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Economic Impacts of UNINTENTIONAL Career Decision-Making 2003 Texas LMI Conference Catch the Wave of Labor Market Information Austin, June 11, 2003 Phil Jarvis V.P. Partnership Development Prevailing Wisdom With good [career, learning and labor market] INFORMATION …

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slide1

Economic Impacts of

UNINTENTIONAL

Career Decision-Making

2003 Texas LMI Conference

Catch the Wave

of Labor Market Information

Austin, June 11, 2003

Phil Jarvis

V.P. Partnership Development

slide2

Prevailing Wisdom

With good [career, learning and labor market] INFORMATION …

… people will make good career DECISIONS.

slide3

INFORMATION

Print, computer, internet, video

  • O*NET, OOH, SOC
  • ALMIS, AJB, ACIK, ACO
  • SOCRATES, WIN, TRACER
  • Texas LMI Products & Services
  • OSCAR, DECIDE, CARES
  • CDR Resources (books, brochures,

magazines, videos, software) 30

  • Hotlines, Tabloids, Videos, “How To’s”
  • DoD (ASVAB)
  • Industry Sectors, Corporation,

Private Publishers

slide4

Reality Check

(Canadian Data)

Secondary School

70% of students expect post-secondary

80% of parents expect post-secondary

32% of students go directly to college or university

15% of students drop out of high school

10% of students expect to work right after school

50% of students work directly after high school

Post-Secondary

40% change programs or quit – 1st year

50% are NOT in work closely related to their programs of study 2 years after graduation

Bottom Line

<15% reach planned destinations

slide5

National Graduation Rate

Class of 1998

71 percent overall

78 percent – white students

56 percent – black students

54 percent – hispanic students

Source: U.S. DoE Website

slide6

Are HS Grads Ready?

For the For Post-

Workplace Secondary

Students 80% 87%

Parents 40% 65%

PS Teachers 35% 53%

Employers 35% 70%

Source: Environics West, Calgary, 1997

slide7

Economic Impacts

  • Education $700 Billion
  • Corporate Training $200 Billion
  • Health $460 Billion
  • Government revenues $2,000 Billion
  • Productivity $10,590 Billion
  • 1% Improvement $138 Billion
  • EACH YEAR
slide8

Most youthare not ready.

Most adults in career transitions face bigger challenges, and

are not ready.

WHY NOT?

slide9

Changing Work Dynamic

  • Global competition, evolving technology
  • Organizations re-defining, “right-sizing”
  • Contracting out, project-based, no benefits
  • Commitment to customers and bottom line
  • - not to employees
  • Aging population, looming skills crisis
  • Work creation by small companies
  • Re-definition of jobs and work (Rifken,
  • Bridges) 12-25 jobs in 5 sectors
  • More and better opportunities –
  • non-traditional work “packages”
  • Result Traditional guidance
  • “mindset” no longer works
slide10

VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE MODEL

Help people make informed decisions

  • Explore self (tests)
  • Explore occupations (information)
  • Match (Trait/Factor) and choose “best fit”
  • Develop education/training plan
  • Graduate and secure employment
  • Work hard, be secure, climb the ladder
  • Retire on pension
slide11

VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE MODEL

Help people make informed decisions

CAREER MANAGEMENT MODEL

Help people become self-reliant, resilient citizens, able confidently to find work they love while coping with constant workforce and societal change and maintaining balance between work and life roles”

slide12

Paradigm Shift

  • OLD: Choose your DESTINATION
    • “What will you be when ...”
  • NEW: Follow your HEART
    • “Who are you now?”
    • “What are your special skills?”
    • “Who needs what you like to do?”
    • “What work arrangements make sense?”
slide13

The High Five

Career Management Principles

Know yourself, believe in yourself and follow your heart.

Focus on the journey, not the destination. Become a good traveler.

You’re not alone. Access your allies, and be a good ally.

Change is constant, and brings with it new opportunities.

