythm pattern.
  • Do actions for sounds of different lengths.
  • Clap the rhythm pattern of a song using inner hearing.
rhythm activities 2
RHYTHM: ACTIVITIES # 2
  • Label the pattern of sounds as the rhythm pattern.
  • Observe rhythm patterns maps with long and short sounds for familiar songs.
  • Map the rhythm pattern with long and short sounds.
  • Chant the rhythm pattern using time names.
  • Use lines or bars to show relative length of sounds.
  • Read rhythm symbol charts.
rhythm activities 3
RHYTHM: ACTIVITIES #3
  • Create rhythmic improvisations on found sounds or percussion instruments.
  • Improvise a set of rhythms. Combine them into a poly- rhythmic piece.
  • Select short sections of a piece to play as a rhythmic ostinato.
  • Create rhythm patterns using rhythm symbols.
rhythm activities 4
RHYTHM: ACTIVITIES #4
  • Compare music with: strong beat/weak beat and slow tempo/fast tempo.
  • Play with various tempi for songs and drum activities.
  • Interpret music by : changing tempo or singing in free rhythm
rhythm activities 5
RHYTHM: ACTIVITIES #5
  • Listen to discover where the accented sounds are and move or clap on the accents.
  • Speak a poem without a steady underlying beat. Choose sounds of free rhythm to accompany it.
  • Separate the beat from the rhythm by putting the beat in the feet and the rhythm pattern in the hands.
  • Accompanyhaiku poetry.
rhythm activities 6
RHYTHM: ACTIVITIES #6

Show beat with:

  • single repeated movements (hands together)
  • 2 or more repeated movements (hands separately)
  • hand jive
  • body percussion: stamp, patsch, clap, snap, partner clapping
  • beat maps with pictures
  • beat maps with lines
activities jingle bells
ACTIVITIES: Jingle Bells

Grade 1: Music Builders Listening

  • Begin listening to the song
  • Keep the beat in your feet
  • Change the beat to other parts of your body
  • Keep the rhythm in your hands
  • Beat in your feet and rhythm in your hands
  • Use your arms to show each phrase
  • What instruments do you hear? Do they stay the same?
  • What are the dynamics of this version of the song?
rhythm56
RHYTHM

Summary: We have explored:

  • Definition of terms:

rhythm, articulation, beat, tempo, accent, metre, rhythm pattern, free rhythm, staccato, legato

  • Ministry Expectations grades 1-6
  • Key questions that guide the children’s understanding of this element.
  • Content
  • Activities and teaching strategies Gr. 1-6
references
References

Brooks, P. et al (1982). Musicanada 3. Toronto:Holt, Rinehart & Winston.

Brooks, P. et al (1982). Musicanada 5. Toronto:Holt, Rinehart & Winston.

Hardy, M. & Mason, E. (2000) Music Builders 1. Toronto: Berandol

Harrison, J. & Harrison, M. (2000) Canada Is Music… Toronto: Gordon V. Thompson

Hookey, M. (2000). Learning Music: A team approach to elementary music education. Toronto: Museworks.

Ontario Ministry of Education and Training: Art’s guidelines K -8

Schafer, P., Stack, Y. (1991). Musicanada 2. Toronto: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.