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Coordinated Approach to School Health. Staff Wellness Component. Making the Connection: Health and Student Achievement. Shane McNeill Office of Healthy Schools. Coordinated School Health Program. Physical Education. Health Education. Family and Community Involvement. Health Services.

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Presentation Transcript
slide2

Coordinated Approach to School Health

Staff Wellness Component

Making the Connection:

Health and Student Achievement

Shane McNeill

Office of Healthy Schools

coordinated school health program
Coordinated School Health Program

Physical Education

Health Education

Family and Community Involvement

Health Services

Health

Promotion

for Staff

Nutrition

Services

Healthy School Environment

Health Education

every day in mississippi we have an opportunity to reach
Every day in Mississippi, we have an opportunity to reach…
  • 494,590 public school students
  • 152 School Districts
  • 618 Elementary Schools/225 Secondary Schools
  • Over 64,300 adults work as teachers, school building staff, or school district staff
health promotion for staff
Health Promotion for Staff

Teachers who participated in a health promotion program focusing on exercise, stress management, and nutrition reported:

  • Increased participation in exercise and lower weight
  • Better ability to handle job stress
  • A higher level of general well-being

Blair, Collingwood, Reynolds,

Smith, Hagan and Sterling, 1984

academic achievement
Academic Achievement
  • Staff absenteeism = Substitute teacher
    • Discipline referrals increase
    • Lack of Continuity
    • Quality of teaching
    • Costs to School Districts
nutrition and fitness
Nutrition and Fitness
  • Improve attendance
  • Improve energy levels
  • Improve participation
responsibility
Responsibility!
  • School staff serves as role models for students
  • Efficiency of School Staff
  • Wellness Matters
devastating consequences of doing nothing
Devastating Consequences of Doing Nothing
  • Today’s generation of American children may be the first in modern history to live shorter lives than their parents

U.S. Surgeon General Richard Carmona

March 2, 2004

the hidden costs
The Hidden Costs
  • Extra staff time needed for students with low academic performance or behavior problems caused by poor nutrition and physical inactivity.
  • Costs associated with time and staff needed to administer medications needed by students with associated health problems.
  • Healthcare costs, absenteeism, and lower productivity due to the effects of poor nutrition, inactivity and overweight among school employees.
mississippi budget consequences
Mississippi Budget Consequences

Obesity-related costs $757 million dollars per year, over half of those expenses were paid by Medicaid and Medicare.

why are healthcare premiums increasing
Why Are Healthcare Premiums Increasing?

Source: PricewaterhouseCoopers

The Factors Fueling Rising Healthcare Costs 2006

slide16

3 Keys to Success

  • Keep It Simple: Focus on a few key issues; aim for high participation rates
  • Communicate Effectively: Build infrastructure for future success
  • Reward Healthy Behaviors: Celebrate success
slide17

Know Your Population’s Needs

Physical activity

Healthy eating

Weight management

slide18

Set Realistic Goals and Objectives

  • GOALS
  • Faculty and staff will be more active
  • Faculty and staff will improve eating habits
  • OBJECTIVES
  • At least 40% of faculty and staff will complete 8-week physical activity challenge
  • Healthy food items will be labeled in cafeteria and vending machines
slide19

Evaluate Your Resources

  • In Your School
  • Ways to communicate
  • Health teachers, physical education teachers, food service professionals, school nurses, others
  • Resources provided by Bower Foundation
  • In Your Community
  • Non-profit health agencies
  • Local hospitals
  • Home extension service
slide20

Involve the “Right” People

  • People who want to be involved
  • Those with access to resources
  • Decision makers
  • Representative Committee
    • Meet monthly
    • Identify opportunities
    • Coordinate baby steps
    • Build infrastructure
slide21

Develop a 3-Year Strategy

  • YEAR 1
  • Start with small simple steps
  • Focus on participation, and measure it
  • Focus on FUN
  • YEAR 2
  • Build on success
  • Focus on outcomes, and measure them
  • YEAR 3
  • Continue to build on success
  • Tell your school’s story to others
slide22

DO SOMETHING

Even little things make a difference when done consistently over time.

Don’t let what you can do keep you from doing what you can do.

Success breeds success.

ohs initiatives to support staff wellness
OHS Initiatives to Support Staff Wellness
  • School Wellness Policy
  • John D. Bower, M.D. School Health Network
  • Health is Academic Start-Up Grant
  • Vending Machine Case Study
  • Vending Machine Guidelines
  • Guide for developing Communicable Disease Policy
resources
Resources
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

www.cdc.gov