Learning is lifelong. We are learners by nature.

slide14

Career Management

Good life and work choices require:

1. Human support

Fading Link

Information

Growing Link

3. Career management skills

Missing Link

slide15

National Career Development Guidelines

National framework of

Career Management Skills

www.blueprint4life.ca

slide16

COMPETENCIES

US Guidelines – Canadian Blueprint

A PERSONAL MANAGEMENT

1 build and maintain a positive self-concept

2 interact effectively with others

3 change and grow throughout life

B LEARNING AND WORK EXPLORATION

4 engage in lifelong learning

5 locate and effectively use information

6 understand work/society/economy relationship

C CAREER BUILDING

7 secure or create and maintain work

8 make life and work decisions

9 maintain balanced life and work roles

10 understand changing nature of life and work roles

11 manage one’s career building process

slide18

Learning Stages

  • Acquisition (acquire, explore, understand, discover)
  • Application (apply, demonstrate, experience, express, participate)
  • Personalization(integrate, appreciate, internalize, personalize)
  • Actualization(create, engage, externalize, improve, transpose)
competency 8 level 1 explore and improve decision making
Competency 8Level 1: Explore and improve decision-making

Stage a: ACQUISITION

8.1 a1 Understand how choices are made

8.1 a2 Explore what can be learned from experiences

8.1 a3 Explore what might interfere with attaining goals

8.1 a4 Explore strategies used in solving problems

8.1 a5 Explore alternatives in decision-making situations

8.1 a6 Understand how personal beliefs and attitudes influence decision-making

8.1 a7 Understand how decisions affect self and others

competency 8 level 1 explore and improve decision making21
Competency 8Level 1: Explore and improve decision-making

Stage a: ACQUISITION (8.1 a1-a7)

Stage b: APPLICATION

8.1 b1 Assess what might interfere with attaining one’s goals

8.1 b2 Apply problem-solving strategies

8.1 b3 Make decisions and take responsibility for them

competency 8 level 1 explore and improve decision making22
Competency 8Level 1: Explore and improve decision-making

Stage a: ACQUISITION (8.1 a1-a7)

Stage b: APPLICATION (8.1 b1-b3)

Stage c: PERSONALIZATION

8.1 c1 Examine one’s problem-solving strategies and evaluate their impact on the attainment of one’s goals

8.1 c2 Evaluate the impact of personal decisions on self and on others

competency 8 level 1 explore and improve decision making23
Competency 8Level 1: Explore and improve decision-making

Stage a: ACQUISITION (8.1 a1-a7)

Stage b: APPLICATION (8.1 b1-b3)

Stage c: PERSONALIZATION (8.1 c1-c2)

Stage d: ACTUALIZATION

8.1 d1 Engage in a responsible decision-making process

slide24

Measurable Standards

Competency 8, Level Three:

8.3 Engage in life/work decision making

8.3 a8 Explore how being positive about the future and its uncertainties may lead to creative and interesting possibilities.

A possible standard for grade ten students:

  • Students will be able to explain HB Gelatt’s 4 “rules of the road never taken” and describe a personal metaphor for their own life/work journey (river, sea, roller coaster, dice, etc.)
slide25

Guidelines Planning Process

Step 1

Assessing Students’, Clients’ or Employees’ Needs

Floating Step II

Strategizing

Marketing and Obtaining Support

Floating Step I

Assuring Organizational Readiness

Step 4

Strategizing Programs and Services Improvements

Step 2

Revisiting One’s Mandate

Step 3

Assessing Programs and Services

slide28

Career Management Skills

Curricula

Grade 9/10

Grade 3/4

Grade 11/12

Grade 5/6

www.realgame.com

Adults

Grade 7/8

slide29

COMPETENCIES

US Guidelines – Canadian Blueprint

  • COMPETENCIES - Four LEVELS
    • Level 1: Primary School
    • Level 2: Middle School
    • Level 3: High School
    • Level 4: Adults
  • INDICATORS - Four LEARNING STAGES
    • Stage 1: Acquisition
    • Stage 2: Application
    • Stage 3: Personalization
    • Stage 4: Actualization
slide31

STATUS IN CANADA

SPRING 2003

TOTAL: 18,000 SCHOOLS

18 %

2005 GOAL: 80 %

36 %

76 %

46 %

16 %

slide32

Serious life and career building programs

… disguised as games

www.realgame.com

1 888 533-5683

slide33

More Information:

Rich Froeshle, Director

Texas Career Resources Network

Career Development Resources (CDR)

(512) 491-4941

rich@cdr.state.tx.us

www.realgame.com

1-888-700-8940